Walden and Civil Disobedience (Collins Classics)

Walden and Civil Disobedience (Collins Classics)

3.6 123
by Henry David Thoreau
     
 

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HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear;

Overview

HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practise resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience, and be able to give a true account of it in my next excursion. ”— Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780007502745
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/03/2013
Series:
Collins Classics
Sold by:
HarperCollins Publishers
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
569,818
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Henry David Thoreau (1817–62) was an American author, intellectual and political dissident most famous for his works Walden and Civil Disobedience. An active abolitionist and naturalist, Thoreau is best remembered for his theory of civil disobedience, which foregrounded the work of figures such as Mohandas Ghandi and Martin Luther King.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
July 12, 1817
Date of Death:
May 6, 1862
Place of Birth:
Concord, Massachusetts
Place of Death:
Concord, Massachusetts
Education:
Concord Academy, 1828-33); Harvard University, 1837

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Walden and Civil Disobedience 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 122 reviews.
TheNightTide More than 1 year ago
I read this novel shortly before entering college and i can honestly say that it was one of the greatest books i have ever had the pleasure of reading. Thoreau constantly forced me to see things as i had never seen them and challenged my definition of citizenry itself. However, this book is not an easy read, and it will take time and thought to fully understand and appreciate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read Walden many years ago and I called it my sure cure for insomnia. Now that I'm more mature, Walden's words resonate deep within me. Although this work was published 100 years before I was born, when I read it, I feel like Thoreau and I share the same soul. We have the same views, sensibilities, and foibles. At heart we are societal rebels and find incomparable delight and satisfaction in life's simple and natural treasures. Walden is a beautiful reminder that those of us who "march to the beat of a different drummer" are very much in tune with the rhythm of life.
Conrad_Jalowski More than 1 year ago
The American Transcendentalist Movement is often considered a reactionary intellectual movement to the traditions and principles of the Enlightenment; the dichotomy existing between the Period of Enlightenment and the Period of Romanticism. Transcendentalism is an extraordinarily complex intellectual movement that stressed the individual's purpose and role within civil society and the hierarchy of the world. Transcendentalism consisted of the constant renewal and introspection of the inward self, or the self-sufficient, self-autonomous and self-determined self that represents the individualistic entity. In addition, Transcendentalism calls for following one's own conscious and the avoidance of being enthralled to external events and factors that act to the detriment of the innate and inward self. Thoreauvian philosophy called for the noviolent resistance (subject and content specific) to policies promulgated by civil society that is despotic and tyrannical, or anything that acts contrary to the will of the individual and its autonomous spirit. Henry David Thoreau supported a limited role of government, and supported the rights of the minority. Whilst Hobbesian philosophy supported a strong, centralized government in the tradition of Thucydidean Realism, Henry David Thoreau was an individualist alongiside the similar philosophies and convictions of Soren Kierkegaard, Aristotle, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, John Locke, etc. On an additional factor, Henry David Thoreau was opposed to Jean-Jacques Rousseau's concept of the social contract as an agglomeration of the majority or the 'General Will' or of 'Popular Sovereignty' as it violated and displayed a total disregard and abhorrence for the rights of the minority. In essence, no Truth or higher ideal acts contrary to the conscious whether held in contrary regard by a single individual, a class of a few individuals or by the general populace as according to the Thoreauvian tradition. I highly recommend "Walden" and "Civil Disobediance" by Henry David Thoreau as such works reveal the innermost quarters of the human character; into the most precipitous and deepest of depths of the human spirit and mind. Henry David Thoreau infused his works with great passion, beauty, devotion and sensuality. He utilized vivid imagery and descriptive language; his works are voluptuous, harmonious and melodious.
ArielS More than 1 year ago
There has been no equal, nor will there be, to Henry David Thoreau. His writings and ideas truly magnify the human essence and bring out the worst and best aspects of being "human." His contemplations while at Walden pond are truly inspiring and edifying. How wonderful would life be if we could learn to give up the material and transitory things in this world. Walden and Civil Disobedience makes one wonder about one's interactions with other people and one's internal conflicts. A must have for deep thinkers and for those who seek to become more open-minded--set your minds free!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having attempted many times, and failed, to read Walden, I have finally and happily succeeded. In part my success was due to the platform. The Nook allowed me to look up the myriad words and allusions which with I was unfamiliar. This integrated access to a dictionary and internet resources allowed me to understand what I was reading in a deeper way than previously possible. Thoreau's classical and mythological allusions, as well as his use of scietific terminology and esoteric vocabulary rarely read or spoken today, are challenging, and rewarding. As to content, Thoreau made me think , made me laugh, engendered self-examination, enlarged my views on life. I was sorry to come to the end of the book. I look forward to reading it again. In the meantime, I will approach my days, my mornings and evenings, differently, because I finally finished Walden. sjbc
Guest More than 1 year ago
Thoreau is a poet at heart, and a philosophic genius in mind. Walden will keep readers hanging on every word. The true beauty of the Transcendentalist movement is highlighted in the best sense with Walden. The story is an autobiographical account of Thoreau's experiment to discover the true meaning of living deliberately. Walden is not a widely-known piece, but is a worthwhile read for anyone who has an appreciation for great literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although written in 1854, these two books are timeless and Civil Disobedience applies more and more as time goes on. People like Thoreau would be appalled at the state of government today. He would certainly be ashamed that we let the Government have the control that it does and that we did not take his advice long before this happened. I first read these two books when I was 13, some 45 years ago, and they are still at the top of my list of required reading. I'm not sure if that's good or bad... just read them if you haven't.
bjdoureaux 8 months ago
I wanted so badly to enjoy this book. I’ve read such wonderful things about the insights Thoreau has in it that I was expecting page after page of things that blew my mind, or at least made me nod vigorously in agreement. What I got was several pages of Thoreau explaining how he built his cabin. This explanation included listings of the materials and their cost. What I got was pages and pages of prose that amount to rambling on any given topic. I didn’t finish it. I ended up skimming a lot of the Economy section. I thought when I finally got to the Reading section that I would be glued, but I wasn’t. I quit after that. I’m not saying this book is completely without the promised insight. There were areas that I felt I was able to connect to and really read. Most of the time, however, it felt like sitting through a lecture on your least favorite subject with a professor who loves to hear himself talk. This edition from Barnes and Noble also has Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience.” I honestly didn’t bother to read that one. While Thoreau could definitely write well, this book was not engaging at all for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nicholas-Fernacz More than 1 year ago
Nicholas Fernacz Mr. Virzi AP Environmental Science December 30, 2014 Review of Walden & Civil Disobedience Walden is a very insightful, poetic piece of writing. Reading this work makes the reader feel very intelligent and a bit more refined. Although written in the 1800’s, by one of America’s most exceptional writers, the themes and commentary on the economy, and environment, and what it means to be human, is very applicable to today. Anyone, including economic and environmental science experts, can learn something from the work. Included in Walden is a window into the world of someone who lives, basically, completely to the bare bone. Imagine living in a house worth $28.13. Imagine that in the woods. Imagine hunting, and growing your crops. Thoreau proves that what a human being needs isn’t a lavish structure called a “home.” Humans don’t need to eat until they are fat, or wear the most expensive clothing. All you need to survive is written out exceptionally well, in Walden. Henry David Thoreau survived through the winter, the summer, and he did it with less than what a human being would need today. Our species has evolved mentally to the point where we can’t live on what we need; our dignity gets in the way. This book will shock you with how simple it is to live. Included in this copy of Walden is one of Thoreau’s most iconic essays: Civil Disobedience. Thoreau provides commentary on what it our responsibilities as American citizens are. Incredibly these commentaries, written way before today, are very applicable to today, similarly to Walden. Overall, after reading these two pieces, I feel very different about the way I live my life. I used to want to be extremely rich, but now I see that all of that really doesn’t matter. Thoreau changed my life for the better, and he can do the same for you.
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manirul01 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoy it
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