The Walking Man

The Walking Man

4.0 1
by Jiro Taniguchi
     
 

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Whoever takes the time these days to climb a tree in bare feet? To stop and observe the comings and goings of the birds? To play in the puddles after the rain has gone? To return a shell to the sea? [i]The Walking Man[/i] follows a modern day Japanese business man as he strolls at random through urban Japan - often silent, usually alone - with his vivid dreams that

Overview

Whoever takes the time these days to climb a tree in bare feet? To stop and observe the comings and goings of the birds? To play in the puddles after the rain has gone? To return a shell to the sea? [i]The Walking Man[/i] follows a modern day Japanese business man as he strolls at random through urban Japan - often silent, usually alone - with his vivid dreams that let time stand still. Every corporate American should have a copy on their desk and, in times of stress, take two chapters, twice a day. Take a little stress out of your life and relax with [i]The Walking Man[/i], a little step every day. Lovingly reversed in collaboration with the creator to read left to right.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788493340995
Publisher:
Ponent Mon S.L.
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Jiro Taniguchi was born 1947 in Tottori, Japan. He trained in the 60's and debuted in 1971 in 'Young Comic'. During the 70's he worked with author Natsuo Sekikawa before launching into their massive work 'The times of Botchan' in the 80's. The 90's saw many solo works including the prize winning 'A Distant Neighborhood'. The new millenium saw Taniguchi's epic adaptation of Baku Yumemakura's novel 'The Summit of the Gods' into a 1500 page manga. He continues to live and work in Japan.

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The Walking Man 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MarcLumberjack More than 1 year ago
The Walking Man is an intriguing collection of stories, since none have a strong plot--if any to speak of. It follows the moments of a man who takes walks, which I'm sure you gathered from the title. So, if you're looking for a series with an engaging plot with lots of action, I thoroughly suggest looking elsewhere because you won't find it here. This isn't a bad thing, however. The stories are enjoyable and really do put you in the environment the walking man lives in. He exists more as a window for the reader, but a window with its own distinct charm. Though dialogue isn't common, what we do hear from the walking man does provide personality. Even stronger character development comes from his actions themselves. The main character does do some surprising things, but they don't necessarily shock you; he's a rounded enough character that they seem natural for him. The art is also wonderful, and I loved the detail of the walking man's glasses whenever they were shown. Taniguchi put a lot of care into these aspects, and intentionally so, I believe. I only wish there were some color pages, since the watercolor featured on the cover looks great and would help put me into the moment even more. The book itself is of good quality, as well. There is no dustcover, but for me this is a plus, since those things always get lost or bent. The pages are creamy and of good quality, allowing for a crisp print that won't smudge. I can't speak too much to the translation, since there isn't a lot of dialogue in the first place. The Walking Man probably won't excite you or ask some hard-hitting questions, but it is intriguing, nonetheless. Like I said, there aren't any strong plots, so it comes across more as a book of graphic poetry, rather than a graphic novel. If you're looking for something different, or something that's just pleasing in a gentle way, you should consider The Walking Man. I have also included A Single Match by Oji Suzuki in my recommendations. This is because it's similar in its "plotless" aspect to The Walking Man, but please bear in mind that the stories in A Single Match deal with darker themes and have a gloomier atmosphere, and also are more directly graphically poetic than The Walking Man.