Walking the Perfect Square (Moe Prager Series #1) by Reed Farrel Coleman | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Walking the Perfect Square (Moe Prager Series #1)

Walking the Perfect Square (Moe Prager Series #1)

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by Reed Farrel Coleman
     
 

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“The story and the characters will hook you, and Coleman’s lightly warped take on the world will make you laugh, dark as the tale is.”—Marilyn Dahl, Shelf Awareness

“Whenever our customers are looking for a new series to read, they often leave with a copy of Walking the Perfect Square. It has easily been our best-selling

Overview

“The story and the characters will hook you, and Coleman’s lightly warped take on the world will make you laugh, dark as the tale is.”—Marilyn Dahl, Shelf Awareness

“Whenever our customers are looking for a new series to read, they often leave with a copy of Walking the Perfect Square. It has easily been our best-selling backlist title. Thank you, Busted Flush, for bringing this classic ‘Moe’ back into print!”—Gary Shulze, Once Upon a Crime Mystery Bookstore (Minneapolis, Minnesota)

“Moe is a fine sleuth. Coleman is an excellent writer.”—Publishers Weekly

Introducing Brooklyn private eye Moe Prager in his first acclaimed crime novel.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Among the undying conventions of detective fiction is the one that requires every retired cop to have a case that still haunts him. Reed Farrel Coleman blows the dust off that cliche in Walking the Perfect Square with a mystery that would get under anyone's skin." — Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review

"Reed Farrel Coleman is a terrific writer... a hard-boiled poet... If life were fair, Coleman would be as celebrated as [George] Pelecanos and [Michael] Connelly." — Maureen Corrigan, NPR’s Fresh Air

"Reed Farrel Coleman is one of the more original voices to emerge from the crime fiction field in the last ten years. For the uninitiated, Walking the Perfect Square is the place to start." — George Pelecanos, best-selling author of The Way Home

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Raymond Chandler once advised that when things get slow in a story, have a man with a gun come through the door. What's most remarkable about Coleman's first mystery to feature Brooklyn PI Moe Praeger (after three Dylan Klein noirs: Little Easter, etc.) is that he never resorts to such a crude device. Rooted in the late 1970s, the story is so solid, the characters so compelling, the pace so expertly driven that he can dispense with the usual genre stitches. If the one murder in the book occurs off-stage, there's no lack of suspense. The author makes us care about his characters and what happens to them, conveying a real sense of human absurdity and tragedy, of the price people will pay to get ahead or hide their true selves. Moe's job he's an ex-cop forced to retire because of a knee injury is to find the son of another cop, a young man who left a party one night and hasn't been seen since. So many people have been searching for Patrick Mahoney in the 20 years since his disappearance that Moe doesn't expect to be successful. As his investigation proceeds, he finds himself looking for two Patricks: one a choir boy lookalike and the other described by those who knew him as "weird" and "strange." But why? Is it possible Patrick's father really doesn't want to find his son? Patrick stands at the core of the novel, and the intricate tale of what happened to him makes for a first-rate mystery. Moe is a fine sleuth. Coleman is an excellent writer. (Dec.) Forecast: The misleading title and inappropriate jacket art won't help, but praise from a few big name authors could give a real boost to this series down the line. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Neck-deep in a sea of troubles, p.i. Moe Prager gets a phone call-unexpected and at first unwanted-that could bail him out or shove him under. It's from a nursing nun, informing Moe of the imminent death of a man he's never heard of. But in his possession Tyrone Bryson has a certain magazine clipping that sends Moe hurtling back into a case 20 years old. When college student Patrick Maloney suddenly vanished in the summer of 1977, Moe had just torn up a knee and been pensioned off by the NYPD. Unemployed and hating it, he'd accepted the proposition of Frank Maloney, Patrick's politically connected father: Find my son, and it'll be worth your while in dollars and favors. Moe signed on, of course, but it was a decision with fateful consequences. On the bright side, it brought him Katy, the beautiful Maloney daughter who eventually became his wife. On the dark and dismal side, it sucked him into a vortex of secrets and lies, betrayals and corruption, involving some people he'd once thought of as incorruptible. Hurrying to the hospital back in the present tense, he's convinced that Tyrone Bryson can unlock the mystery of Patrick Maloney's disappearance-if only Moe can outrace death. Much ado about the missing Maloney, a character too shadowy to warrant the attention. Coleman (They Don't Play Stickball in Milwaukee, 1997, etc.) has done better work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979270956
Publisher:
Busted Flush Press, LLC
Publication date:
06/01/2008
Series:
Moe Prager Series, #1
Pages:
230
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Reed Farrel Coleman was Brooklyn born and raised. He is the former Executive Vice President of Mystery Writers of America.  His third Moe Prager novel, The James Deans, won the Shamus, Barry and Anthony Awards for Best Paperback Original.  The book was further nominated for the Edgar, Macavity, and Gumshoe Awards. Megan Abbott is the Edgar Award-winning author of Die a Little, The Song Is You, and Queenpin. She also edited Busted Flush Press' female noir anthology, A Hell of a Woman. Her Damn Near Dead (Busted Flush Press) short story, "Policy," was the basis for her Edgar-winning novel, Queenpin. She has a Ph.D. in English and American literature.

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Walking the Perfect Square (Moe Prager Series #1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
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cbjones More than 1 year ago
Mr. Coleman pulls off the difficult task of breathing new life into a stale genre. His characters are sympathetic because he makes them real. Moe Prager is the hard-drinker, cynical loner we expect from a detective novel. He's more of an everyman who cares deeply for his family and friends and doesn't want to see them hurt. You will care for them (and Moe) too.