Waiting for the Sirens' Call

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Having taken a good long time to take stock -- it's been more than four years since their last outing -- the members of New Order have gone back to basics on this disc, eschewing the conventional lite rock of Get Ready in favor of the throbbing-yet-ethereal sounds of their heyday. Waiting for the Sirens' Call brims with songs that showcase the slinky sensuality that's made New Order such a touchstone for new-generation bands like the Killers and the Bravery -- particularly "Who's Joe," an archetypal example of Peter Hook's ability to carry a song on the four strings of his bass. The disc's soaring title track leans just as heavily on that bottom end but leavens the ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Having taken a good long time to take stock -- it's been more than four years since their last outing -- the members of New Order have gone back to basics on this disc, eschewing the conventional lite rock of Get Ready in favor of the throbbing-yet-ethereal sounds of their heyday. Waiting for the Sirens' Call brims with songs that showcase the slinky sensuality that's made New Order such a touchstone for new-generation bands like the Killers and the Bravery -- particularly "Who's Joe," an archetypal example of Peter Hook's ability to carry a song on the four strings of his bass. The disc's soaring title track leans just as heavily on that bottom end but leavens the proceedings with a particularly angelic lead vocal by Bernard Sumner, who's still able to nail that fallen-innocent tenor, even after all these years. There are moments when the band seem to sit back and reflect on that passage of time -- like "Hey Now What You Doing," which comes across as a sort of primer for wannabe debauchers -- but the most impressive thing about Sirens is the non-jaded attitude at its core. That sparkle, evident in the simply looped "Jetstream" featuring a guest spot by Ana Matronic of Scissor Sisters, makes this a Siren-inspired trip that's anything but doomed.
All Music Guide - John Bush
When New Order returned in 2001 with their first new record in eight years, the album they created Get Ready was given a great deal of leeway by fans if not critics. Was it original? Not very. Although the band never recycled a riff, many of the songs recalled not just the band's salad days, but often specific performances from '80s touchstones Brotherhood or Low-life. What saved Get Ready from irrelevance was a brace of great songs, a new look at the band as capable rockers, and what's more, that uncanny ability to produce timeless, ever-fresh recordings. Almost as surprising as that comeback record was its follow-up, Waiting for the Sirens' Call, which arrived in 2005. If New Order's ambition was only to reinforce themselves in their fans' imaginations as members of a working band à la their contemporaries Echo & the Bunnymen or even Duran Duran, for that matter, then the album is a success. Unfortunately, however, the adjectives that need to be attached to this record -- workmanlike, customary, unembarrassing -- aren't going to make music fans flood the record stores seeking copies. Bernard Sumner showed the effects of a writing drought, returning to old musical themes he'd visited and revisited before, and writing lyrics that make their 1993 single "Regret" a career classic in comparison. Titling a dramatic rocker "Dracula's Castle" may be perfectly acceptable, but then making explicit mention of that metaphor within a set of clumsy lyrics "You came in the night and took my heart/To Dracula's castle, in the dark" is taking the easy way out, to say the least. The first single, "Krafty," makes the band's ties to Kraftwerk obvious, but while the German motorische experts manufactured cleverly simplistic productions, they never reached the rudimentary levels of this single. And they surely knew better than making it sound like they meant it, as Sumner does, with the awful rhyme "But the world is a wonderful place/With mountains, lakes, and the human race." Even the mainstream dance tracks, "Jetstream" and "Guilt Is a Useless Emotion," evince a cold heartlessness that the band never strayed into during the '80s. If New Order continue making albums every several years instead of every decade, critics will quickly begin to strain for new ways to describe Peter Hook's plangent bass work or Sumner's half-bemused, half-baffled songwriting and vocal delivery. Still, that's nothing compared to what New Order might be reduced to recycling.
Rolling Stone - Rob Sheffield
Waiting for the Sirens' Call is their best since Technique, taking the "Blue Monday" beat into new wacked-out realms.

Waiting for the Sirens' Call is their best since Technique, taking the "Blue Monday" beat into new wacked-out realms.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/26/2005
  • Label: Warner Bros / Wea
  • UPC: 093624930723
  • Catalog Number: 49307

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Who's Joe? (5:43)
  2. 2 Hey Now What You Doing (5:13)
  3. 3 Waiting for the Sirens' Call (5:40)
  4. 4 Krafty (4:33)
  5. 5 I Told You So (5:58)
  6. 6 Morning Night and Day (5:08)
  7. 7 Dracula's Castle (5:38)
  8. 8 Jetstream - Ana Matronic (5:21)
  9. 9 Guilt Is a Useless Emotion (5:37)
  10. 10 Turn (4:33)
  11. 11 Working Overtime (3:27)
  12. 12 Guilt Is a Useless Emotion (6:29)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
New Order Primary Artist
Mac Quayle Keyboards
Stephen Morris Drums
Bernard Sumner Guitar, Vocals
Dawn Zee Vocals
Beatrice Hatherley Vocals
Phil Cunningham Guitar
Technical Credits
New Order Composer, Producer, Audio Production
John Leckie Producer, Audio Production
Mac Quayle Programming, Producer
Stephen Street Producer, Audio Production
Cenzo Townshend Engineer
Peter Saville Art Direction
Bruno Ellingham Engineer
Jim Spencer Producer, Audio Production
Stuart Price Producer, Audio Production
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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(1)

4 Star

(3)

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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    The best New Order by far - OUTSTANDING!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Pretty good...if you skip the bad songs...

    I am a HUGE new order fan. The GOOD: That PURE, Undenible, New Order sound - Bernard's voice, hook's bass, and that great treble guitar -- Are just ALWAYS going to sound awesome -- just listen to the middle portion of "Krafty" and it is like hearing "Ceremony" again for the first time. Much of the album becomes better with time and opens up to you. (Track "waiting for the sirens call" is the true stand-out for me). BUT: THE BAD --- Bernard's lyrics have alwasy been a little flat...but this album goes for pure CRINGE-factor on many lines. And "Jetstream", a horrible choice for a single - will not garner any new fans for sure. It is though still a decent album - They just have a sound you do not get sick of - ("Regret" will NEVER get "old" to me). This album just seems like a little more time for better lyrics, and a little more time to kick out the not-so-good songs and replace with better ones, would have paid off. According to an interview, they already almost have enough songs for a NEW album. I would have waited to put the best of those on "Sirens call".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Truly Disappointing

    After following New Order for many years, I am sorry to say that this is by far their worst album. There is nothing remotely redeemable about this release. "Who's Joe" sounds like mid-00's guitar pap, lead single "Krafty" sounds like a better-off-forgotten Technique b-side, and "Jetsream" is the sound of a fan's heart breaking(New Order never felt the need to collaborate with trendy, talentless hacks in the past, why now?). I would advise fans and casual listeners alike to pass this release over. To end on a happy note though, I have included some suggestions for recent artists that listeners may be interested in.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    follow the siren's call--straight to the rocks

    I've been a fan of New Order since they formed after Joy Division, back in 1981. For the last 15 years or so, they've threatened to break up after every album--perhaps they should have acted on that threat after the good, but uneven, 'Get Ready' album from a few years ago. This album just sounds tired, non-distinctive, repetitive, droning--they're just going through the motions. There's nothing New Order about any of this (there's very little that's even interesting) except Sumner's voice and Hook's bass--no energy, no drive. The best thing 'Waiting for the Siren's Call' has going for it is that it's not a double album. What's really amazing is that this album is so boring, punchless and repetitious yet Johnny Marr isn't on it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    easily the best this year

    Truly a masterpeice from New Order. A step above Get Ready. Very contagious from beginning to end. Every track is worth listening to. A long way from Joy Division

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    other reviewers are too quick to judge

    it is a very solid cd. i honestly like evry song on it. As for the other customer reviews, it seems like you didnt even give it a chance.

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