Waging War to Make Peace: U.S. Intervention in Global Conflicts

Overview

Written by a combat veteran who also served on the faculty of the Naval War College, Waging War to Make Peace: U.S. Intervention in Global Conflicts is a thought-provoking analysis of the decision to make war in the modern world. The subject is examined through the lens of the decision-making of four NATO nations—Britain, France, Germany, and the United States—in the 1999 Kosovo campaign compared to their decisions in 2003 regarding the Iraq war.

What emerges is a picture of how...

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Overview

Written by a combat veteran who also served on the faculty of the Naval War College, Waging War to Make Peace: U.S. Intervention in Global Conflicts is a thought-provoking analysis of the decision to make war in the modern world. The subject is examined through the lens of the decision-making of four NATO nations—Britain, France, Germany, and the United States—in the 1999 Kosovo campaign compared to their decisions in 2003 regarding the Iraq war.

What emerges is a picture of how the bitter dispute over Iraq was the result of disagreements about who has the authority to wage war, when it is justified, and whether nations have an obligation to intervene in the case of human rights and humanitarian emergencies. The book shows how those who enthusiastically hailed a new era of warfare based upon human rights and humanitarian values misjudged the significance of the Kosovo decision, and it underscores issues with which leaders must come to grips if NATO allies are to avoid broader disputes in the years ahead.

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What People Are Saying

Ian Johnstone
"Susan Yoshihara's book offers an illuminating perspective on an issue that has generated more heat than light in recent years: the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention. Drawing on Martin Wight's three traditions of international thought, she reflects on the relationship between law, politics and morality as played out in the debates over intervention in Kosovo and Iraq. Her account covers topics as diverse as the drivers of US foreign policy and NATO politics to the impact of values on international relations and the obligations states have to act in the face of human suffering. Sophisticated yet accessible to non-specialists, this thought-provoking book deserves to be read policy-makers, lawyers and theorists of world politics alike."
David Yost
"This remarkable book analyzes the debates in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States on the use of force in the 1999 Kosovo conflict and the 2003 Iraq war. The analysis is conducted within the framework of centuries-old traditions of thinking about how to justify and authorize the use of force, and about moral and legal obligations to intervene in defense of human rights. The result is a study of enduring merit. It maintains a focus on human dignity and humanitarian responsibilities, and it offers enlightening insights on continuing tensions among distinct views on national sovereignty, international law, and moral duties."
Ambassador John Bolton
"Susan Yoshihara has broken through the obfuscation surrounding 'humanitarian intervention' with this important analysis. Policy-makers and scholars alike will see new insights into the issues under debate. And the certainties that many see, erroneously, in international law and morality will never be the same again."
Ambassador John Bolton

"Susan Yoshihara has broken through the obfuscation surrounding 'humanitarian intervention' with this important analysis. Policy-makers and scholars alike will see new insights into the issues under debate. And the certainties that many see, erroneously, in international law and morality will never be the same again."

David Yost
"This remarkable book analyzes the debates in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States on the use of force in the 1999 Kosovo conflict and the 2003 Iraq war. The analysis is conducted within the framework of centuries-old traditions of thinking about how to justify and authorize the use of force, and about moral and legal obligations to intervene in defense of human rights. The result is a study of enduring merit. It maintains a focus on human dignity and humanitarian responsibilities, and it offers enlightening insights on continuing tensions among distinct views on national sovereignty, international law, and moral duties."
David Yost, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, author of NATO Transformed: the Alliance's New Roles in International Security
Ian Johnstone
"Susan Yoshihara's book offers an illuminating perspective on an issue that has generated more heat than light in recent years: the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention. Drawing on Martin Wight's three traditions of international thought, she reflects on the relationship between law, politics and morality as played out in the debates over intervention in Kosovo and Iraq. Her account covers topics as diverse as the drivers of US foreign policy and NATO politics to the impact of values on international relations and the obligations states have to act in the face of human suffering. Sophisticated yet accessible to non-specialists, this thought-provoking book deserves to be read policy-makers, lawyers and theorists of world politics alike."
Ian Johnstone, Professor of International Law, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

Ambassador John Bolton

"Susan Yoshihara has broken through the obfuscation surrounding 'humanitarian intervention' with this important analysis. Policy-makers and scholars alike will see new insights into the issues under debate. And the certainties that many see, erroneously, in international law and morality will never be the same again."

David Yost

"This remarkable book analyzes the debates in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States on the use of force in the 1999 Kosovo conflict and the 2003 Iraq war. The analysis is conducted within the framework of centuries-old traditions of thinking about how to justify and authorize the use of force, and about moral and legal obligations to intervene in defense of human rights. The result is a study of enduring merit. It maintains a focus on human dignity and humanitarian responsibilities, and it offers enlightening insights on continuing tensions among distinct views on national sovereignty, international law, and moral duties."

David Yost, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, author of NATO Transformed: the Alliance's New Roles in International Security

Ian Johnstone

"Susan Yoshihara's book offers an illuminating perspective on an issue that has generated more heat than light in recent years: the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention. Drawing on Martin Wight's three traditions of international thought, she reflects on the relationship between law, politics and morality as played out in the debates over intervention in Kosovo and Iraq. Her account covers topics as diverse as the drivers of US foreign policy and NATO politics to the impact of values on international relations and the obligations states have to act in the face of human suffering. Sophisticated yet accessible to non-specialists, this thought-provoking book deserves to be read policy-makers, lawyers and theorists of world politics alike."

Ian Johnstone, Professor of International Law, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780275999919
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/9/2010
  • Series: Praeger Security International Series
  • Pages: 230
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments ix

1 Introduction 1

2 Origins of Intervention: Power, Principle, and Law 9

3 The Quest for Legitimacy: Concepts and Context 25

4 The Boundaries of Multilateralism: Who May Authorize War? 49

5 Waging War to Save Lives: When Is Intervention Justified? 73

6 My Brother's Keeper: Are Nations Obligated to Intervene? 105

7 Debating the Iraq War: The Trouble with Mixed Motives 139

8 Conclusion 161

Notes 175

Bibliography 205

Index 221

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