The Voyage Home

The Voyage Home

4.5 2
by Jane Rogers
     
 

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Dark and brooding, The Voyage Home is ultimately redemptive in Jane Rogers strong hand; it is a devastatingly intuitive exploration of the relationships and actions that make us who we are and that force us to become who we want to be.
Anne, a woman in her 30s, is bringing home the body of her missionary father, David, who has died suddenly in Nigeria. She has

Overview

Dark and brooding, The Voyage Home is ultimately redemptive in Jane Rogers strong hand; it is a devastatingly intuitive exploration of the relationships and actions that make us who we are and that force us to become who we want to be.
Anne, a woman in her 30s, is bringing home the body of her missionary father, David, who has died suddenly in Nigeria. She has decided to take the long way home, by container ship, to help her come to terms with his death. What she has not reckoned with though is that she gets involved both with two stowaways (clandestinely) and the ship's mate (sexually) and that the journey will end in murder. Nor, for that matter, that reading her father’s diaries will reveal that she has an illegitimate sibling, whose fate her father was seeking when he died and whom she too must attempt to find in order to make peace with herself. In The Voyage Home, Jane Rogers Takes important contemporary themes (immigration, colonialism) and uses them as a basis for a profound and page-turning novel.

Editorial Reviews

Susan Adams
In evocative prose, Rogers paints a complicated, psychologically insightful picture of a damaged woman's effort to move on with her life.
The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
The measured pace of Rogers's narrative is perfectly suited to the brooding style of this psychological exploration of past sins and present-day guilt. Anne Harrington's missionary father has died in Africa, so the 37-year-old schoolteacher leaves London to oversee the final disposition of his affairs. Duties completed, Anne returns home via container ship-a journey that will take several weeks-because she needs the time "to find out what she feels" about his death. Onboard, she begins the ill-advised task of reading the journal he kept in the 1960s when he and her mother first moved to Nigeria. His entries reveal disconcerting secrets that open a chasm between Anne's memories and the written record. Then a stowaway beseeches Anne to help him and his pregnant wife. Anne ignores her gut feelings, does what she thinks is best for the couple and is plunged headlong into a complicated eddy of murder and deception over which she has no control. While Rogers creates a first-rate parallel between the settlement of Anne's internal conflict and the resolution of the issues aboard ship, the novel's conclusion is disappointingly flat. Still, this is a lusciously written tale, rich in emotional nuance. Agent, Georges Borchardt. (July) FYI: Rogers's previous novels have won several awards, including the Orange Prize (Island) and the Somerset Maugham Award (Her Living Image). Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another well-researched psychologically astute novel from Rogers (Island, 2000, etc.). An intriguing counterpoint is set up here between the present and the past. In 1999, Anne Harrington is taking the body of her father, a vicar, by ship from Nigeria to England for burial; and, while aboard the ship, she reads her father's Nigeria journals, set in the early 1960s, when he was a missionary there. Wandering at night on the ship, Anne discovers Joseph, a Nigerian stowaway, who leads her to his deathly ill pregnant wife and begs her to keep their presence secret. Anne's naivete leads to disastrous results. She tries to help, giving the woman antibiotics and enlisting the first mate-who, seizing upon his advantage, beds her and then tells her the whole crew knows she is a "slag." Shamed, and with no recourse, she's incapable of finding out what has happened to the woman and her unborn child; all she knows is that crew members hate stowaways because they're fined if a ship is found carrying them. Anne doesn't reveal where Joseph is, and hopes that he has survived the voyage. Meanwhile, in her father's journal, she discovers his secrets: after she was born, he had gotten a Nigerian woman pregnant and been removed from his position; her mother had had an affair with his boss; this is why he never visited them after the divorce. Given a second chance, he ends up in Biafra, caring for the mangled soldiers and starving children of the civil war. Back home in England, Anne is able to track down Joseph, who has indeed made it to England, but he wants nothing to do with her. Filled with guilt, she suffers a breakdown. In a final twist, four years later, she ends up married, submissive once again, andstruggling to bear a child. In her father's journal, she discovers a final secret: on his last day alive, her father learned that his Nigerian daughter had been sold into prostitution in Italy. A complex story exploring the moral repercussions of acting or not acting.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316726719
Publisher:
Little, Brown & Company
Publication date:
01/01/2004
Pages:
388
Product dimensions:
5.63(w) x 8.78(h) x 1.18(d)

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Voyage Home 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
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