Waiting for the Moon

Waiting for the Moon

4.0 1
by Tindersticks
     
 
If Brit-pop is best known for melancholy -- from the bracing rock of Radiohead to the tear-in-your-tea pop of Coldplay -- then Tindersticks could be its poster boys. With his stylistic and literary nods to Leonard Cohen and Nick Cave, frontman Stuart Staples possesses the kind of whiskey-informed baritone that can make fragile fans weak in the knees, and on

Overview

If Brit-pop is best known for melancholy -- from the bracing rock of Radiohead to the tear-in-your-tea pop of Coldplay -- then Tindersticks could be its poster boys. With his stylistic and literary nods to Leonard Cohen and Nick Cave, frontman Stuart Staples possesses the kind of whiskey-informed baritone that can make fragile fans weak in the knees, and on Tindersticks' sixth album, he deploys it well on gorgeously sad songs that are both comforting and discomfiting. Downplaying the Curtis Mayfield–era soul that cropped up on 2001's Can Our Love -- though it still suffuses the aching love song "Sweet Memory" and "My Oblivion" with a heartrending warmth -- the band settle into another set of darkly orchestrated guitar pop familiar as a worn wool sweater. After starting with the uplifting "Until the Morning Comes" ("My hands 'round your throat / If I kill you now, they'll never know," croons Staples), the disc reaches an early crescendo on "4:48 Psychosis," which finds the morose singer reading lines from the titular play, written by the late Sarah Kane. Typically, Staples carries Tindersticks' songs, but here his lines are nearly submerged in an escalating, Velvet Underground–like wave of intertwining electric guitars, propulsive rhythms, and swooning strings. A similar whirling dervish of sound -- squawking strings, a dreamy guitar line, and cacophonous horns -- fuels "Say Goodbye to the City," suggesting a Nick Cave arrangement, while Staples continues his tradition of weepy duets on the conversational "Sometimes It Hurts," where he trades verses with Lhasa de Sela. The whole album feels like one glorious comedown -- a sonically rich, emotionally draining experience that, oddly enough, compels revisiting.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Andy Kellman
The fact that Waiting for the Moon isn't much more than another addition to Tindersticks' discography will be enough to keep the devout fans pleased. At this stage in the band's existence, it is mightily impressive that a mediocre record has yet to slip out of the den. However, neither this nor Can Our Love... threatens, at any point, to rival Simple Pleasure -- let alone anything that preceded it. Apart from the increased vocal presence of arranger and multi-instrumentalist Dickon Hinchcliffe, who provides a much-needed bittersweetness to counter Stuart Staples' familiar warble, there's not much to add apart from the fact that numerous dimensions from the band's past are sprinkled throughout. So, even more so than before, the casual fans will have difficulty pinning down the minor differences and developments that distinguish this album from the one that came before it. "Say Goodbye to the City," similar to the most fiery moments of the band's first record, builds a dramatic, storming rush of rumbling rhythm, blaring guitars, droning strings, and demented Tijuana brass. Just the same, "4.48 Psychosis" is a noisily agitated spoken word piece that gleans from Sarah Kane's same-named play. Though "Sometimes It Hurts," an elegant duet with Lhasa de Sala, makes the album seem all the more like a trip through the past, the still-present soul influences that ran through the previous two albums seem more like a logical extension. Few bands can get away with being in a holding pattern like Tindersticks. When they remain this potent -- indicated from the very first lines of the album, "My hands 'round your throat/If I kill you now, well, they'll never know" -- it's all but impossible to wish for the band's end.
Blender - Todd Pruzan
The perfect introduction to Tindersticks' queasy, cinematic elegance.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/17/2003
Label:
Beggars Uk - Ada
UPC:
0607618023225
catalogNumber:
80232

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Tindersticks   Primary Artist
Dave Bishop   Baritone Saxophone
Terry Edwards   Trumpet
Gina Foster   Vocals
J. Neil Sidwell   Trombone
Steve Sidwell   Trumpet
Jamie Talbot   Tenor Saxophone
Lucy Wilkins   Violin
Calina de la Mare   Violin
Sara Wilson   Cello
Oliver Kraus   Cello
Dave Boulter   Group Member
Mark Colwill   Group Member
Howard Gott   Violin
Dickon Hinchliffe   Group Member
Rob Spriggs   Viola
Lhasa   Vocals
Neil Fraser   Group Member
Alasdair Macaulay   Group Member
Andy Nice   Cello
Becca Ware   Viola
Louise Peacock   Violin
Catherine Browning   Violin
Naomi Fairhurst   Viola
Fiona Brice   Violin
David E. Williams   Violin
Ian Burdge   Cello
Stuart Staples   Group Member
Jacqueline Norrie   Violin
Ruth Gottlieb   Violin
Chris Worsey   Cello
Brian G. Wright   Violin
Sophie Sarota   Viola
Gillon Cameron   Violin
Sarah Button   Violin
Reiad Chibah   Viola
Wendy DeSaint Paer   Violin
Emily Frith   Viola
Vincent Greene   Viola
Fiona Griffith   Viola
Christopher Koh   Violin
Chris Mansell   Cello
Colin McCan   Timpani
Anna Morris   Violin
Lucy Theo   Viola

Technical Credits

Tindersticks   Composer
Ian Caple   Producer
Dave Boulter   Composer
Dickon Hinchliffe   Composer,String Arrangements,Brass Arrangment
Stuart Staples   Composer,Producer
Suzanne Osborne   Cover Painting
Ian Cople   Producer

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Waiting for the Moon 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago