Walden: 150th Anniversary Illustrated Edition of the American Classic

( 227 )

Overview

Now featuring an Introduction by Don Henley, founder of the Walden Woods Project, this beautiful commemorative edition of Thoreau's masterpiece features spectacular color photographs that capture Walden as vividly as Thoreau's words do.
 

Henry David Thoreau was just a few days short of his twenty-eighth birthday when he built a cabin on the shore of Walden Pond and began one of the most famous experiments in living in American history. ...

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Overview

Now featuring an Introduction by Don Henley, founder of the Walden Woods Project, this beautiful commemorative edition of Thoreau's masterpiece features spectacular color photographs that capture Walden as vividly as Thoreau's words do.
 

Henry David Thoreau was just a few days short of his twenty-eighth birthday when he built a cabin on the shore of Walden Pond and began one of the most famous experiments in living in American history. Originally he was not, apparently, intending to write a book about his life at the pond, but nine years later, in August of 1854, Houghton Mifflin's predecessor, Ticknor and Fields, published Walden; or, a Life in the Woods. At the time the book was largely ignored, and it took five years to sell out the first printing of two thousand copies. It was not until 1862, the year of Thoreau's death, that the book was brought back into print, and it has never been out of print since. Published in hundreds of editions and translated into virtually every modern language, it has become one of the most widely read and influential books ever written. Proceeds from the sales of the book will be donated to the Walden Woods Project.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This 150th-anniversary edition features both color and monochrome illustrations. The book is priced at half a penny less than what Thoreau spent constructing his cabin, and a portion of the proceeds from sales are being donated to the Walden Woods Project, which strives to protect the land and waters the author loved. The Thoreau Institute and Houghton Mifflin will be holding celebratory events and displays, so be ready with a few copies of this beautiful edition. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 4/15/04.] Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-Henry David Thoreau's classic, first published in 1854 and reporting on his experiences at the eponymous site where he lived in physical and social independence during the mid-1840's, receives refreshing treatment here. William Hope reads leisurely but with feeling, offering listeners the illusion that the author is speaking directly to them. The abridgements are not substantive, so listeners will feel that they have become acquainted with the complexities of a text that is both orderly and sprinkled with irony and other literary devices. The chapters are tastefully set off by musical interludes that complement Thoreau's own rhythms. Not only is this an excellent alternative for students assigned to read the text that is often offered in tiny print without benefit of margins, but it is also possible to suggest this to thoughtful teens who are seeking an intellectually engaging listening experience for their personal enjoyment. Hope's pacing invites readers with minimal skills to accompany their print foray with his narration. The careful editing here assures that they will not become lost between page and sound.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618457175
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 8/11/2004
  • Edition description: None
  • Edition number: 150
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 199,092
  • Lexile: 1420L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Henry David Thoreau

SCOT MILLER is a professional photographer whose photographs have appeared in numerous books and publications, including Walden: The 150th Anniversary Illustrated Edition of the American Classic and Cape Cod: Illustrated Edition of the American Classic. Miller lives in Dallas, Texas, with his wife, Marilyn, where they operate Sun to Moon Gallery, a fine art photography gallery.
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    1. Also Known As:
      David Henry Thoreau (birth name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 12, 1817
    2. Place of Birth:
      Concord, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1862
    2. Place of Death:
      Concord, Massachusetts

Read an Excerpt

Introduction

Economy





When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a sojourner in civilized life again.



I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been made by my townsmen concerning my mode of life, which some would call impertinent, though they do not appear to me at all impertinent, but, considering the circumstances, very natural and pertinent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been curious to learn what portion of my income I devoted to charitable purposes; and some, who have large families, how many poor children I maintained. I will therefore ask those of my readers who feel no particular interest in me to pardon me if I undertake to answer some of these questions in this book. In most books, the I, or first person, is omitted; in this it will be retained; that, in respect to egotism, is the main difference. We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well. Unfortunately, I am confined to this theme by the narrowness of my experience. Moreover, I, on my side, require of every writer, first or last, a simple and sincere account of his own life, and not merely what he has heardof other men's lives; some such account as he would send to his kindred from a distant land; for if he has lived sincerely, it must have been in a distant land to me. Perhaps these pages are more particularly addressed to poor students. As for the rest of my readers, they will accept such portions as apply to them. I trust that none will stretch the seams in putting on the coat, for it may do good service to him whom it fits.



I would fain say something, not so much concerning the Chinese and Sandwich Islanders as you who read these pages, who are said to live in New England; something about your condition, especially your outward condition or circumstances in this world, in this town, what it is, whether it is necessary that it be as bad as it is, whether it cannot be improved as well as not. I have travelled a good deal in Concord; and everywhere, in shops, and offices, and fields, the inhabitants have appeared to me to be doing penance in a thousand remarkable ways. What I have heard of Bramins sitting exposed to four fires and looking in the face of the sun; or hanging suspended, with their heads downward, over flames; or looking at the heavens over their shoulders "until it becomes impossible for them to resume their natural position, while from the twist of the neck nothing but liquids can pass into the stomach"; or dwelling, chained for life, at the foot of a tree; or measuring with their bodies, like caterpillars, the breadth of vast empires; or standing on one leg on the tops of pillars–even these forms of conscious penance are hardly more incredible and astonishing than the scenes which I daily witness. The twelve labors of Hercules were trifling in comparison with those which my neighbors have undertaken; for they were only twelve, and had an end; but I could never see that these men slew or captured any monster or finished any labor. They have no friend Iolaus to burn with a hot iron the root of the hydra's head, but as soon as one head is crushed, two spring up.



I see young men, my townsmen, whose misfortune it is to have inherited farms, houses, barns, cattle, and farming tools; for these are more easily acquired than got rid of. Better if they had been born in the open pasture and suckled by a wolf, that they might have seen with clearer eyes what field they were called to labor in. Who made them serfs of the soil? Why should they eat their sixty acres, when man is condemned to eat only his peck of dirt? Why should they begin digging their graves as soon as they are born? They have got to live a man's life, pushing all these things before them, and get on as well as they can. How many a poor immortal soul have I met well-nigh crushed and smothered under its load, creeping down the road of life, pushing before it a barn seventy-five feet by forty, its Augean stables never cleansed, and one hundred acres of land, tillage, mowing, pasture, and woodlot! The portionless, who struggle with no such unnecessary inherited encumbrances, find it labor enough to subdue and cultivate a few cubic feet of flesh.



But men labor under a mistake. The better part of the man is soon plowed into the soil for compost. By a seeming fate, commonly called necessity, they are employed, as it says in an old book, laying up treasures which moth and rust will corrupt and thieves break through and steal. It is a fool's life, as they will find when they get to the end of it, if not before.

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Table of Contents

Foreword vi
Economy 1
Where I Lived, and What I Lived For 61
Reading 75
Sounds 85
Solitude 101
Visitors 110
The Bean-Field 123
The Village 133
The Ponds 139
Baker Farm 161
Higher Laws 168
Brute Neighbors 179
House-Warming 191
Former Inhabitants; and Winter Visitors 205
Winter Animals 217
The Pond in Winter 228
Spring 243
Conclusion 259
A Statement from the Walden Woods Project 271
Artist's Statement 273
List of Illustrations 275
Then & Now 276
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 227 )
Rating Distribution

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(74)

4 Star

(79)

3 Star

(34)

2 Star

(14)

1 Star

(26)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 226 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very poorly converted e-book

    This book is very poorly converted to e-book and contains too many errors to make it enjoyable to read; in some places it is impossible to read because you just can't tell what you are supposed to be reading.

    12 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2011

    Great Book, Terrible Reproduction

    "Walden" is one of the greatest and most important books in American literature, but this version is almost illegible on the Nook. Spend a couple more bucks and get another version.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 9, 2011

    Disappointed

    Walden is wonderful piece of literature. This copy contains a lot of unreadable text. Much of the text is ra dom characters and mumbo jumbo! Waste of money!

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Great Book, Poorly Digitalized

    This is a great book. However, this version presents as a lackluster scan-job with no editing yielding a finished product contaminated by numerous unintelligible conversion errors from smeared paragraphs to numerous misconverted words. I should note that I have not read this version in full as I was too dissatisfied with the poor quality to proceed much beyond the first forty pages (which I had previously read and was mostly scanning for errors in an attempt to find a legible nook version of this great book).

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Bad text

    There are several scan/ typing errors in this edition

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 10, 2011

    Couldnt read it

    Was not scanned well.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 24, 2011

    Image contains many, many formatting errors

    The first few pages are okay, but later ones contain whole paragraphs that are indecipherable jumbles of symbols, punctuation marks, and random letters. Walden is a good book, too bad this one is unreadable.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    The Best American Book EVER Written

    Of all the books and treatises that have ever been published since our country's founding, this one stands heads and shoulders above everything else. In this volume, Thoreau beautifully articulates all that is great about America ... not its guns and armies, but rather its trees and forests, the quite meditations possible in unspoilt nature, and the philosophy of self reliance.

    This is, as far as I am concerned, THE best American book EVER written, and is absolutely essential reading for anyone who wants to know about America.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Horrible version

    Thus free version is so loaded with jumbled text an errors, it is difficult to tead. Where is the quality control Barnes and Noble???

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    Walden

    Not my style.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2011

    didnt get to read

    I bought thid book and it took forever to download so i didnt get a chance to read it--too bad, maybe I will try again another time

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2014

    Missing a chapter!

    I don't know if was just my copy or everyones but the second chapter was missing! That chapter was needed for a book report i had to do, so j had to buy a second copy that had said chapter! So i would not buy this book if i was you!

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    I really enjoy it

    I really enjoy it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    Kirsten

    Yeah, where's Morgyn?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Meg

    (I read it. Sounds amazing) she went to the Athena treehouse. "I will see you next full moon milady." She bowed and went up the tree.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Kirsten

    She nodded and held up an arrow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Meg

    Looked at Artemis as she glowed. "I...never mind."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    Firefly

    Didn't Morgana leavr?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Renegade

    She howled, and a white and silver wisp traveled from her muzzle and joined the arrows.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Kress

    Her special cresent moon necklace glowed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 226 Customer Reviews

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