The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook

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Overview

"Voodoo Hoodoo" is the unique variety of Creole Voodoo found in New Orleans. The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is a rich compendium of more than 300 authentic Voodoo and Hoodoo recipes, rituals, and spells for love, justice, gambling luck, prosperity, health, and success.

Cultural psychologist and root worker Denise Alvarado, who grew up in New Orleans, draws from a lifetime of recipes and spells learned from family, friends, and local practitioners. She traces the history of the ...

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Overview

"Voodoo Hoodoo" is the unique variety of Creole Voodoo found in New Orleans. The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is a rich compendium of more than 300 authentic Voodoo and Hoodoo recipes, rituals, and spells for love, justice, gambling luck, prosperity, health, and success.

Cultural psychologist and root worker Denise Alvarado, who grew up in New Orleans, draws from a lifetime of recipes and spells learned from family, friends, and local practitioners. She traces the history of the African-based folk magic brought by slaves to New Orleans, and shows how it evolved over time to include influences from Native American spirituality, Catholicism, and Pentecostalism. She shares her research into folklore collections and 19th- and 20th- century formularies along with her own magical arts.

The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook includes more than 100 spells for Banishing, Binding, Fertility, Luck, Protection, Money, and more. Alvarado introduces readers to the Pantheon of Voodoo Spirits, the Seven African Powers, and other important Loas, Prayers, Novenas, and Psalms, and much, much more, including:
* Oils and Potions: Attraction Love Oil, Dream Potion, Gambler's Luck Oil, Blessing Oil
* Hoodoo Powders and Gris Gris: Algier's Fast Luck Powder, Controlling Powder, Money Drawing Powder
* Talismans and Candle Magic
* Curses and Hexes

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A triumph of painstaking and meticulous research. Esteemed author Denise Alvarado, herself raised in New Orleans, has studied mysticism and practiced Voodoo Hoodoo and indigenous healing traditions for over three decades. She is an academic anthropologist, cultural psychologist, writer, artist, spiritual adviser, and consultant. The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is the culmination of the author's decades of practical experience in authentic Voodoo rituals. Wonderfully readable, The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook will prove a necessary companion to both beginner and experienced practitioner alike. A brilliant and all-encompassing work and an invaluable source of recorded oral tradition." -Dr. Ann Nyland, author/translator of Complete Books of Enoch

"Presented in a down-to-earth, easy to understand style--and jam-packed with a wealth of practical information--The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is, without a doubt, a practitioner's fondest dream come true. No magical workspace is complete without it!" -Dorothy Morrison, author of Utterly Wicked and Everyday Magic

"Hoodoo and the conjure arts are at the center of a growing spiritual movement, as Western seekers redefine their relationship to religion and the occult. The self-help phase of the occult revival--epitomized by the New Age and Neopaganism for the last half-century--is quickly giving way to nuts-and-bolts, hands-on practical magick that gets things done. You could not ask for a better introduction to Voodoo, hoodoo, gris gris or conjure than Denise Alvarado's The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook. The author grew up in New Orleans and Mississippi, and learned the art directly from the source. She is also an anthropologist with a firm grasp on the African Diaspora and its relationship to her home town. This book contains everything from history to folklore, Loas to Orishas, saints and psalms, oils, powders, inks, washes, gris gris, talismans, candles, and conjure spells for every imaginable need. Whether your interest in Voodoo and hoodoo are academic or you want to learn to lay a few tricks, The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is the best place to start." -Aaron Leitch, author of Secrets of the Magickal Grimoire

"Denise Alvarado's The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is a work of considerable value to anyone interested in the workings of magic as performed in the New Orleans area of Louisiana. It is not a tourist-tempting hodgepodge of phony recipes but a serious compilation of authentic rituals, spells, and instructions gathered by a 'root worker' who grew up in the area. As background to the meat of this work, Ms. Alvarado includes a history of this particular folk magic and of its practitioners. Whatever the spell or charm you need, you are certain to find it here...and it will be effective! Along with her words, enjoy Denise's beautiful artwork." -Raymond Buckland, Buckland's Book of Gypsy Magic

"New Orleans Voodoo and Hoodoo have a uniquely sumptuous flavor all their own. Denise Alvarado captures that flavor perfectly in The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook because she has long been immersed in its magic and culture. The spells she presents are steeped in the wisdom of the river, the bayous, and the roots and plants that folk practitioners have used for centuries. As the famed New Orleans Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau did before her, Denise creates a path to these traditions for all who seek to discover them. Explore everything from the pantheons of Voodoo to their corresponding saints and the prayers to call them; learn about the roots, herbs, oils, and other ingredients that practitioners use; and employ voodoo dolls, gris gris, and other powerful spirit tools that can help you work the magic!" --Christian Day, author of The Witches' Book of the Dead

"Born and raised in New Orleans, Denise Alvarado learned her craft at a very early age from members of her family, and later from various teachers and mentors. Over the past several decades she has not only made a scholarly study of various forms of magick and healing, as an anthropologist and psychologist, but she has also practiced these traditions at length, becoming a respected spiritual-worker, consultant, and writer in her own right. Written in a simple, easy-to-understand style, The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook is overflowing with valuable information pertaining to the theory and practice of authentic Voodoo hoodoo. In addition to a brief historical overview of these practices in New Orleans, here you will find spells, rituals, formulas, and prayers for virtually any conceivable purpose along with correspondence charts arranged by use or purpose for easy reference that will assist you in crafting your own spells and formulas. In short, this book contains everything you need to know in order to practice successful magick in the Voodoo Hoodoo tradition. This is a book that you will return to again and again." -Carolina Dean, author, associate editor and contributor to Hoodoo and Conjure Quarterly

Library Journal
A formally trained anthropologist and practicing clinical psychologist, Alvarado (Exu, Divine Trickster and Master Magician) shares her lifelong experience as a student and practitioner of New Orleans-style voodoo in this sweeping book as she seeks to provide a clearheaded look into one of America's most misunderstood magical traditions. The first few chapters describe how the historical intermingling of French culture with the cultures of African slaves and Native American tribes, plus a healthy dose of enforced Catholicism, created the cultural soup in New Orleans that culminated in what Alvarado calls "voodoo hoodoo." Further chapters illuminate the beliefs and practices surrounding the complex cosmology of gods, saints, and spirit forces; coherently outline the difference between the religion of voodoo and the magical practices of hoodoo; and explain the use of gris-gris, spells, charms, and totems. The remaining chapters are an extensive compilation of spells, workings, and rituals. VERDICT Occultists will delight in the extremely generous and thorough hoodoo grimoire, materia medica, correspondence charts, and gris-gris formulary. Students of African American history and culture, Southern history buffs, and cultural anthropologists will also find this a fascinating and well-documented read.—Janet Tapper, Univ. of Western States Lib., Portland, OR
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781578635139
  • Publisher: Red Wheel/Weiser
  • Publication date: 11/1/2011
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 130,189
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Denise Alvarado is a native Creole raised in the Voodoo and Hoodoo rich culture of New Orleans. She is a root worker in the New Orleans Voodoo hoodoo tradition, a medicine woman in the Native American tradition, an independent researcher, ritual artist, spiritual adviser, and seminar leader. Her provocative artwork has been featured on National Geographic's Taboo. Visit her at: www.planetvoodoo.com

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Read an Excerpt

THE VOODOO HOODOO SPELLBOOK


By DENISE ALVARADO

Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC

Copyright © 2011 Denise Alvarado
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-60925-615-9



CHAPTER 1

The Basics


In New Orleans, anyone can practice Voodoo. There is no formal religious initiation rite, no rigid orthodoxy, and there are no standard ways to worship—though there are guidelines. Voodoo is a fluid, adaptable, syncretic, and inclusive spiritual and religious practice that embraces the hearts of all people, no matter their race, creed, or origin. The loas, spirits, orishas, and mysteries—all terms used to describe the divine archetypal forces of Voodoo—are ever-changing, manifesting in infinite ways according to the filter of a given culture and geographic location.

The word Voodoo means "spirit of God." Contrary to popular belief, Voodoo is first and foremost about healing. It is a religious system based on three levels of spirit: God, the loa, and ancestors. Voodoo believers accept the existence of one ultimate god referred to as Bon Dieu (Good God), below which are the powerful spirits often referred to as loas. These powerful spirits act as intermediaries between Bon Dieu and practitioners and are responsible for the daily matters of life in the areas of family, love, money, happiness, wealth, and revenge. Finally, ancestor reverence is considered the foundation of New Orleans Voodoo. The loas and ancestors are not worshipped; rather, they are served and revered, respectively.

New Orleans was a major port where multiple cultures converged, and as a result, the influences on New Orleans Voodoo are very diverse. While New Orleans Voodoo as a unique system has no formal initiation rites, many people who practice it are, in fact, initiated into one of its closely related "sister" religions. There are also family lineages in New Orleans that pass down specific traditions that are held in confidence. These are the mambos and houngans who reside in New Orleans, more commonly referred to as priests, priestesses, or kings and queens of New Orleans Voodoo. There are Cuban-inspired Santeros, Haitian-initiated mambos and houngans, Obean rootworkers from the West Indian islands (i.e. Belize, the Bahamas, Dominican Republic), followers of the Spiritualist Churches, hoodoos and rootworkers who incorporate candle magic, spells, and the veneration of Catholic saints, and followers of the Yoruba tradition of Africa. New Orleans Voodoo is highly influenced by Native American spirituality and herbalism, as well. For example, the famous Indian War Chief Black Hawk is a Voodoo saint and is often included in the ritual work of hoodoos and Spiritualists. However, many Spiritualists who venerate Black Hawk deny engaging in hoodoo activities, despite the similarities found between traditions.

This edition of The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook provides more in-depth information about the history of New Orleans Voodoo as well as a beefed-up formulary that is based on authentic New Orleans materia medica as I have learned it. The formulas found in this book may or may not be consistent with rootworker formulas found in other areas of the South. For one thing, there are influences at play in New Orleans that are not present in other areas. For example, the inclusion of Spiritualist oils and Indian spirit products were inspired by the Spiritualist churches and exploited by the hoodoo marketeers. There is the infamous Algiers district of New Orleans where some of the most popular formulas such as Fast Luck derive. And there are the Cleo May and Dixie Love products that cater to ladies of the night and to all women desirous of their effects. Furthermore, French perfumery had a huge impact on the Creoles of high society, and some of these perfume names and ingredients made their way into the hoodoo formulary. The use of Voodoo dolls and doll babies in magick spells has become iconic of New Orleans Voodoo, although their use by genuine practitioners is much more complex than is commonly perceived by the public at large. And gris gris is a completely unique magickal system in New Orleans that involves far more than filling a red flannel mojo bag with a few symbolic items of conjure.

New Orleans Voodoo lacks the rigid orthodoxy found in Haitian Vodou. According to Louis Martiné, drummer, priest, and spiritual doctor with New Orleans Voodoo Spiritual Temple:

New Orleans Voodoo is the wild child of Voodoo's feral religions, the trick played upon the trickster. In New Orleans Voodoo, where the ultimate authority rests within the individual and his or her living relationship with the loa, there can be no orthodoxy to sit in grand judgment. If judgment were to be meted out, its throne would well bear the word "success." And who is best suited to decide what is "success" than the involved mind stream as it is now (The Individual), as it was in the past (The Ancestors), and as it will be in all of its future incarnations (The Offspring)?


Because of the proliferation of misinformation on the Internet and in many books about the beginnings of Voodoo in New Orleans and, indeed, in America, I have provided a brief contextual background of its history in the following section. Many aspects of New Orleans Voodoo and hoodoo are direct holdovers from the original African religion and are not just arbitrary additions by contemporary pagans and wiccans. Though there are those obvious recent neopagan influences, I have omitted them and focused this edition of The Voodoo Hoodoo Spellbook on the practice of Voodoo and hoodoo in Louisiana and Mississippi, with a special emphasis on New Orleans traditions.

While Voodoo in New Orleans is again becoming more communal, I am from the era of oppression and intolerance that made it necessary for practitioners to go underground and practice in secret by themselves or among their families and trusted friends. Segregation was still alive and well when I was born, and I was among the first children who were "bussed" to schools in black neighborhoods and vice versa. My "in-between" color saved me from being beaten up in school, but I will never forget what it was like to watch my best friend be taunted and beaten because she was white. When I attempted to intervene, I was told by the black kids, "You okay 'cause you brown." I share this story to illustrate the climate of New Orleans from the perspective of a Creole child who received many mixed messages from members of my family and community about my ethnic identity (only claim your French heritage if you must because of your skin color; identify your Hispanic Catholic heritage, but never your indigenous roots ... all the while holding secret séances, working with the spirits, doing candle magick, learning fortune telling, my mother braiding my hair and telling me stories about being Cherokee, and being taught how to work a Voodoo doll behind closed doors). I am one rootworker who has lived long enough to witness a social climate that, while not completely tolerant by any stretch of the imagination, is more accepting of indigenous beliefs, and contains a segment of the population that not only tolerates but embraces books about Voodoo and hoodoo. The times they are still a-changin', folks. I was born a New Orleans Creole into the Mysteries and this is what I have learned by living it and breathing it.


What Is New Orleans Voodoo Hoodoo?

New Orleans is now and has ever been the hoodoo capital of America. Great names in rites that vie with those of Hayti in deeds that keep alive the powers of Africa. Hoodoo, or Voodoo, as pronounced by the whites, is burning with flame in America, with all the intensity of a suppressed religion.

—Zora Neale-Hurston


New Orleans Voodoo originated from the ancestral religions of the African Diaspora. It is one of many incarnations of African-based religions rooted in the West African Dahomean and Central African Voodoo traditions. It became syncretized with the Catholic religion as a result of the massive forced migrations, displacements of the slave trade, and the Code Noir. Slave owners forbade the Africans from practicing Voodoo under penalty of death and, in areas controlled by Catholics, forced many of them to convert to Catholicism. The result was a creolization of the names and aspects of the Voodoo spirits to those of the Christian saints that most closely resembled their particular areas of expertise or power. Under the guise of Catholicism, the religion of Voodoo survived.

Louisiana was founded in 1682 after the King of France, King Louis XIV, embarked upon active exploration of the Mississippi River in order to enlarge his own empire and stop the progress and expansion of Britain and Spain. René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, reached the mouth of the Mississippi River and claimed possession of the river and all the land around it for France. He called the new territory "Louisiane," or "Louis' land." Louisiana's colonial period lasted from 1699, when the French established a permanent settlement in the area, to 1803, when the United States purchased it. New Orleans was designated the capital of colonial Louisiana in 1718. According to the New Orleans Voodoo Museum, New Orleans Voodoo had three distinct phases: African, Creole, and American. Upon examining the historical records, I tend to agree with this categorization. The African phase began in 1719, with the arrival of the first 450 Africans who set foot in New Orleans from the Bight of Benin. According to records of the French slave trade voyages from Africa to Louisiana during the French regime, two-thirds of the slaves brought to Louisiana were from Senegambia. In 1720, 127 more slaves arrived from Senegambia. In 1721, 196 were from Senegambia, 834 were from Bight of Benin, and 294 were from Congo/Angola. From 1723 to 1747, all of the people stolen from Africa were from Senegambia, with the exception of 464 from Bight of Benin in 1728.6 Some of the specific African cultural groups that arrived in Louisiana include the Bambara, Mandinga, Wolof, Fulbe, Nard, Mina, Fon (Dahomean), Yoruba (Nago), Chamba, Congo, Ibo, Ado, Hausa, and Sango.

Most references to the African origins of New Orleans Voodoo emphasize the Congo region; however, the historical documents reflect a significant population of people from Senegambia, including some practicing Muslims (which makes sense, given Senegambia was under the rule of the Islamic Almoravides Empire; though, many resisted the conversion to Islam and maintained their traditional African religions and beliefs). The reason that so many Sengambians were sold into slavery in Louisiana was because the slave trade was organized by the Company of the Indes, a privately owned company licensed by the King of France, who held an exclusive trade monopoly in Senegal and Louisiana during the years of the African holocaust.

From a geographic perspective, Senegambia refers to a large region between Senegal and the Gambia rivers. One might assume that since the region is so large, the culture would be heterogeneous. On the contrary, there were many commonalities among the differing cultural groups, as evidenced by the similarity of language groups. It might be likened to Scandinavian culture; while Scandinavia is comprised of three different countries (Denmark, Sweden, and Norway), they are related linguistically and culturally. If you can speak one Scandinavian language, you can typically understand (i.e. speak and read) the other two. Examination of the traditional practices of the people from the Senegambia region reveals a far greater influence on New Orleans Voodoo than has been previously recognized. For example, gris gris, a religiomagical tradition from Senegambia, is one of the hallmarks of New Orleans Voodoo.

The first slaves in Louisiana were not African, however. They were Native Americans, most of whom were warriors. Some of the Native American tribes in the area at the time were the Natchez, Choctaw, Cherokee, Tunica, Tamira, Chaouchas, Chickasaw, Illinois, Houma, Arkansas, and Miami. The indigenous peoples from various tribes were captured and sold into slavery by both the British and the French. In fact, indigenous people were bought, sold, and exported from Louisiana to the West Indies at a ratio of two Indian slaves for one African slave. Even though the export of slaves was outlawed by 1726, the slave trade continued, albeit on a smaller scale.

Enslaved Africans joined enslaved Native American Indians when they arrived in Louisiana. Many times they lived under the same masters. Like the Native American Indians, the enslaved Africans were not the passive, submissive people so often depicted in print and media. Among the Mande, for example, there was the principle of fadenya, meaning "father-childness." Fadenya is the cultural principle of the innovator, the one who rebels against social order, and the one who travels "to foreign lands to gain special powers and rewards that are eventually brought back for the benefit of the village." The rebels are the ones who are considered heroes.

By the time the African slaves arrived, the Indians already had experience as escapees. The Indians who escaped retreated to the nearby swamps, and some even remained in the city, literally hiding in plain sight. They were well organized and heavily armed. It comes as no surprise that the Africans and Native Americans banded together to escape, and steal food, supplies, and weapons. They organized to raid settlers for more supplies and wreaked all kinds of havoc for their masters and the colony. The colonizers feared a great uprising by the joining together of these two populations, and with good reason. By 1729, the Natchez, in cooperation with recently arrived Africans, wiped out the entire tobacco settlement of the Company of the Indes, which had been in control of the colony along with approximately one-tenth of the French population. By 1731, the Company of the Indes officially turned its Louisiana concession over to France.

Undoubtedly, the French and the British allied with the various Indian nations and used these alliances to their benefit. They used slaves in battles that would turn African against Indian, Indian against African, and Indian nation against Indian nation. They dangled the carrot of freedom as incentive for alliance with both groups. They played upon the preexisting intertribal conflicts among Indian tribes. Arming slaves in any great number made the colonizers even more nervous, but they needed their assistance to achieve the goal of maintaining control over the colony.

The gumbo of cultures that comprised colonial Louisiana included people of French, Canadian, Spanish, Latin American, Anglo, German, Irish, English, Scottish, Jewish, Native American, and African descent. In addition to joining the Native Americans, the first African slaves also encountered the social rejects from France who were exiled to New Orleans, many of whom were made into indentured servants. France and Spain were fighting over Mobile and Pensacola, leading to mass desertions among French and Swiss soldiers. Consequently, New Orleans was comprised largely of rejects, deserters, and African and Indian slaves. The shared desperation among the diverse groups of people led to a degree of cooperation that seemingly transcended status and race.

Eventually, France was defeated in the French and Indian War and abandoned North America. New Orleans and the west bank of the Mississippi were ceded to Spain. During the years of Spanish rule (1763 to 1803), the white population almost doubled and the slave population grew 250 percent.

In 1803, the United States purchased the Louisiana territory. Shortly after this time, there were several influxes of immigrants from St. Domingue (Haiti); the first consisting of an estimated one thousand refugees. According to Debien and le Gaedeur, another nine thousand refugees arrived indirectly from St. Domingue via Cuba in 1809. While some of these refugees settled in New Orleans, most of them made their homes west of the Atchafalaya Basin in St. Martinville and the surrounding area. Because of the large number of Haitians settling in this area, it became known as le Petit Paris, as residents attempted to recreate their lives as they had been in St. Domingue. Undoubtedly, the spirits followed the refugees, and thus we can see how some of them became part of the New Orleans Voodoo pantheon.

From 1719 to about 1830, Voodoo in New Orleans was much like it was in Africa. The main difference was a merging of the different African cultures and region-specific religious practices. But the languages, dances, and traditions were decidedly African. The direct influence of African tradition, however, was eventually cut off when the importation of slaves from outside of the United States became illegal in 1808.

The Creole phase is marked by the convergence of distinctly different cultures, the loss of African languages, and the development of the Creole language. This phase was in high gear during the years between 1830 to 1930, when Voodoo peaked in cultural influence. The Creole language became the primary language, the African rhythms of Voodoo dances gave birth to jazz, and Voodoo Queens emerged. Gris gris continued as a system of coping with the daily problems of life. Voodoo rituals merged with Mardi Gras and other celebrations to the point that many activities that were Voodoo in origin went unnoticed by the ordinary person. New Orleans Voodoo had integrated elements of European folk magick, Native American spirituality and herbalism, African Voodoo, and Catholicism. Catholic saints took a prominent place in New Orleans Voodoo at this time, masking, but not replacing, the loas of the traditional African Voodoo religion.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from THE VOODOO HOODOO SPELLBOOK by DENISE ALVARADO. Copyright © 2011 Denise Alvarado. Excerpted by permission of Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword          

Disclaimer and Legal Notice          

Introduction          

Chapter 1: The Basics          

Chapter 2: The Voodoo Pantheon          

Chapter 3: The Saints          

Chapter 4: Prayers, Novenas, and Psalms          

Chapter 5: Prepare to Mesmerize: Tools, Materia Medica, and Curios          

Chapter 6: Candle Magick          

Chapter 7: Conjure, Spiritual, and Anointing Oils          

Chapter 8: Magickal Voodoo Inks          

Chapter 9: Floor Washes          

Chapter 10: Spiritual Waters and Colognes          

Chapter 11: Spiritual Baths          

Chapter 12: New Orleans Gris Gris          

Chapter 13: Sachet Powders          

Chapter 14: Talismans          

Chapter 15: The Spells          

Final Note from the Author          

References and Bibliography          

Resources and Suppliers          

Index          


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 20 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 2, 2011

    A must have!

    I have to say that Denise Alvarado has out done herself with this one. Denise has a style of writing that is very informative and keeps you interested at the same time. It's as if she's talking directly to you. Truly a wealth of information and a great investment for anyone interested in the subject of Voodoo Hoodoo. Thank you Denise!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    come on people, stop leaving junk comments.  i love denise alvar

    come on people, stop leaving junk comments.  i love denise alvarado's books !! the first print edition of this book is very valuable.if you have it hang onto it !! 

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2013

    A great beginning and a wonderful collection

    Ms. Alvarado has brought together a wonderful amalgamation of works from various people and various sources. She adds her own insight into this as one who was raised in the New Orleans traditions, some with decidedly new age feel, but most with genuine folk parapsychological intuitiveness.

    She states up front that this is a compendium, not solely her own works. She gives credit where credit is due, and while I'm not entirely certain if she received permission from all of these sources, those who say that she "stole" all of the material have a serious chip on their collective shoulders...unless they are the authors of some of these works that Denise has gleaned the knowledge from, in which case they should really bring that up with her in private instead of airing their own dirty laundry publicly.

    That said, some of the listings I found to be a bit vague, and the "spreadsheets" for lack of a better term seemed too cut & dried for my liking. It was almost a "do this thing, this way, and ONLY this way, with ONLY these things" with no room for individualized interpretation. Nevertheless, it's a good "jumping off point" for those just getting into rootwork - a sort of Hoodoo 101, so to speak.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2014

    Geeks

    What a bunch of harry potter geeks

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2013

    Hehe

    Hehe GAY!!!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Cathy McDan

    Name: Cathy McDan //
    Gender: Female //
    Age: 17 //
    Year: 6 //
    Zodiac: Cancer the Crab //
    Nationality: Canadian, moved to Britain as a baby //
    Birthday: July 1 //
    Pet: Maine Coon with amber eyes, named Champlain //
    House: Ravenclaw //
    Birthplace: Regina, Saskatchewan //
    Fav. Class: Charms //
    Fav. Colour: Lime Green //
    Fav. Animal: Cat //
    Parents: Unknown, raised by aunt and uncle //
    Fav. Book Series: Warrior Cats //
    Fav. BBC Show: Dr. Who //
    Fav. Saying: "Most people assume that time is a strick progression of cause to effect, but actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it is really a big ball of wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff." ~Dr. Who //
    Quidditch Position: Beater //
    Fav. Food: French meat pie //
    Wand: 19 inches, sturdy, Birch, dragon heart-strings, no pattern //
    Broom: Firebolt //
    Siggy: Cat

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Rose

    Rose Hermione Weasly.
    Mother and father~Hermione and Roland Weasly.
    Pet:Cat Ginger.
    Looks like: brown hair and medium sized pretty and smart very popular.
    Wand: same as Hermiones

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Amber & Willow

    NAME: Amber Hermione Granger AGE: 11 YEAR: First HOUSE: Gryffindor DESCRIPTION: Light skin, curly caramel hair, bright green eyes. Looks exactly like her sister Willow except for she has curly hair WAND: Holly with unicorn hair FAMILY: Parents are Hugo Granger and Abigail Longbottom. Siblings are twin sister Willow BEST/FAVORITE CLASS: Divination CRUSH/BOYFRIEND: None PET: Pitch black she cat with blue eyes named Dawn PERSONALITY: Rather shy, very kind and will help anyone in need ******************NAME: Willow Luna Granger AGE: 11 YEAR: First HOUSE: Griffindor DESCRIPTION: Light skin, straight caramel colored hair, bright green eyes. Looks excatly like her sister Amber but has straight hair WAND: Willow bark and pheniox feather core FAMILY: Parents are Hugo Granger and Abigail Longbottom. Siblings are twin sister Amber BEST/FAVORITE CLASS: Charms CRUSH/BOYFRIEND: None PET: Snowy owl with amber eys named Echo PERSONALITY: Kind, and will always stand up for her sister. Outgoing, and the leader of the Granger children ~Amber Hermione and Willow Luna Granger

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Amy

    Name: Amy Rayyne *** Year: One*** House: Hufflepuff*** Looks: Long red hair, blue eyes. *** Personality: Friendly, smart, shy.***Pet: Cookies, a black and white kitten. ***

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Tessa

    NAME: Tessa Brooks HOUSE: Ravenclaw AGE: 12 (First year) PET: Holly, a dark brown cat with forest green eyes WAND: Sycamore, flexible, has a braided swirled look, phoenix feather core, 13 inches QUIDDITCH: Team Captain and Seeker LOOKS: Wavy brown hair to shoulders, electric blue eyes, pale skin, freckles on nose PERSONALITY: Smart, hyper at certain times, caring, sometimes reserved, shy until you get to know

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Brandon

    Name:Brandon Gorde Anison House:Ravenclaw Wand: 11 inches holly with unicorn hair Patronus:unkown

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    David Arthur Weasley

    Age:12. Looks: like his uncle Ron. Wand: 16in. pine unicorn hair. Year:2. House: Gryffindor.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Max

    Name: max redner. Age: 15. House is Gryffindor. Description: tall skinney with lught blonde hair and ice ocean eyes. Wand: long and strait made of hawk bones and wood.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Anthony wardned

    Age:15 Year:4 looks: tall with brow hair and has green eyes. Wand: 10 dark oak with a phoenix feather core. House:Hufflepuff

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Jasmine

    Full name: jasmine nicole gertrude rosewood. Age: 16. Description: a tall, light skinned girl with long, straight, jet black hair. House: gryffindor, but was a close call to ravenclaw. Personality: kind, funny, extremely smart, brace, outstanding and awesome. Wand: sixteen inch oak with unicorn tail and pheonix feather core.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Aislynn and xander

    Name:Aislynn Victoria O'Halley. House:Gryffindor. Year: six. Looks: long curly blonde hair goedown to her waistlast six inches is blue. Blue eyes. Personality: brave courageous kind will protect anyone who need protecting. Wand: 14 inch dark hickory dragon heartstring core. ~•~ Name: Xander Diggory. House: Hufflepuff. Year: six. Looks: just like his brother. Personality: kind funny daring. Wand: 16 inch oak pheonix tail feather core

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2013

    Peter

    Name: Peter Hale. Looks: Tall, skinny, with brown hair with white streaks at the bottom from when his brother dipped him in an aging potion. House: Slitherin. Wand: Rowan, slightly flexible, 9 inches, with a core of snakeskin and unicorn horndust.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    Hogwarys Classes

    Potions

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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