Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel [NOOK Book]

Overview

A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war.

Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army. ...
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Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel

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Overview

A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war.

Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army.  But first Morgan must elude a group of murderous escaped convicts in pursuit of a mysterious stone that has fallen into his possession.

It’s 1864, and the country is in the grip of the bloodiest war in American history.  Meanwhile, the Kinneson family has been quietly conducting passengers on the Underground Railroad from Vermont to the Canadian border.  One snowy afternoon Morgan leaves an elderly fugitive named Jesse Moses in a mountainside cabin for a few hours so that he can track a moose to feed his family.  In his absence, Jesse is murdered, and thus begins Morgan’s unforgettable trek south through an apocalyptic landscape of war and mayhem.

Along the way, Morgan encounters a fantastical array of characters, including a weeping elephant, a pacifist gunsmith, a woman who lives in a tree, a blind cobbler, and a beautiful and intriguing slave girl named Slidell who is the key to unlocking the mystery of the secret stone.  At the same time, he wrestles with the choices that will ultimately define him – how to reconcile the laws of nature with religious faith, how to temper justice with mercy.  Magical and wonderfully strange, Walking to Gatlinburg is both a thriller of the highest order and a heartbreaking odyssey into the heart of American darkness.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A Civil War odyssey in the tradition of Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain and Robert Olmstead’s Coal Black Horse, Mosher’s latest (after On Kingdom Mountain), about a Vermont teenager’s harrowing journey south to find his missing-in-action brother, is old-fashioned in the best sense of the word. Seventeen-year-old Morgan Kinneson goes in search of his older brother, Pilgrim, a Union soldier reported MIA at Gettysburg. But first, Morgan accidentally causes the death of a runaway slave he was leading to safety in Canada. In the course of tracking down his missing brother, Morgan is pursued by slave catchers, accompanies an elephant on an Erie Canal showboat, visits the battlefield at Gettysburg, meets an escaped slave who turns out to be the dead slave’s granddaughter, and gets wounded during a mountain feud before learning of Pilgrim’s fate. Complicating matters is a rune stone the dead slave left to Morgan, which could compromise the security of the Underground Railroad if the slave catchers get their hands on it. The story of Morgan’s rite-of-passage through an American arcadia despoiled by war and slavery is an engrossing tale with mass appeal. (Mar.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307450944
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/2/2010
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 322,073
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

HOWARD FRANK MOSHER is the author of ten books.  His novel A Stranger in the Kingdom won the New England Book Award for Fiction and was made into a movie, as were his novels Disappearance and Where the Rivers Flow North.  A recipient of the Literature Award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, Mosher lives in Vermont.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I loved it

    For me this was a I can't wait to get back to reading it book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2010

    Worst book I've read in years

    I read more than one book per week and this one has to have been the worst I've read in years. It was a mixture of Deerslayer and Alice in Wonderland. Totally absurd and unbelievable with bizarre and unlikely plot twists. I certainly do not recommend it to any serious reader.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2010

    Excellent Book but Wondering ...

    This is the best American adventure books I've read since The Travels of Jaime McPheeters. But I have one question. What in the novel in historical fact, and what is very good and very entertaining fiction? As I've read I've tried looking up various people, places, and facts, and keep coming up blank. The novel is wonderful, but I wish there was a bibliography, a suggested additional reading list, or even a brief explanation of what is real, and what is not.

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  • Posted January 10, 2010

    Walking to Gatlinburg

    I have been impatiently waiting to read this book since I first heard about it in mid-2007. Mosher's writing is filled with the inspiration and ironies of life in rural, mountain communities of the northeastern United States. I highly recommend his novels from past years as background for his upcoming one. They are recalled in the same way as folk tales from our youth, with an emphasis on the power of community, place and imagination. If you have ever enjoyed sitting on the porch with your father during a thunderstorm while he relayed the tales of Washington Irving, then I believe you will also relish the tales of Howard Frank Mosher.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2010

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    Posted March 24, 2010

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    Posted March 9, 2010

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    Posted February 6, 2010

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    Posted November 8, 2010

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    Posted April 10, 2011

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

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