Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau / Edition 1

Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau / Edition 1

2.5 4
by Martha Ward
     
 

ISBN-10: 1578066298

ISBN-13: 9781578066292

Pub. Date: 03/11/2004

Publisher: University Press of Mississippi

Each year, thousands of pilgrims visit the celebrated New Orleans tomb where Marie Laveau is said to lie. They seek her favors or fear her lingering influence. Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau is the first study of the Laveaus, mother and daughter of the same name. Both were legendary leaders of religious and spiritual traditions many

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Overview

Each year, thousands of pilgrims visit the celebrated New Orleans tomb where Marie Laveau is said to lie. They seek her favors or fear her lingering influence. Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau is the first study of the Laveaus, mother and daughter of the same name. Both were legendary leaders of religious and spiritual traditions many still label as evil.

The Laveaus were free women of color and prominent French-speaking Catholic Creoles. From the 1820s until the 1880s when one died and the other disappeared, gossip, fear, and fierce affection swirled about them. From the heart of the French Quarter, in dance, drumming, song, and spirit possession, they ruled the imagination of New Orleans.

How did the two Maries apply their "magical" powers and uncommon business sense to shift the course of love, luck, and the law? The women understood the real crime—they had pitted their spiritual forces against the slave system of the United States. Moses-like, they led their people out of bondage and offered protection and freedom to the community of color, rich white women, enslaved families, and men condemned to hang.

The curse of the Laveau family, however, followed them. Both loved men they could never marry. Both faced down the press and police who stalked them. Both countered the relentless gossip of curses, evil spirits, murders, and infant sacrifice with acts of benevolence.

The book is also a detective story—who is really buried in the famous tomb in the oldest "city of the dead" in New Orleans? What scandals did the Laveau family intend to keep buried there forever? By what sleight of hand did free people of color lose their cultural identity when Americans purchased Louisiana and imposed racial apartheid upon Creole creativity? Voodoo Queen brings the improbable testimonies of saints, spirits, and never-before-printed eyewitness accounts of ceremonies and magical crafts together to illuminate the lives of the two Marie Laveaus, leaders of a major, indigenous American religion.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578066292
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
Publication date:
03/11/2004
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
368,126
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.78(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Table of Contents

Introduction: At the Beginning
Ch. 1Who in Heaven or Hell, Africa or France, Was Marie Laveau?3
Ch. 2Catholic in the Morning, Voodoo by Night21
Ch. 3Working Wife, Widow, Mistress, and Voodoo Divorcee34
Ch. 4Marie Laveau Brings the New Orleans Saints to Town49
Ch. 5Color Schemes and Protection Policies on St. Ann Street65
Ch. 6Freedom a la Mode, a la Marie78
Ch. 7Life in the Cities of the Dead93
Ch. 8At the Altar of Love and Luck108
Ch. 9Madame Laveau's Prayers, Poisons, and Political Pull123
Ch. 10How John, the Devil, and Mam'zelle Marie Hoodooed the Media140
Ch. 11A Tale of Two Sisters154
Ch. 12The Last Queen of the Voodoos Returns from the Dead171
Postscript: Events in the Lives of the Marie Laveaus191
Notes196
Sources226
At the End: In Recognition and Respect238
Index241

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Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau Voodoo Queen: the Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau is a study of the life of Marie Laveau, the legendary voodoo queen, and of the Creole lifestyle and history of New Orleans, Louisiana. Author Martha Ward writes her book in almost story form, making it an easy and enjoyable read. She discusses the lifestyles of the various social classes throughout the history of New Orleans. For instance, she explains that during the lifetime of Marie Laveau, many European Americans took Africans and Native Americans to be their slaves or mistresses. The author thoroughly explains how the idea of race and color follows a set of categories in New Orleans that differ from any other part of the country. The book also discusses how New Orleans Voodoo developed through a blend of Catholic and African traditions and how Marie Laveau came to be known as 'Sainte Marie' and the ¿Good Mother¿ who brings safety to the city. Overall, the book succeeds in analyzing historical records and legends of Marie Laveau in a way that leaves the reader with a greater appreciation of the rich culture and history of New Orleans.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is poorly written or maybe just poorly advertised I was looking for a book about the Mystery and Unknown about Marie Laveau and the south I was more excited about the short visit Andrew Zimmer did.This sounded like it would be a good read but there is nothing exciting or spooky about it I feel like it is a documentary and I am being made to read as a school project.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One word, "Crayfish". Yes this is a real word, but I have never heard anyone in New Orleans or the state of Louisiana use it. For all the research she is claiming to have done, and for working in New Orleans, it seems she would know the locals use the word "Crawfish". This one little error says a lot about her research and what she knows about New Orleans. Another author romanticizing a city and era they know nothing about.