Voz d'Amor

Voz d'Amor

by Cesária Évora
     
 

Cape Verde's gift to international music, Cesaria Evora, returns with her most traditional-sounding effort since leaving the rarified Nonesuch label for the big leagues. The succeeding albums have played up the variegated roots of her homeland's music -- Portuguese fado, Afro-Caribbean lilt, Brazilian choro and samba, and English sea chanteys all play into the…  See more details below

Overview

Cape Verde's gift to international music, Cesaria Evora, returns with her most traditional-sounding effort since leaving the rarified Nonesuch label for the big leagues. The succeeding albums have played up the variegated roots of her homeland's music -- Portuguese fado, Afro-Caribbean lilt, Brazilian choro and samba, and English sea chanteys all play into the maritime blues of this stark outpost in the Atlantic. But Voz D'Amor turns down the Cuban string section, carnaval beats, and other distractions, leaving Cesaria's wonderfully understated voice to hold its own with just piano and cavaquinho. The set opens on a reverential note, with her reading of "Isolada," by the grand master of Cape Verdean song, B. Leza (who happens to be Cesaria's uncle). There's also a brace of songs by Teofilo Chantre, responsible for some of her biggest hits, who invokes the Brothers Four chestnut "Greenfields" in "Jardim Prometido" and the closer, "Voz D'Amor." This lush track pulls out all the stops, including accordion from Madagascar's Regis Gizavo, congas, and other Caribbean percussion. A decade after her early-'90s discovery in Paris, Cesaria shows that she hasn't been changed by her years in the spotlight: The elegant, melancholic mood sustained on Voz D'Amor makes for one of her most affecting recordings in a long time.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Steve Leggett
Césaria Évora, Cape Verde's "barefoot diva," has perfected her native morna style, and with her deep, soft-burred tenor, has gained an international audience for her blues-steeped laments. Voz d'Amor features several mornas, but up-tempo coladeras, as well, most notably the striking "Velocidade," written by Luis Morais, the father of modern Cape Verdean music, which spotlights a vocal choir and a lively lyrical clarinet line. But slow-burning, sad songs are Évora's specialty, and there are several striking examples here, including a cover of "Beijo Roubado," first recorded by Brazilian singer Ângela Maria. The opening track, "Isolada," a morna written by Évora's uncle, the poet B. Leza, features mandolin by Hamilton de Holanda and is perfectly suited to Évora's warm, honey-tinged voice. The single most striking track is the beautiful lament "Marde Canal," a traditional Cape Verde melody with lyrics from Fernando Andrade about the beauty and treachery of the sea channel between Sao Vicente and Santo Anton. Évora's vocal here is sad, resigned, and wise, by turns. Voz d'Amor is another fine collection from a remarkable singer.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/23/2003
Label:
Rca Victor
UPC:
0828765438025
catalogNumber:
54380
Rank:
34931

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