A Walk in New York

Overview

New York City — the perfect place for a boy and his dad to spend the day! Follow them on their walk around Manhattan, from Grand Central Terminal to the top of the Empire State Building, from Greenwich Village to the Statue of Liberty, learning lots of facts and trivia along the way. In this unabashed ode to America’s biggest city, Salvatore Rubbino’s fresh, lively paintings and breezy text capture the delight of a young visitor experiencing the wonders of New York firsthand.

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Overview

New York City — the perfect place for a boy and his dad to spend the day! Follow them on their walk around Manhattan, from Grand Central Terminal to the top of the Empire State Building, from Greenwich Village to the Statue of Liberty, learning lots of facts and trivia along the way. In this unabashed ode to America’s biggest city, Salvatore Rubbino’s fresh, lively paintings and breezy text capture the delight of a young visitor experiencing the wonders of New York firsthand.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

It often takes a visitor to point out a city's treasures, and London artist Rubbino does just that in his debut, taking readers on a lively armchair tour of Manhattan sights as seen through the eyes of a day-tripping boy and his dad. First stop: bustling Grand Central Terminal, awash in sunlight that streams through the station's massive windows and onto "so many people-all in a hurry." The book's large trim size and the illustrator's perspective provide an entertaining and palpable sense of scale as the small boy marvels at skyscrapers and landmarks like the Flatiron Building and the main New York Public Library building. Design highlights include a vertical foldout of the Empire State Building; the subsequent spread offers a downtown view from its 86th-floor observatory. Each busy scene features exuberant narration from the boy ("This department store is called Macy's. Dad says that you can buy anything from a dishrag to a diamond inside"), as well as smaller captions of geographical or historical significance. Neophytes and jaded residents alike will embrace this vibrant and enticing slice of the Big Apple. Ages 4-up. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
A young boy and his dad have arrived in New York, and they are spending the day together taking in all of the major city sights. The arrive at Grand Central station, which we learn is the largest train station in the world, with more than 125,000 people passing through the terminal daily. The next wondrous sight includes the tall skyscrapers of Manhattan such as the famous Chrysler building and the Empire State building. The latter offers an opportunity to take an elevator up to the 86th floor to the observatory. There is a wonderful page that opens upward to show this tall building and provide additional details. Up at this height, our young boy and his dad can see the rivers, bridges, boroughs, and even the Statue of Liberty. The day continues with a yummy hot dog from a street vendor and a look at one of the oldest stores in New York—Macy's. Many other sights—parks, statues, the New York Public Library, Greenwich Village, and the piers along the Hudson River—entrance our duo, and then they take a taxi ride back to Grand Central Station where this trip all started. New York is a fabulous town, and this picture book will give kids a taste of what awaits them on their own visits. It is also a great choice for Father's Day because father and son are certainly enjoying this outing together. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal

Gr 2-5

With a backpack over his shoulders, a T-shirted youngster and his father delight in a day in Manhattan in this entertaining and informative travelogue. The boy's first-person narration, set in casual, inviting type, is breezy and involving, making readers feel part of the adventure. In smaller type, fascinating tidbits, staggered around the page to catch attention, supply information such as the number of train platforms at Grand Central Station (44), the names of the New York Public Library's marble lions (Patience and Fortitude), and how many taxicabs (more than 12,000) ply the city streets. Illustrated endpapers, including the Flatiron Building, Greenwich Village, and Macy's, map the journey. Rubbino uses the whole page to tell his story, letting subdued colors provide effective backdrops to the tall buildings and high bridges; then, when the two reach the Empire State Building, the page unfolds upward, showing the landmark structure in its full glory. Meanwhile, the artist doesn't stint on views of New Yorkers; sketches of people-all sizes, shapes, colors, and from all walks of life-provide great opportunities for people-watching on the page. At day's end, a cab ride back to Grand Central makes a fitting ending to the pair's highly satisfying day. This is an intriguing snapshot of the Big Apple, sure to delight New York City residents, tourists, and would-be visitors.-Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA

Kirkus Reviews
This is not, of course, about New York City as a whole, but about Manhattan, as nearly all such volumes aimed at young people are. A boy and his dad come into Grand Central on the commuter train. In the boy's voice, readers hear of their travels to the Empire State Building (on a rather spiffy foldout), the New York Public Library, Macy's, Union Square and Greenwich Village. Various factlets are scattered throughout, separate from the boy's narrative, and while none seem to be incorrect, no sources are given anywhere. The Lenape name for the Hudson River, Muhheakantuck, is described merely as an "American Indian name," and the Wickquasgeck Trail (Broadway) is similarly described, which undercuts the specificity of a spread in which passersby exchange greetings in seven of New York's 170 languages. The 1950s-look mixed-media art is done in earth tones with hints of sunniness. It's very pretty, but doesn't replace other such standbys as Kathy Jakobsen's My New York (1993, 2003). (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763638559
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 4/14/2009
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 212,395
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 11.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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