Walking Stars

Walking Stars

4.0 2
by Victor Villasenor
     
 

"We're all walking stars," the eighty-four year old guide tells Victor Villasenor as he travels to his mother's birthplace, La Lluvia de Oro. "Don't you know what we all are? We are all stars that come from the heavens." Villasenor, Who is in pursuit of legendary family stories for his family history, Rain of Gold, opens his eyes to the world the guide shows him, and…  See more details below

Overview

"We're all walking stars," the eighty-four year old guide tells Victor Villasenor as he travels to his mother's birthplace, La Lluvia de Oro. "Don't you know what we all are? We are all stars that come from the heavens." Villasenor, Who is in pursuit of legendary family stories for his family history, Rain of Gold, opens his eyes to the world the guide shows him, and in this collection, Villasenor shares that enchanted world with the reader. In these short stories for young people, magic rains down from the heavens like stars, coating each of the family stories in a sheen of la vida as it should be: filled with power and surprises that give each character the strength to endure. Along with the author's own discovery in Lluvia de Oro, the stories brim with a cast of extraordinary characters in challenging situations: the young girl on her first day of school who shows bravery even in the face of schoolyard taunts ... a young man about to be hanged that can only be saved by the miracle of song ... and the young boy who faces El Diablo in a dark peach orchard. Through it all, the characters truly show themselves to be walking stars, tiny luminous sparks of light, and they are able to affect change in their lives and the world around them by relying on their bravery, their strength, and their faith in themselves. These are the stories of ancestors long-past, stories that will scrape off the dust of modernity on the reader's skin to show the glowing beings that Villasenor and his family believe we once were and can still be.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
The author, a novelist and lecturer, recounts family legends with which he grew from childhood to maturity within a Mexican immigrant family. Some of these stories are brief, based on his own memory of events, while others are longer and/or find their basis in stories handed down to him by one or the other of his parents. Topics addressed include how his dog foretold the death of his brother; his mother's childhood witnessing of a neighbor giving birth; his father meeting up with La Bruja (the iconographic witch of Latin American storytelling); and the family connection to Pancho Villa's revolutionary army. Villasenor's narrative style is colloquial and engaging, giving the reader the sense of hearing these tales firsthand. His characterizations of girls, indigenous peoples, and soldiers are remarkably even-handed and sensitive. In addition to offering insights on border life during the span of the 20th century, the tales offer models for young writers who want to shape family stories of their own into written prose. This book also serves as an introduction to a Chicano author whose body of work includes novels (Macho!) and nonfiction (Jury: The People vs. Juan Corona). KLIATT Codes: JS-Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 1994, Arte Publico Press, Univ. of Houston, 202p., Ages 12 to 18.
— Francisca Goldsmith

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558853942
Publisher:
Arte Publico Press
Publication date:
06/20/2003
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
343,450
Product dimensions:
5.56(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.61(d)
Lexile:
980L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 18 Years

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Walking Stars 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Walking Stars written by Victor Villasenor is a book based on the power of belief and love of your family. In the book are vivid memories of a child hood, and stories of birth and death. Taking place in san diego, Juan and his family go through a rollercoaster of events. Lupe, a young girl, was let in to woman hood when she helped deliver Socorro's baby. 'good mi hijita, keep going, your doing great' Lupe froze, staring in disbeleif as she watched and heard and felt the power of this miracle. Her eyes filled with tears. This is when Lupe sees the baby being born and is christened into womanhood. I myself did not really enjoy this book because it was something different from what i normally read and was a little emotional for my liking, but it was still a decent book and would definately be a good book for people who like sad books.