Walk in the Rain with a Brain

( 1 )

Overview

Each brain finds its own special way — that's the message in this delightful, colorful story by America's foremost expert on learning and childhood development.

Edward Hallowell, M.D., is a noted psychiatrist and teacher and a leading authority on attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. At many of his lectures worldwide he has read a story he wrote for children about how each person's brain is unique — and it has resonated among the thousands...

See more details below
Hardcover
$13.40
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (22) from $5.94   
  • New (13) from $9.32   
  • Used (9) from $5.94   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Each brain finds its own special way — that's the message in this delightful, colorful story by America's foremost expert on learning and childhood development.

Edward Hallowell, M.D., is a noted psychiatrist and teacher and a leading authority on attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. At many of his lectures worldwide he has read a story he wrote for children about how each person's brain is unique — and it has resonated among the thousands of parents, teachers, and others who have heard it.

A Walk in the Rain with a Brain is the illustrated version of that story. In it, a little girl named Lucy is making her way down a rainy sidewalk when she spies, of all things, a brain — Manfred, called Fred — sitting forlornly in a puddle. The courtly cerebrum asks Lucy for help getting home, and as they walk along she worries that she's not smart enough. "Everyone's smart!" explains Fred. "You just need to find out at what!" Fred reassures her that each child learns and thinks differently — and that every child has special talents.

Charming illustrations and a funny, whimsical story teach children to play and learn in order to find the strengths they have — and a discussion guide at the end gives parents and educators the background support they need in order to help children understand and discover the sparkling individuality of their minds.

Lucy meets a brain that helps her realize that everyone is smart in different ways. Includes a discussion section for parents and teachers.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Psychiatrist Hallowell (Driven to Distraction) attempts to impart a worthwhile if well-worn message in rhyming couplets. Unfortunately the story's hokey and jarring delivery significantly diminishes the impact of the moral, as does the garish artwork. Walking in the rain, Lucy encounters a bug-eyed creature who "look[s] like a lump of cold smoke" and says, "Hello, little girl, I'm a brain,/ And I'm stuck out here in the rain./ Manfred's my name, for short it's just Fred,/ And I fear that I've just lost my head." As the two go in search of Fred's missing body part, the child asks the brain to make her smart and "Fred said with a start,/ `Everyone's smart!/ You just need to find out at what!' " He then launches into a rambling tale about a brain named Complain who coined the word "smart," equating "smart" with "best." Finally a brain called Tru counters Complain's claim, announcing, "No brain is the best!/ .../ What we need to do is explore and find all our talents galore!" Just before an eerie scene in which Fred "dive[s] into his head" to end the tale, he echoes this sentiment in equally vapid terms: "No brain is the same, no brain is the best,/ Each brain finds its own special way." Mayer's depiction of the brain characters does not differentiate among them, and the girl's nearly featureless face may creep out some youngsters. His sterile compositions do little to enliven the narrative. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
What is an adventure that can last a lifetime? Another way of asking this question is "what does your brain really like to do?" A long time ago everyone was smart and knew how to play: play at words, play at dancing, play at chess. There was no such thing as stupid. But along came the "test" and now we measure smartness, and who is the "best," and life is no longer an adventure. Now we have smart kids and dumb kids, "if you think like me, then smart you'll be." The message Dr. Hallowell tells parents, teachers, and coaches is that "no brain is best." What each brain needs is to explore and find out what talents it has and to make a long list of those things you like to do and play. Bill Mayer's distinctive graphic illustrations, delight us as Fred the purple brain with bright yellow ping-pong eyes accompanies little Lucy as they search for a head to put Fred's brain in and regain Lucy's self-esteem. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 5 up.
—Sue Stefurak
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060007317
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/2004
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 176,454
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward M. Hallowell, M.D., is a child and adult psychiatrist, the director of the Hallowell Center for Cognitive and Emotional Health in Concord, Massachusetts, and a senior lecturer at Harvard Medical School. He is the coauthor of the national bestseller on attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Driven to Distraction, and the author of a number of other important works, including The Childhood Roots of Adult Happiness, Connect, Answers to Distraction, and When You Worry About the Child You Love, which was named best book of the year on child development by Child magazine. A graduate of Harvard and Tulane University School of Medicine, he lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, with his wife and three children.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2004

    An One of a Kind Tribute to Our Children's Uniqueness. Also speaks to the 'systems' that undermind who they are...

    Unprecedented in its efforts to help children, parents and educators, see how the 'system' or traditional thinking can undermine the well-being of all different kinds of minds.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)