Voice of Deliverance

Voice of Deliverance

by Keith D. Miller
     
 
What made the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.s so inspiring to all people and enabled blacks and whites to move in harmony to action and commitment? Keith Miller shows how the skillful borrowing and blending of both black and white written traditions was the key to King's effectiveness.

Overview

What made the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.s so inspiring to all people and enabled blacks and whites to move in harmony to action and commitment? Keith Miller shows how the skillful borrowing and blending of both black and white written traditions was the key to King's effectiveness.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
Miller (English, Arizona State) has written a complex, convincing analysis of the sources of King's major sermons and public works. In brief, Miller argues that King borrowed ideas, patterns, words, even whole paragraphs from two main sources: white Protestant ministers' radio sermons and the traditions of the African American folk pulpit. King melded these ``borrowings'' into consistently powerful sermons for social change. To Miller, this was not plagiarism, but perfectly consistent with the American homiletic tradition. King's ability to reshape old works was his greatest rhetorical strength. Miller's study provides a fascinating counterpoint to recent attacks on King's originality. It is highly recommended for all major libraries.-- A.O. Edmonds, Ball State Univ., Muncie, Ind.
Booknews
Reprint of the 1992 edition with a new (10p.) afterword by Miller. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780029215210
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
11/28/1991
Pages:
286

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