Volcano

Volcano

by Edie Brickell
     
 

For the better part of a decade, this once ubiquitous singer-songwriter has eschewed the spotlight, concentrating on family matters while hubby Paul Simon held court in the music room. With Volcano, Brickell stages a comeback, marked by the same quiet, quirky charm that attracted her cadre of fans in the first place. The disc's first…  See more details below

Overview

For the better part of a decade, this once ubiquitous singer-songwriter has eschewed the spotlight, concentrating on family matters while hubby Paul Simon held court in the music room. With Volcano, Brickell stages a comeback, marked by the same quiet, quirky charm that attracted her cadre of fans in the first place. The disc's first single, "Rush Around," carries the same straightforward appeal of songs like "What I Am," but these days, Brickell is a little less frantic, more prone to stop and smell the roses -- a mood that's mirrored in the tune's catchy waltz-time chorus. "Oo La La" revisits the bohemian (no pun intended) vibe of her pre-hiatus career, with gentle breathy vocals hovering over a lattice of piano, acoustic guitar, and lightly brushed percussion. "I'll Be Surprised," on the other hand, finds Brickell venturing into torch-song territory to stake out a piece of sonic ground not all that far from the one Norah Jones claimed with "Don't Know Why." Edie can still trip herself up by getting too wordy from time to time (as on the beatnik-ish "The Messenger"); but by and large, Volcano is a collection of simple treasures, curios that the craftswoman knows not to over-polish, lest they lose their innate allure.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
Ever since Edie Brickell got up on-stage one night with a Texas band called New Bohemians in the mid-'80s, her musical career has been a series of happy accidents. So, it should be no surprise that her solo work has been only occasional. Her split from New Bohemians after 1990's Ghost of a Dog was followed by her 1992 marriage to Paul Simon, with whom she started a family. She returned in 1994 with her solo debut, Picture Perfect Morning, and 2002's Ultimate Collection compilation included many unreleased tracks, indicating that there had been some abortive attempts to make music since. Volcano, however, is her first full-length effort in nine years, and with an output like that, she must be considered only a part-time recording artist. But her work has been quite consistent all along. It is both charming and elusive, engaging and yet weightless. Here, using a basic band usually consisting of producer Charlie Sexton on guitar and other instruments, Carter Albrecht on keyboards, Pino Palladino on bass, and Steve Gadd on drums, she creates lilting folk-rock tracks, over which she sings in her breathy voice fragmentary lyrics touching on love and memory. Romantic devotion mixes with images of a rural past in a good-natured tone, but as the pronouns mix "I," "you," "he," and "she," the meanings rarely come clear to the listener. There are exceptions: "Take a Walk" finds the singer encouraging someone to relax; "What Would You Do," the concluding track, is a story-song about a runaway with a beginning, middle, and end. But most often, Brickell hangs her songs on repeated phrases, relying on her appealing voice and the sprung rhythms set up by the acoustic instruments to carry her through. This is not music made by a musician bent on being understood by a mass of listeners, but rather one setting her internal musings to music and getting a major label hoping for commercial lightning to strike again to put it out. Her patient fan base will be pleased, but others probably won't even know she has returned.

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Product Details

Release Date:
10/14/2003
Label:
Umvd Labels
UPC:
0602498606209
catalogNumber:
000096302

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Edie Brickell   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Background Vocals
Charlie Sexton   Acoustic Guitar,Percussion,Violin,Cello,Electric Guitar,Keyboards,Viola,Background Vocals,Mellotron,Gut String Guitar,Lap Steel Guitar
Andy Fairweather Low   Electric Guitar,Hi String Guitar (Acoustic)
Steve Gadd   Percussion,Drums
Tony Garnier   Bass,Upright Bass
Pino Palladino   Bass
George Recile   Drums
Carter Albrecht   Clarinet,Piano,Keyboards,Vibes

Technical Credits

Charlie Sexton   Producer
Edie Brickell   Composer
Andy Smith   Engineer
Scott Hull   Mastering
Sandy Brummels   Art Direction
Big Stuff   Drawing
Claudius Mittendorfer   Engineer
Yuek Wong   Guitar Techician
Chris Testa   Drum Technician
Lulu McGillicutty   Drawing

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