Vol. II

Vol. II

5.0 3
by Hurt
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Picking up precisely where Hurt's debut left off, Vol. II is the companion piece and culmination of all the group began on Vol. I. In fact, early on, the band originally envisioned this musical corpus if not as a double set, at least as a pair of bookends to be released together. It wasn't to be, and so the two were recorded

Overview

Picking up precisely where Hurt's debut left off, Vol. II is the companion piece and culmination of all the group began on Vol. I. In fact, early on, the band originally envisioned this musical corpus if not as a double set, at least as a pair of bookends to be released together. It wasn't to be, and so the two were recorded separately, with time for growth in between. And grow they have, with Vol. II exhibiting a greater maturity, a more coherent sound, and a more self-confident band. Even so, the two sets are closely intertwined, with themes, both lyrical and musical, from the first disc referenced in the second. On "Better," addiction masquerades as love, on "Abuse of Sid," love masks self-loathing, but with "Assurance," love means never having to say good-bye for good. Cross out "woman" and substitute drugs or alcohol on the latter number, and you've circled right back 'round to addiction. Most chilling, though, is "Talking to God," where there's no love at all, except for a misplaced love of the Lord. The closing triplet "On the Radio," "Et Al," and "Thank You for Listening" struggles with the artist's relationship to his audiences, sometimes symbiotic, other times parasitic. These shifting sands evoke love and hate, frustration and fear, pain and joy, a never-ending waltz between reality and reflection, but which is the mirror and which the solid object, the fans or the band? The music is as varied and complex as the themes, with the epic opener "Summers Lost" one of the set's high points. The radio-friendly "Ten Ton Brick" was the obvious pick for first single, its counterpoint, "Aftermath," not so much so, but a wonderfully moody, introspective number regardless. "Abuse of Sid" is a heady brew of classic and modern rock elements, "Better" a splendid alt-rocker with dramatic shifts in tempo and mood, "God" is graced with dramatic strings, "Assurance" with jazzy piano and a glowing prog rock atmosphere, and "Alone with the Sea" sports a melancholy banjo. An adventurous and powerful set musically and emotionally, rounding off the phenomenal journey the band began on Vol. I.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/25/2007
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0094639465620
catalogNumber:
94656
Rank:
93527

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Hurt   Primary Artist
Valerie Carter   Vocals
Lenny Castro   Percussion
Elaine Caswell   Vocals
Lynn Fiddmont   Vocals
Evan Johns & His H-Bombs   Drums
Paul Spatola   Dobro,Guitar,Piano
Eyvonne Williams Hines   Vocals

Technical Credits

Ted Taylor   Art Direction
Larry Tuttle   String Arrangements
Novi Novog   String Arrangements
Eric Greedy   Producer,Engineer
Dave Watts   Drum Technician
Tom Lewis   Engineer,Management
Dave Klotz   Programming,String Arrangements
Brian Winshell   Programming
Tom Gloady   Engineer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Vol. II 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hurt's distinctive sound is like Tool filtered through Alice In Chains with Pearl Jam colliding with Godsmack. Still, they have a sound all their own, made all the more distinct by J. Loren’s beautiful, gritty vocals. Loren’s talents as a lyricist really shine here. The stories are told in ways that people can truly relate to. They tell of struggles with addiction (“Loded,” “Better”), painful relationships (“On The Radio,” “Abuse of SID”), and disillusion with religion (“Talking To God”). Despite the openness of the lyrics, they never sound clichéd, or voyeuristic. He wants to leave a lasting impression on the listener, and that’s exactly what Vol. II does. “Summers Lost” kicks off with a quiet acoustic guitar riff that develops into a crescendo with great loud-soft dynamics. Following this is “Ten Ton Brick,” which is Hurt at their hardest. Even when they’re chugging away with heavy basslines, the band never ceases to be melodic. Songs like “Assurance” and “Alone With The Sea” round out the setlist with beautiful, mellow passages and amazing vocal harmonies. The music is also more diverse, covering more ground as the band transitions seamlessly between melodic metal (“Ten Ton Brick,” “Loded”), acoustic riffs (“Summers Lost, “Assurance”), and beautiful harmonizing vocals (“Alone With The Sea"). Hurt’s debut album was fantastically diverse, but Vol. II takes this to new heights. Vol. I introduced Hurt and showcased their flawless songwriting and terrific musicianship. Everything that made Hurt special from Vol. I has been magnified tenfold here. It pushes Hurt’s musicianship to new heights and gives us a few surprises, but doesn’t stray too far from Hurt’s refreshingly distinct sound.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was in a fit of spontinaity that I bought Hurt's first CD. I thought they were alright from what songs I've heard on the radio, but it was the nonradio-friendly songs that blew me away. Hoping that Hurt was able to resist the allure of making radio-friendly music I went out and bought Vol. II, and as you'd have it I lucked out. This Cd has become one of my all-time favorites. The literature in which J. Loren uses in his songs helps to satiate my need to feel smarter than everyone else, though it can be presumptuous who cares so am I. It's just incredible how many new and different approaches the band make toward these songs where the experiementation actually pays off. It'd take some open-mindedness from Tool fans to take on this band, but I recommend them for their similar musical composition where the hook isn't thrown in after two phrases. Theres actual points to the songs being arranged the way they are. Give this CD a try and you'll find at least one moment where Hurt's music will open your ear and climb into your head with an accessibility to the rest of their set. Ever since this CD I check every week to see news of any new CD coming out from this band. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago