Waldo Chicken Wakes the Dead: A Murder Mystery of Unusual Proportions

Waldo Chicken Wakes the Dead: A Murder Mystery of Unusual Proportions

by Alan Goldsmith, David King, David King
     
 

Constable (Connie) O'Toole is a cartoonist with the not-so-unusual habit of talking to his cartoon characters, Waldo (a fat, pompous walrus) and the Chicken (a harried hen permanently roosting on Waldo's head) - but Waldo and the Chicken have a habit of talking back! Together they make the neighborhood's best detective team, until the skull of Becky Sawyer is found

Overview

Constable (Connie) O'Toole is a cartoonist with the not-so-unusual habit of talking to his cartoon characters, Waldo (a fat, pompous walrus) and the Chicken (a harried hen permanently roosting on Waldo's head) - but Waldo and the Chicken have a habit of talking back! Together they make the neighborhood's best detective team, until the skull of Becky Sawyer is found, then Connie and Waldo Chicken must use every skill they have to solve a mystery that might take them beyond the grave!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Constable (Connie) O'Toole is a cartoonist with the not-so-unusual habit of talking to his cartoon characters, Waldo (a fat, pompous walrus) and the Chicken (a harried hen permanently roosting on Waldo's head) — but Waldo and the Chicken have a habit of talking back! Together they make the neighborhood's best detective team, until the skull of Becky Sawyer is found, then Connie and Waldo Chicken must use every skill they have to solve a mystery that might take them beyond the grave!

Best Mystery Fiction 2004, The Library Journal

Library Journal
Cartoonist Connie O'Toole babbles incessantly with the "stars" of his weekly cartoon, an opinionated walrus with a chicken permanently nested on his head (weird). Nonetheless, a neighborhood child asks for their help in finding his lost cat. Connie and his long-suffering wife locate the feline in a nearby construction lot, along with a human skull, a ruby earring, and a Waldo Chicken statue, stolen the year before (weirder!). All kinds of colorful plot peregrinations ensue, accompanied by cartoony characters and witty dialog. Essential. Goldsmith lives in Atlanta. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781886249141
Publisher:
WindRiver Publishing
Publication date:
10/15/2004
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.69(d)
Age Range:
3 Months

Read an Excerpt

"I don't remember anything!" cackled the Chicken. "I can't

remember anything! It's all too gruesome!"

I could tell the Chicken was going to be of no help. Of course,

being in a coma would not have been a new experience for her.

She was always on the verge of falling into one at the slightest

provocation. But I was concerned about Waldo. He was actually

apologetic, a disposition totally foreign to him. I felt it could not

possibly be healthy for a fat, pompous, know-it-all walrus to be

suffering from such a condition.

"It's okay, Waldo," I said with great sympathy. "It's enough

that you remember being in the hole."

"Constable, you're not being condescending now, are you?"

asked Waldo, suddenly sounding a little more like himself. "That's

my turf, you know."

"No, no, I wasn't being condescending, Waldo. I was just…"

"Look, Constable, I'm going to try to explain a difficult concept

to you. It'll probably be beyond you, but I'll try to put it in

simpleton terms that maybe even you can understand."

I was greatly relieved. Normalcy had returned with a vengeance.

"Go ahead, Waldo. Explain a difficult concept to me," I said

gently.

"Now you're being sarcastic. But I'll ignore that for the time

being," began Waldo. "Now here's the concept. When you allowed

our statue to be kidnapped, what happened to the rest of

us?"

"What do you mean what happened to the rest of you?" I

asked.

"I knew this was going to be difficult," sighed Waldo. "What

I mean is—what happened to the part of us that stays in this

studio of yours. Did we just disappear along with the statue?"

"Uhh—no, of course not, you've never disappeared from this

studio. Although, you were pretty pissed off with me when I told

you the statue was missing."

"I nearly laid an egg!" recalled the Chicken.

"Ah, but that's just the point," said Waldo, ignoring the Chicken.

"We had to be told our statue was missing. We knew what had

happened at the séance but once you let go of us we weren't aware

of anything else that went on that night. We were comatose."

"Well, that's what I was trying to point out." I said. "While

you're in the statue you have to stay in physical contact with me

to—uhh—-well, how should I put it?" I stammered searching for

a tactful way of saying they owed their whole existence to me.

"You can put it where the sun don't shine," said Waldo helpfully,

"because, if you'll recall at the séance, Cluck Head and I

sometimes took our leave of that statue and went off on our own."

"That's right! You did! But, well, where does that get us?"

"I'd say it gets us to the Declaration of Independence."

What People are saying about this

Heather McCutcheon
The humor is over the top in a great way! I have no idea how Goldsmith could come up with so many snappy one liners and quirky jokes!
Canada

Meet the Author

Alan spent years laboring in the vineyards of Atlanta's advertising community, but never acquired a taste for the wine (much preferring Vodka, instead). He now lives with his wife, a gregarious West Highland Terrier named Percy, and a giant cat named William the Conqueror. There might be two more pestiferous pets, but who'd believe a walrus and a chicken?

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