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Voyager (Outlander Series #3) [NOOK Book]

Overview

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Diana Gabaldon's Drums of Autumn.

From the author of the breathtaking bestsellers Outlander and Dragonfly in Amber, the extraordinary saga continues.

Their passionate encounter happened long ago by whatever measurement Claire Randall took. Two decades before, she had traveled back in time and into the arms of a gallant ...
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Voyager (Outlander Series #3)

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Overview

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Diana Gabaldon's Drums of Autumn.

From the author of the breathtaking bestsellers Outlander and Dragonfly in Amber, the extraordinary saga continues.

Their passionate encounter happened long ago by whatever measurement Claire Randall took. Two decades before, she had traveled back in time and into the arms of a gallant eighteenth-century Scot named Jamie Fraser. Then she returned to her own century to bear his child, believing him dead in the tragic battle of Culloden. Yet his memory has never lessened its hold on her... and her body still cries out for him in her dreams.

Then Claire discovers that Jamie survived. Torn between returning to him and staying with their daughter in her own era, Claire must choose her destiny. And as time and space come full circle, she must find the courage to face the passion and pain awaiting her...the deadly intrigues raging in a divided Scotland... and the daring voyage into the dark unknown that can reunite—or forever doom—her timeless love.

Gabaldon mesmerized readers with a love story that spanned two centuries in Outlander and Dragonfly in Amber. This new novel in Gabaldon's highly acclaimed time-travel saga again features intrepid time traveler Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser, the gallant 18th-century Scottish clansman who stole Claire's heart and whose memory will not loosen its hold on her, even across the chasm of centuries.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This triumphant conclusion to Gabaldon's time-travel trilogy was a PW bestseller.
Library Journal
Time traveler Claire Randall first encountered Jamie Fraser, the fiery 18th-century Scottish clansman, in Outlander (Delacorte, 1991). The lovers continued their relationship in the best-selling Dragonfly in Amber (Delacorte, 1992). Now, in Voyager , Claire decides to return to the 18th century to reunite with her beloved.
Roland Green
The third of Gabaldon's novels featuring the time-traveling heroine Claire Randall covers her reunion with her twentieth-century husband, the birth of her daughter by eighteenth-century Scots clansman Jamie Fraser, and her training as a doctor. In due course, she feels driven to essay time traveling again, but reunion with Jamie takes place on the eve of Culloden. The pair's subsequent flight for life takes them to the West Indies and, finally, to a hair-raising shipwreck in the American colonies that hints there may be a fourth volume of Claire's adventures. Gabaldon handles the time-travel elements competently but subordinates them to classic historical romance--a big one, luxuriantly detailed and featuring highly appealing characters and an authentic feel to the background that speaks well of her research and writing. Recommended wherever Outlander and A Dragonfly in Amber found an audience.
From the Publisher
“Triumphant ... Her use of historical detail and a truly adult love story confirm Gabaldon as a superior writer.”—Publishers Weekly

“An amazing read.”—Arizona Tribune

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440335153
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/26/2004
  • Series: Outlander Series , #3
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 259
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Diana  Gabaldon
Diana Gabaldon is the New York Times bestselling author of Lord John and the Private Matter and the wildly popular Outlander novels. She won a 2006 Quill Award for her most recent Outlander novel, A Breath of Snow and Ashes.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Biography

To millions of fans, Diana Gabaldon is the creator of a complex, original, and utterly compelling amalgam of 18th-century romantic adventure and 20th-century science fiction. To the publishing industry, she's a grassroots-marketing phenomenon. And to would-be writers everywhere who worry that they don't have the time or expertise to do what they love, Gabaldon is nothing short of an inspiration.

Gabaldon wrote her first novel while juggling the demands of motherhood and career: in between her job as an ecology professor, she also had a part-time gig writing freelance software reviews. Gabaldon had never written fiction before, and didn't intend to publish this first novel, which she decided to call Outlander. This, she decided, would be her "practice novel". Worried that she might not be able to pull a plot and characters out of thin air, she settled on a historical novel because "it's easier to look things up than to make them up entirely."

The impulse to set her novel in 18th-century Scotland didn't stem -- as some fans have assumed—from a desire to explore her own familial roots (in fact, Gabaldon isn't even Scottish). Rather, it came from watching an episode of the British sci-fi series Dr. Who and becoming smitten with a handsome time traveler in a kilt. A time-travel element crept into Gabaldon's own book only after she realized her wisecracking female lead couldn't have come from anywhere but the 20th century. The resulting love affair between an intelligent, mature, sexually experienced woman and a charismatic, brave, virginal young man turned the conventions of historical romance upside-down.

Gabaldon has said her books were hard to market at first because they were impossible to categorize neatly. Were they historical romances? Sci-fi adventure stories? Literary fiction? Whatever their genre (Gabaldon eventually proffered the term "historical fantasias"), they eventually found their audience, and it turned out to be a staggeringly huge one.

Even before the publication of Outlander, Gabaldon had an online community of friends who'd read excerpts and were waiting eagerly for more. (In fact, her cohorts at the CompuServe Literary Forum helped hook her up with an agent.) Once the book was released, word kept spreading, both on the Internet and off, and Gabaldon kept writing sequels. (When her fourth book, "Drums of Autumn," was released, it debuted at No. 1 on the Wall Street Journal bestseller list, and her publisher, Delacorte, raced to add more copies to their initial print run of 155,000.)

With her books consistently topping the bestseller lists, it's apparent that Gabaldon's appeal lies partly in her ability to bulldoze the formulaic conventions of popular fiction. Salon writer Gavin McNett noted approvingly, "She simply doesn't pay attention to genre or precedent, and doesn't seem to care that identifying with Claire puts women in the role of the mysterious stranger, with Jamie -- no wimp in any regard -- as the romantic 'heroine."'

In between Outlander novels, Gabaldon also writes historical mysteries featuring Lord John Grey, a popular, if minor, character from the series, and is working on a contemporary mystery series. Meanwhile, the author's formidable fan base keeps growing, as evidenced by the expanding list of Gabaldon chat rooms, mailing lists, fan clubs and web sites -- some of them complete with fetching photos of red-haired lads in kilts.

Good To Know

Outlander may have been Gabaldon's first novel, but she was already a published writer. Her credits included scholarly articles, political speeches, radio ads, computer manuals and Walt Disney comic books.

Gabaldon gets 30 to 40 e-mails a day from her fans, who often meet online to discuss her work. "I got one letter from a woman who had been studying my book jacket photos (with a magnifying glass, evidently), who demanded to know why there was a hole in my pants," wrote Gabaldon on her web site. "This strikes me as a highly metaphysical question, which I am not equipped to answer, but which will doubtless entertain some chat-groups for quite a long time."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Diana Jean Gabaldon (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Flagstaff, Arizona
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 11, 1952
    2. Place of Birth:
      Flagstaff, Arizona
    1. Education:
      B.S., Northern Arizona University, 1973; M.S., Scripps Oceanographic Institute; Ph.D., Northern Arizona University, 1979
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

INVERNESS
MAY 2 , 1968

Of course he’s dead!’’ Claire’s voice was sharp with agitation; it rang loudly in the half-empty study, echoing among the rifled bookshelves. She stood against the cork-lined wall like a prisoner awaiting a firing squad, staring from her daughter to Roger Wakefield and back again.

‘‘I don’t think so.’’ Roger felt terribly tired. He rubbed a hand over his face, then picked up the folder from the desk; the one containing all the research he’d done since Claire and her daughter had first come to him, three weeks before, and asked his help. He opened the folder and thumbed slowly through the contents. The Jacobites of Culloden. The Rising of the ’45. The gallant Scots who had rallied to the banner of Bonnie Prince Charlie, and cut through Scotland like a blazing sword—only to come to ruin and defeat against the Duke of Cumberland on the gray moor at Culloden. ‘‘Here,’’ he said, plucking out several sheets clipped together. The archaic writing looked odd, rendered in the black crispness of a photocopy. ‘‘This is the muster roll of the Master of Lovat’s regiment.’’

He thrust the thin sheaf of papers at Claire, but it was her daughter, Brianna, who took the sheets from him and began to turn the pages, a slight frown between her reddish brows.

‘‘Read the top sheet,’’ Roger said. ‘‘Where it says ‘Officers.’ ’’

‘‘All right. ‘Officers,’ ’’ she read aloud, ‘‘ ‘Simon, Master of Lovat’ . . .’’

‘‘The Young Fox,’’ Roger interrupted. ‘‘Lovat’s son. And five more names, right?’’

Brianna cocked one brow at him, but went on reading.

‘‘ ‘William Chisholm Fraser, Lieutenant; George D’Amerd Fraser Shaw, Captain; Duncan Joseph Fraser, Lieutenant; Bayard Murray Fraser, Major,’’ she paused, swallowing, before reading the last name, ‘‘ ‘. . . James Alexander
Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser. Captain.’ ’’ She lowered the papers, looking a little pale. ‘‘My father.’’

Claire moved quickly to her daughter’s side, squeezing the girl’s arm. She was pale, too.

‘‘Yes,’’ she said to Roger. ‘‘I know he went to Culloden. When he left me . . . there at the stone circle . . . he meant to go back to Culloden Field, to rescue his men who were with Charles Stuart. And we know he did’’—she nodded at the folder on the desk, its manila surface blank and innocent in the lamplight—‘‘you found their names. But . . . but . . . Jamie . . .’’

Speaking the name aloud seemed to rattle her, and she clamped her lips tight.

Now it was Brianna’s turn to support her mother.

‘‘He meant to go back, you said.’’ Her eyes, dark blue and encouraging, were intent on her mother’s face. ‘‘He meant to take his men away from the field, and then go back to the battle.’’ Claire nodded, recovering herself slightly.

‘‘He knew he hadn’t much chance of getting away; if the English caught him . . . he said he’d rather die in battle. That’s what he meant to do.’’ She turned to Roger, her gaze an unsettling amber. Her eyes always reminded him of hawk’s eyes, as though she could see a good deal farther than most people. ‘‘I can’t believe he didn’t die there—so many men did, and
he meant to!’’

Almost half the Highland army had died at Culloden, cut down in a blast of cannonfire and searing musketry. But not Jamie Fraser. ‘‘No,’’ Roger said doggedly. ‘‘That bit I read you from Linklater’s book—’’ He reached to pick it up, a white volume, entitled The Prince in the Heather.

‘‘Following the battle,’’ he read,
‘‘eighteen wounded Jacobite officers took refuge in the farmhouse near the moor. Here they lay in pain, their wounds untended, for two days. At the end of that time, they were taken out and shot. One man, a Fraser of the Master of Lovat’s regiment, escaped the slaughter. The rest are buried at the edge of the domestic park.

‘‘See?’’ he said, laying the book down and looking earnestly at the two women over its pages. ‘‘An officer, of the Master of Lovat’s regiment.’’ He grabbed up the sheets of the muster roll. ‘‘And here they are! Just six of them. Now, we know the man in the farmhouse can’t have been Young Simon; he’s a well-known historical figure, and we know very well what happened to him. He retreated from the field— unwounded, mind you—with a group of his men, and fought his way north, eventually making it back to Beaufort Castle, near here.’’ He waved vaguely at the full-length window, through which the nighttime lights of Inverness twinkled faintly.

‘‘Nor was the man who escaped Leanach farmhouse any of the other four officers—William, George, Duncan, or Bayard,’’ Roger said. ‘‘Why?’’ He snatched another paper out of the folder and brandished it, almost triumphantly. ‘‘Because they all did die at Culloden! All four of them were killed on the field—I found their names listed on a plaque in the church at Beauly.’’

Claire let out a long breath, then eased herself down into the old leather swivel chair behind the desk.

‘‘Jesus H. Christ,’’ she said. She closed her eyes and leaned forward, elbows on the desk, and her head against her hands, the thick, curly brown hair spilling forward to hide her face. Brianna laid a hand on Claire’s back, face troubled as she bent over her mother. She was a tall girl, with large, fine bones, and her long red hair glowed in the warm light of the desk lamp.

‘‘If he didn’t die . . .’’ she began tentatively.

Claire’s head snapped up. ‘‘But he is dead!’’ she said. Her face was strained, and small lines were visible around her eyes. ‘‘For God’s sake, it’s two hundred years; whether he died at Culloden or not, he’s dead now!’’

Brianna stepped back from her mother’s vehemence, and lowered her head, so the red hair—her father’s red hair—swung down beside her cheek.

‘‘I guess so,’’ she whispered. Roger could see she was fighting back tears. And no wonder, he thought. To find out in short order that first, the man you had loved and called ‘‘Father’’ all your life really
wasn’t your father, secondly, that your real father was a Highland Scot who had lived two hundred years ago, and thirdly, to realize that he had likely perished in some horrid fashion, unthinkably far from the wife and child he had sacrificed himself to save . . . enough to rattle one, Roger thought.

He crossed to Brianna and touched her arm. She gave him a brief, distracted glance, and tried to smile. He put his arms around her, even in his pity for her distress thinking how marvelous she felt, all warm and soft and springy at once.

Claire still sat at the desk, motionless. The yellow hawk’s eyes had gone a softer color now, remote with memory. They rested sightlessly on the east wall of the study, still covered from floor to ceiling with the notes and memorabilia left by the Reverend Wakefield, Roger’s late adoptive father. Looking at the wall himself, Roger saw the annual meeting notice sent by the Society of the White Rose—those enthusiastic, eccentric souls who still championed the cause of Scottish independence, meeting in nostalgic tribute to Charles Stuart, and the Highland heroes who had followed him.

Roger cleared his throat slightly.

‘‘Er . . . if Jamie Fraser didn’t die at Culloden . . .’’ he said.

‘‘Then he likely died soon afterward.’’ Claire’s eyes met Roger’s, straight on, the cool look back in the yellow-brown depths. ‘‘You have no idea how it was,’’ she said. ‘‘There was a famine in the Highlands—none of the men had eaten for days before the battle. He was wounded—we know that. Even if he escaped, there would have been . . . no one to care for him.’’ Her voice caught slightly at that; she was a doctor now, had been a healer even then, twenty years before, when she had stepped through a circle of standing stones, and met destiny with James Alexander Malcolm MacKenzie Fraser. Roger was conscious of them both; the tall, shaking girl he held in his arms, and the woman at the desk, so still, so poised. She had traveled through the stones, through time; been suspected as a spy, arrested as a witch, snatched by an unimaginable quirk of circumstance from the arms of her first husband, Frank Randall. And three years later, her second husband, James Fraser, had sent her back through the stones, pregnant, in a desperate effort to save her and the unborn child from the onrushing disaster that would soon engulf him.

Surely, he thought to himself, she’s been through enough? But Roger was a historian. He had a scholar’s insatiable, amoral curiosity, too powerful to be constrained by simple compassion. More than that, he was oddly conscious of the third figure in the family tragedy in which he found himself involved—Jamie Fraser.

‘If he didn’t die at Culloden,’’ he began again, more firmly, ‘‘then perhaps I can find out what did happen to him. Do you want me to try?’’ He waited, breathless, feeling Brianna’s warm breath through his shirt. Jamie Fraser had had a life, and a death. Roger felt obscurely that it was his duty to find out all the truth; that Jamie Fraser’s women deserved to know all they could of him. For Brianna, such knowledge was all she would ever have of the father she had never known. And for Claire—behind the question he had asked was the thought that had plainly not yet struck her, stunned with shock as she was: she had crossed the barrier of time twice before. She could, just possibly, do it again. And if Jamie Fraser had not died at Culloden . . .

He saw awareness flicker in the clouded amber of her eyes, as the thought came to her. She was normally pale; now her face blanched white as the ivory handle of the letter opener before her on the desk. Her fingers closed around it, clenching so the knuckles stood out in knobs of bone. She didn’t speak for a long time. Her gaze fixed on Brianna and lingered there for a moment, then returned to Roger’s face. ‘‘Yes,’’ she said, in a whisper so soft he could barely hear her. ‘‘Yes. Find out for me. Please. Find out.’’

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 1289 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1307 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    OUTSTANDING VOYAGE!!!

    While working at a bookstore, I decided that I needed to read one sci-fi and one romance novel just to get a feel for the genre. I selected Diana Gabaldon's "Outlander" for the romance novel, and was absolutely captivated by her story and style. I devoured the first three books in less than six weeks--an amazing feat for me as a slow reader with sight impairments--and have started at least 200 people on these books since then. I have had exactly two negative reactions.<BR/>Voyager, as I said above, is my favorite of all the books so far. In the last 300 pages or so, Gabaldon's plot moves at breathtaking speed, tying up many ends. The conclusion is stunning. In a year when real time/distance travel is curtailed by high gasoline prices, the "Outlander" series--and "Voyager" in particular--is a mental escape of the first order. If you need some place to go on your "staycation," I would strongly suggest Scotland in the mid-1700's, and a visit with Jamie and Clare Fraser. You won't be disappointed.

    31 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Review from One Book At A Time http://onebooktime.blogspot.com

    At the start of this book, I was afraid it wasn't going to live up to the first two. It took me awhile to figure out why I wasn't liking it as much. While I enjoyed learning about Jamie and Claire after they were separated, it's the two of them together that make this series so special. And then I realized that story of their 20 years apart is important too. As a reader we need to understand how much of an influence they had on one another. That even after 20 years (not to mention 2 centuries), they still hold those outstanding feelings for each other. But, I have to admit, that moment in the print shop was what I was waiting for! This book takes you on a ride. It's not stop action with all that heart stopping romance in between. It's suspenseful, and at times I really wondered if Jamie and/or Claire was going to get out of whatever situation they managed to find themselves in. It had some major shocks and twists in it, things that I was down right not expecting. And, at times I wondered if 20 years of separation was just too much to overcome. At the end of the story, I was left with a book that rivals my first love of Outlander! I was amazed at the story Diana Gabaldon has managed to create.

    14 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Timeless

    I stumbled upon Outlander several years ago and loved that lengthy novel. Jamie and Claire stayed in my mind and I often found myself, apropos of nothing, wondering whatever became of them. The love and friendship they felt for one another went far beyond that of the typical bodice ripper, and Gabaldon's details and (mostly) accurate portrayal of the 18th century were excellent.
    When I found Dragonfly in Amber I immediately began to devour it and have never been so moved by a sequel. Since it was several years after I read Outlander, the beginning scenes set in 1968 and the shifting narration felt a little disjointed and confusing. It began to flow, though, and once again I found myself captured by the tragedy and love in the two characters' lives. Throughout the book, I had a sense of foreboding and felt distraught at the thought that something might happen to separate these two. I had to skip to the last page (which I never do with books!) just to reassure myself. Even knowing the end, I found myself crying over the farewell scene (which I also never do with books!). I had to know immediately what happened so I bought Voyager and stayed up most of the night reading it.
    Voyager picks up almost exactly where DIA ended, with Claire learning that Jamie did not, in fact, die at Culloden. She continues her search for more information about what happened to him afterward, and this 20th century story is interwoven with the events occurring immediately after Claire went back through the stones. Reading a "Jamie-centric" perspective is a welcome change from the normal first person, as we follow him over the next years--from his living in a cave, to his imprisonment, to his fathering an illegitimate child. Overall, though, is the sense of loss and longing between the two and the love that has never ended. When Claire decides to go back to try to find him, it seems both irresponsible (leaving her daughter behind) and the only possible thing she can do. Gabaldon is wise enough to make these characters have new, unknown complexities upon their reunion, rather than sticking the same twenty-somethings into older bodies and expecting us to believe their feelings are exactly the same. Both are changed and wiser, and we experience the challenges of rediscovering each other alongside Jamie and Claire.
    Somewhere past the halfway mark, though, I began to grow restless. Yes, the life of an 18th century Jacobite traitor/smuggler/warrior is bound to be complex and difficult. But do we need to see them thrown into every possible adventure of the era? Do we need to watch them sail across the Atlantic to encounter the same set of people from their past? Do we really believe that Jamie is literally impossible to kill? In addition, many things are vague and left unexplained, such as why Jamie is suddenly the captain of French soldiers, and whether it's Jamie or another Highlander who is the cause of Miss Campbell's madness. In all, a timeless classic I highly recommend.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Third time's a charm!

    Voyager was just as addictive as the first two in the Outlander series! Not as totally indulgent as Outlander....but then again...there's nothing like the first...is there? With that being said, I was completely satisfied with the plot and the further development of the characters. She kept the main characters true and human. I also liked how Gabaldon decided to write about the 20 years in past tense versus taking us through the entire 20 years. Liked all of the new characters. There was still lots of adventure....although I noticed she lessened with the sex scenes; which I thought was appropriate. It made the few so much more enduring! Also, even though the characters are 20 years older their passions are just as true...which is true to life. I could honestly stop reading here (hah! fat chance) because of how Voyager ended. Although I must say a lot will have to do with the fact that I am totally sleep deprived and on the verge of a divorce (hehehe....slightly compulsive). My husband keeps saying "I can't believe I have 3 more books to go!" However, it's Christmas and if you can't read at Christmas when can you? I've started my husband on the 2nd book in the series and he is thoroughly hooked - job done! I will definitely be packing the light blue book for my road trip! Voyager is a great read!

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Beautiful Series

    While stoling through a bookstore, I decided that I needed to read one sci-fi and one romance novel just to get a feel for the genre. I selected Diana Gabaldon's "Outlander" for the romance novel, and was absolutely captivated by her story and style. I devoured the first three books in less than six weeks--an amazing feat for me as a slow reader--and have started at least a couple of dozen people on these books since then. I've had a couple of negative reactions.

    This is one of my favorite of all the books so far. In the last 300 pages or so, Gabaldon's plot moves at breathtaking speed, tying up many ends. The conclusion is stunning. The "Outlander" series--and "Voyager" in particular--is a mental escape from the chaos. If you need some place to visit I would strongly suggest Scotland in the mid-1700's, and a visit with Jamie and Clare Fraser. You won't be disappointed.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2010

    The Outlander series

    You have to read Outlander first, period. there is no other way to get into the character build. There are a lot of them not just Jamie and Claire. So it's hard to write a review of just this book. I will simply say it's a series you can't put down and wait with bookmark in hand for the next book. I just bought them all at once so as to avoid the wait. The characters are truly fascinating and you like them. You might not always like what they do but they are deeper than that and they carry you into their adventures and there are so many of them. These books transpose time and space, country to country and it is a testament to a true love story without all the simpering whimpering mush that sometimes accompanies a love story. These people come alive before your eyes and you hold them in your heart. This series is a must read. Diana Galbadon has done a wonderful job here of storytelling with a heart

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Outstanding

    This does not disappoint. Every bit as good as the previous books in the series. It moves along so smoothly that you're done before you know it and just want more. Claire is really with the right man in her life. She seems to get out of one scrape after another. I wish the next one, Drums of Autumn was a recorded audio book and all the rest in the series.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2007

    The Series Ends Here

    Sure I want to know what happens to all the characters I fell in love with from Outlander and Dragonfly in Amber but I don't want to slog though pages and pages of meandering plot lines and confusing characters. It seems like the character Clair has become an alter ego of Diana's. Who controls the LapTop at Mrs. Gabaldon's house? I would like to see Clair and Jamie sail away into the sunset and read a new series by this talented author. Message to Diana Gabaldon ¿ let your characters go and move on!

    4 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 31, 2010

    You will love this series-

    Out of all of the Outlander books, this was my least favorite. Not that is was bad it just didn't flow as well as the other books, in my opinion. I still needed to read it in order to know what was happening in order for me to continue with the series. It is hard to put this book series down. You will want to know what happens to Jamie, Claire and all the other amazing characters. This is a great book series with lots to think about. I love the time period. I am not usually interested in "time travel" but these books will capture you.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    WOW!!!

    Diana Gabaldon continues to blow me away with the novels she writes. The depth of feeling I have for her characters is unbelievable. I truly feel as if I know them, and love them as if they were family...

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    my favorite of the series

    Voyager was oddly my favorite book the series. I'm already on book 6 and I still look back to say that this was one of the best (besides the first book of course.) Reading about Jamie and Claire apart was surprisingly wonderful. You really get to see the characters struggle and suffer without each other and after the first 2 books I started taking it for granted that they would be together forever. Its just such an emotional book filled with great suspense and great adventure. Roger and Brianna make the book even more wonderful. They add extra twists and turns to the novel.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 11, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    My most favorite series ever.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2012

    This series is a must read

    Gabaldon has a wonderful way to spin a tale and develop her characters. When I finish one I begin another waiting to read about these "friends" of mine. Don't stop @ 3 keep reading to the end then start her lord john series.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2012

    Same great writing!

    I enjoyed this book just as much as I enjoyed the two before it! LOVE THAT JAIME!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    keeps you coming back for more

    I enjoyed the present time, back in time, then back to present time, of the story telling, from claire to her daughter and gellis's son, the researcher.
    it was a good jump to the next book, and according to research, it is good bit of work.
    love it and can't wait to see what's coming next.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    Fabulous!

    With perfect narration, characters that are bold and interesting, and a story that flows so easy you never want to stop listening, this installment of the Outlander series does not disappoint. I would recommend enjoying the books in order, as the main characters have a vast and complicated history, but even on its own I believe the story will delight any reader.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2010

    Escapism at its Best

    Davina Porter does a phenomenal job portraying the characters in this audio book. I've read the book itself, but her use of various voices for the different people, inflection and cadence make this a marvelous addition to the printed volume. I listened to the audio book after several readings of the book in print and was amazed to hear aspects to this story of drama, romance, adventure and action that I had never "heard" in any of my readings. I expect to listen to this over and over.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Almost as good as the first

    I love this Outlander book. I thought it was almost as good as the first one and much better than the second. It was faster paced and really easy to read. I recommend it to anyone who likes the other Outlander books or is thinking of reading them. It is a great series and well worth the length.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 21, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Simply loved it

    It seemed must faster paced than the first 2. I got through it far more quickly....I saw some poor ratings on this and I just had to put out there that if you liked the first 2 (I did, but thought they were slow) I see no reason why you won't love this one!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 3, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    LOVE THIS SERIES

    I read a review of this book while online at Barns and Noble. And I decided to try the first book Outlander. I was captivated from the beginning. The authors writing style is fantastic and I found myself unable to put this down! I found myself crying with Claire and wishing for a man like Jamie even with all his flaws. I have now read the whole series and I have found myself rereading it!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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