Vogelein, Volume 1: Clockwork Faerie

Overview

When Jakob, Vogelein's Guardian of fifty years, dies quietly in his sleep one night, her life is thrown into utter turmoil. Left without someone to wind her, the tiny clockwork faerie has less than five hours to live - unless she can find someone to trust. Unable to reach the keyhole in her back, she continues to wind down until she stops - and then her memories of the past three hundred years will quickly slip away, leaving her a simple automaton unable to speak or move on her own. In her search for a new ...

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Overview

When Jakob, Vogelein's Guardian of fifty years, dies quietly in his sleep one night, her life is thrown into utter turmoil. Left without someone to wind her, the tiny clockwork faerie has less than five hours to live - unless she can find someone to trust. Unable to reach the keyhole in her back, she continues to wind down until she stops - and then her memories of the past three hundred years will quickly slip away, leaving her a simple automaton unable to speak or move on her own. In her search for a new Guardian, Vogelein must grapple with her own past, her current daily survival and a true Faerie who has taken an instant disliking to her, all so that she will not lose her memories - and her self.

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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
Gr. 5-up. Clockwork Faerie collects the first five issues of Vogelein into a wonderfully creative graphic novel about Vogelein, a beautiful mechanical fairy created in the seventeenth century. Although she is immortal, she must be wound every 36 hours. After her old friend and caretaker dies, she must find someone new to take care of her. Her search introduces her to a sheltered college student, a wise street cleaner, and the bitter fairy Midhir, who has been transformed by the industrial world of Man. Through these relationships and her cherished memories, Vogelein discovers her own humanity in a modern world that often ignores the possibility of magic. This modern fable is a rare treasure that weaves fanciful imagination into themes of individuality, diversity, and independence. The art is beautifully shaded black and white, and it carries the narrative impeccably, bringing across both the emotions of the characters and the depth of their world. Great for middle readers who like graphic novels or for younger children to share with an adult.
Tina Coleman, Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
Library Journal
Vogelein is a mechanical fairy doll made in 17th-century Germany who took on a life of her own. Since her creator's death, she has passed from one caretaker to another, each of whom is sure to wind her once a day with her key; if she goes 36 hours without winding, she will lose her memories and, eventually, her life. Now she is forced to make her own way in a modern city when her latest guardian dies. Various encounters-with a man who betrays her, a bitter and twisted genuine faerie, and an outcast who knows about the faerie world-allow her to learn about her own nature and to gain, perhaps for the first time in her life, not a guardian but a friend. This is a touching story, somber and reflective, and Irwin's exquisite, realistic black-and-white paintings fit the book's air of memory and strangeness very well. Recommended for teen and adult fans of prose fantasies in modern settings at all libraries. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780974311005
  • Publisher: Fiery Studios
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Pages: 168
  • Sales rank: 1,355,549
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2006

    Vogelein: Clockwork Faerie

    Vogelein Clockwork Faerie begins with the introduction of Voglin and Jakob, her last guardian. Jakob dies soon after the book begins and Vogelein was left alone for the first time in her life. In desperate need of winding, ran into the destructive faerie who challengeed Vogelein and demands that she name herself as a faerie or a machine. Vogelein has run-ins with the evil faerie throughout the book. Throughout the book, Vogelein has flashbacks of her first love and creator. Vogelein finally meets someone willing to help and Vogelein works to find her new guardian. The book is illustrated and written in shades of black and white. The authors Jane Irwin and Jeff Berndt, leave quit a few frames void of text, which forces the reader to really take in the detail and meaning of each picture. The absences of text in some places also leaves room for the reader to question what is happening in the story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2006

    Vogelein: Clockwork Faerie

    Vogelein Clockwork Faerie begins with the introduction of Voglin and Jakob, her last guardian. Jakob dies soon after the book begins and Vogelein is left alone for the first time in her life. Because she is not human, Vogelein must find someone to wined her so that she can stay conscious. She runs into the destructive faerie who challenges Vogelein and demands that she name herself as a faerie or a machine. Vogelein has run-ins with the evil faerie throughout the book. Vogelein finally meets someone willing to help. The man befriends Vogelein and the book ends with the two working together to find Vogelein a kind and caring guardian. The book is illustrated and written in shades of black and white. The authors Jane Irwin and Jeff Berndt, leave quit a few frames void of text, which forces the reader to really take in the detail and meaning of each picture. The absences of text in some places also leaves room for the reader to question what is happening in the story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2011

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