Voice Of Anna Julia Cooper / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $4.53
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 84%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $4.53   
  • New (8) from $14.15   
  • Used (10) from $4.53   

Overview

This collection is a major contribution to the reconstruction of gender balance in African-American history —Manning Marable, Columbia University

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The Journal Of Southern History
Historians, literary critics, and general readers alike will appreciate having access to Cooper's viewpoints.
— Kathryn L. Seidel
Washington History
Charles Lemert and Esme Bhan's collection serves a timely purpose. A number of Cooper's less familiar writtings, many previously unpublished or virtually inaccesssible, are also included in this compilation and demonstrate the range of her interests, from race politics to the role of humor in teaching. Lemert and Bhan's introduction provides a comprehensive overview of Cooper's life and interactions with other black intellectuals, including W.E.B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells, Charlotte Grimke, and Mary Church Terrell. The editors have chosen wisely from a lifetime of work.
Waterwheel
The writings of this influential African American activist make for powerful reading.
Journal Of Southern History
Historians, literary critics, and general readers alike will appreciate having access to Cooper's viewpoints.
— Kathryn L. Seidel, University of Central Florida
History Of Education Quarterly
The Voice of Anna Julia Cooper is, quite simply, a fine collection. Carefully edited, it contributes greatly to the study of the history of this country.
— Cally L. Waite, Teachers College, Columbia University
National Women's Studies Association Journal
This is an impressive, meticulously researched, and wonderfully written study. It does much to further our understanding of southern women—black and white, conservative and progressive—and their efforts to expand the public role of women in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.
— Christina Greene, University of South Florida
CHOICE
This is a good selection of 29 of [Cooper's] writings on varied subjects ranging from her A Voice from the South (1892) to her "Hitler and the Negro" (1942). . . . Theoretical scholars debate how to characterize her; the gracefully written introductions in this valuable volume deftly put the debates in perspective. . . . Highly recommended.
— J. H. Smith, Wake Forest University
Harvard Educational Review
The Voice of Anna Julia Cooper will surely be an instructive and engaging read for those interested in African American educational history or feminist philosophy, as well as for those who enjoy reading astute observations on race, gender, and class in society.
The Journal of Southern History
Historians, literary critics, and general readers alike will appreciate having access to Cooper's viewpoints.
— Kathryn L. Seidel, University of Central Florida
Choice
This is a good selection of 29 of [Cooper's] writings on varied subjects ranging from her A Voice from the South (1892) to her "Hitler and the Negro" (1942). . . . Theoretical scholars debate how to characterize her; the gracefully written introductions in this valuable volume deftly put the debates in perspective. . . . Highly recommended.
— J. H. Smith, Wake Forest University
David Levering Lewis
Thanks to this much-awaited edition with its excellent introduction, Anna Julia Cooper will no longer be merely a citation in the indices of works on women and people of color. As their title aptly announces, Esme Bhan and Charles Lemert have retrieved for us The Voice of Anna Julia Cooper.
Paula Giddings
A much-needed addition to the dearth of primary sources which will illuminate one of history's most important feminist figures.
Manning Marable
Cooper may be the founding figure in contemporary writings bringing together race, class, and gender—the foremother of today's influential black feminist writers. This collection is a major contribution to the reconstruction of gender balance in African American history.
Carla L. Peterson
Writing over a fifty-year period, Cooper not only participated in the ongoing dialogue over race relations and racial uplift in the United States, but also turned a scholarly lens on the history of the slave trade and the development of the Black Atlantic. She belongs in the company of W.E.B. Du Bois.
The Journal of Southern History - Kathryn L. Seidel
Historians, literary critics, and general readers alike will appreciate having access to Cooper's viewpoints.
History of Education Quarterly - Cally L. Waite
The Voice of Anna Julia Cooper is, quite simply, a fine collection. Carefully edited, it contributes greatly to the study of the history of this country.
National Women's Studies Association Journal - Christina Greene
This is an impressive, meticulously researched, and wonderfully written study. It does much to further our understanding of southern women—black and white, conservative and progressive—and their efforts to expand the public role of women in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.
CHOICE - J. H. Smith
This is a good selection of 29 of [Cooper's] writings on varied subjects ranging from her A Voice from the South (1892) to her "Hitler and the Negro" (1942). . . . Theoretical scholars debate how to characterize her; the gracefully written introductions in this valuable volume deftly put the debates in perspective. . . . Highly recommended.
Library Journal
Lemert and Bhan bring to life the remarkable Anna Julia Cooper (1858-1964), teacher, scholar, social activist, college president, writer, and emblem of black women of America. Although there are two important biographical studies of Cooper, by Louise Daniel Hutchinson (1981) and Leona C. Gabel (1982), this is the first collection of her writings. It includes her most famous published work, A Voice from the South, by a Black Woman of the South (1892), and an array of essays, speeches, and letters previously accessible only through archival collections, primarily Howard University's Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. The "voice" of Cooper clearly indicates an individual who knows who she is, what she believes, and what she wants and is forthright in presenting her views and convictions on race politics, feminism, social services, education, race and culture, and slavery. It is a "voice" well worth reading for the ideas and convictions expressed but also as a reflection of the progress and lack of progress in American culture. Editors Lemert (sociology, Wesleyan Univ.) and Bhan, former principal curator at the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center and former director of the African American indexing project at the Smithsonian Institution, have created a book that belongs in all academic libraries.Jeris Cassel, Rutgers Univ. Libs., New Brunswick, NJ
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780847684083
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 1/25/1998
  • Series: Legacies of Social Thought Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 370
  • Sales rank: 1,370,689
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Anna Julia Cooper: The Colored Woman's Office Part 2 I. The Colored Woman’s Office: A Voice from the South Chapter 3 Our Raison d'Etre (1892) Chapter 4 Womanhood: A Vital Element in the Regeneration and Progress of a Race (1886) Chapter 5 The Higher Education of Women (1890-1891) Chapter 6 "Woman versus the Indian" (1891-1892) Chapter 7 The Status of Woman in America (1892) Part 8 II. Race and Culture: A Voice from the South Chapter 9 Has America a Race Problem? If So, How Can It Best Be Solved? (1892) Chapter 10 The Negro As Presented in American Literature (1892) Chapter 11 What Are We Worth? (1892) Chapter 12 The Gain from a Belief (1892) Part 13 III. The Range of Cooper’s Voice: Feminism, Social Service, Education, and Race Politics Chapter 14 The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women in the United States since the Emancipation Proclamation: A Response to Fannie Barrier Williams (1893) Chapter 15 The Ethics of the Negro Question (1902) Chapter 16 The Social Settlement: What It Is, and What It Does (1913) Chapter 17 Sketches from a Teacher's Notebook: Loss of Speech through Isolation (1923?) Chapter 18 Foreword to Le Pelerinage de Charlemagne (1925) Chapter 19 The Humor of Teaching (1930) Chapter 20 My Racial Philosophy (1930) Chapter 21 The Negro's Dialect (1930s?) Chapter 22 On Education (1930s?) Angry Saxons and Negro Education (1938) Chapter 23 Hitler and the Negro (1942?) Part 24 IV. World Politics, Race, and Slavery: The Historical Studies Chapter 25 The Social Conditions of the French-American Colonies: The Class Structure (1925) Chapter 26 Black Slavery and the French Nation (1925) Chapter 27 Equality of Races and the Democratic Movement (1925) Chapter 28 Legislative Measures Concerning Slavery in the United States: 1787-1850 (1925) Part 29 V. Reflections on Her Life: Memoirs, Occasional Writings, Letters: 1925-1958 Chapter 30 The Early Years in Washington: Reminiscences of Life with the Grimkes (1951) Chapter 31 The Third Step: Cooper's Memoir of the Sorbonne Doctorate (1945-1950?) Chapter 32 Selected Letters and Other Writings (1925-1958) Chapter 33 The Life of Anna Julia Cooper: A Chronology Chapter 34 Index
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)