A Voice from South Carolina

A Voice from South Carolina

by John A. Leland
     
 

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The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select…  See more details below

Overview

The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Publisher: Charleston, S.C., Walker, Evans

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940023989426
Publisher:
Walker, Evans & Cogswell
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
338 KB

Read an Excerpt


1874. CHAPTER THIRD. RECONSTRUCTION. The first ray of hope that dawned on the dark picture given in the last chapter, was the announcement of President Johnson's " Policy " of restoring the Confederate States to the Union, on their complying with certain conditions precedent. In pursuance of this policy, the Hon. B. F. Perry, a thorough Union man, all before and through the war, but highly respected, and honored by his fellow-citizens, for his high character, unswerving integrity, and his honesty of purpose, was appointed " Provisional Governor " by the President. And now, in 1865, for the first time, the forms of Government were, once more, assumed. 'A convention of the people was called to alter and amend the constitution. Just then began that system , of "dirt eating," whereby her own citizens have been made to bring degradation on the State. In complying with the "conditions" emanating from Washington, many of the old land-marks of the past, hallowed by the most sacred associations, were removed by our own people. Those who have felt the power of W. II. Seward, still Secretary of State, at Washington, could easily discern " the hand of Joab" in these requirements, though they came ostensiblyfrom the President. At last, the State, in this fundamental law, was made to abolish slavery or, rather, to recognize abolition, and to declare that the institution should never again exist within her borders. Under this constitution, the courts were re-opened, a Legislature elected, as also members of Congress and U. S. Senators. All the conditions were fully complied with, and the State fully equipped for a new departure. Her citizens once more began to breathe freely, and hopes for thefuture began, at last, to loom up before them. Unfortunately, all this was soon clou...

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