Voices of The Alamo

Voices of The Alamo

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by Sherry Garland, Ronald Himler

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Through poetry and art, this picture book captures the many voices--Spanish, Tejano, Texan, Mexican, and American--of the people who lived on the land that is now Texas.  See more details below


Through poetry and art, this picture book captures the many voices--Spanish, Tejano, Texan, Mexican, and American--of the people who lived on the land that is now Texas.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Individual voices from past to present speak to us of the events that mark the history of the place that has become a national symbol. Before the famous 1836 battle, Native Americans, Spanish explorers, Franciscan missionaries, Mexicans and Americans came there. Years later, the building was rescued from destruction and preserved. Each of Garland's actors speaks simply, directly, and compellingly to tell a part of what has become more legend than history. And each is depicted in a double-page scene, a dramatic staging designed to evoke appropriate emotions--the gentle quiet of the mission period; the colorful market in front of the decaying mission; the deep blues and eerie white building just before the Mexican attack. Himler's realistic paintings include the costumes and artifacts of each time as well as a sensitive portrayal of landscape. History is given a properly reverent setting in both words and images. A lengthy, detailed history is appended. 2000, Scholastic Press, Ages 7 to 10, $16.95. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-A fresh approach to the topic in a picture-book format. Garland speaks in the voices of 16 characters whose lives lead up to the present day. She begins with an Indian woman of 1500 gathering nuts beside a river (presumably the San Antonio). The author then gives voice to anonymous armored Spaniards and cowled priests, Tejanos and Texans, and finally to individuals such as General Santa Anna and David Crockett. Within this device, she retells the story of the fall of the Alamo, General Sam Houston's victory at San Jacinto, and Clara Driscoll's rescue of the Alamo from demolition in 1904. Garland's point of view is traditionally partisan. The villain, Santa Anna, is shown as having coerced his own soldiers, as well as having trampled on the rights of honest colonists. Himler's outstanding double-page watercolors depict characters, sweeping landscapes, battle scenes, and the Alamo throughout its history and fill the pages with bright colors. The book includes a lengthy historical note that provides background information and a glossary of Spanish words and phrases. The book, which will supplement traditional nonfiction accounts of the events, ends with an appeal to readers to "remember."-Ruth Semrau, Upshur County Public Library, Gilmer, TX Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

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Product Details

Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
Voices of History
Sales rank:
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 9.42(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
8 Years

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Voices of The Alamo 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We visited San Antonio, TX on spring break this year and picked up this book to donate to our son's school library. Once we read through it a few times we decided to order a copy for ourselves as well since it was so fascinating. I love that it is told from a first person point of view. Each page shows a slice of history from a particular individual's perspective. It begins with a Payaya Indian Maiden collecting pecans by the river banks around 1500 then travels through history with passages of a Spanish Conquistador, a humble padre, a Spanish soldier, a Tejano Rancher, a Texian Farmer, David Crockett, Sam Houston, and others along the way. The final perspective is told by a young child of modern times who visited the Alamo. Wonderfully, written and very appropriate for grade school children. There is mention of war, death and violence but in a gentle way. (This was not exactly a fairy tale setting in history as we all know). I would definately suggest this book for any classroom or personal reading library. My son is in Kindergarten and really loves this book but I do believe older children would enjoy it as well. This is positively a 5-star book about the Lone Star State.