Walking with Bilbo

( 13 )

Overview

2005 Logos Bookstores Award winner for Best Youth Book

The author of Walking with Frodo takes readers on an adventure of faith with this devotional that relates themes from J. R. R. Tolkien's The Hobbit to living the Christian life. Unlike the fateful quest Frodo was asked to carry out, Bilbo's journey came as an unexpected adventure. Readers will be reminded that God chooses us to be unlikely heroes in the adventure of life. Tyndale House ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $5.85   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Walking with Bilbo

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - 1)
$8.49
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$9.99 List Price

Overview

2005 Logos Bookstores Award winner for Best Youth Book

The author of Walking with Frodo takes readers on an adventure of faith with this devotional that relates themes from J. R. R. Tolkien's The Hobbit to living the Christian life. Unlike the fateful quest Frodo was asked to carry out, Bilbo's journey came as an unexpected adventure. Readers will be reminded that God chooses us to be unlikely heroes in the adventure of life. Tyndale House Publishers

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781414301310
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/28/2005
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 758,990
  • Age range: 15 years
  • Product dimensions: 4.98 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Walking With Bilbo

A Devotional Adventure Through J. R. R. Tolkien's The Hobbit
By Sarah Arthur

Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2005 Sarah Arthur
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4143-0131-0

Contents

A Note from the Author.........................................vii Read This First................................................xiii How to Use This Book...........................................xix 1 Looking for a Few Good Men (or Hobbits)......................1 2 Job Description, Please......................................9 3 Sheer Madness................................................19 4 Traveling Light..............................................27 5 Now You See Him, Now You Don't...............................35 6 Plans Go Astray..............................................43 7 Going On.....................................................51 8 Seeking and Finding..........................................59 9 For Pity's Sake..............................................67 10 Portents of Great Significance..............................75 11 Between a Rock and a Hard Place.............................83 12 Help Un-looked For..........................................91 13 Choose Your Own Adventure...................................99 14 Stick to the Path!..........................................107 15 The Unlikely Hero...........................................117 16 GoodLuck?..................................................125 17 Decent Companions...........................................133 18 Living Legends..............................................143 19 True Identity...............................................151 20 Where Your Treasure Is......................................161 21 Adventure's End.............................................171 22 Home at Last................................................179 Quick Reference Guide: A Glossary of Terms.....................186 Notes..........................................................192

Chapter One

Looking for a Few Good Men (or Hobbits)

"I am looking for someone to share in an adventure that I am arranging, and it's very difficult to find anyone." Gandalf, Chapter One of The Hobbit

Remember those awful middle school gym classes when the teacher selected two captains and told them to take turns picking their teammates, one at a time? Either the captains' voices were drowned by the clamoring throng ("Pick me! Pick me!"), or their words echoed in an uncomfortable silence ("I want her but not him; and you, over there-No, not you."). Any twinge of sympathy for those left standing till the end was quickly overpowered by the extreme relief at not being one of them. How unfair it seems that certain people should be chosen (for some of the silliest reasons, too) while others aren't!

Then of course, there's the wretched classroom lecture scenario, usually involving a subject in which you feel hopelessly stupid. While the instructor paces around the podium, you sit quietly in your seat, trying not to move or sneeze or in any way draw attention to yourself. Because you know the firing squad of questions is coming. The instructor will wheel around suddenly and aim a zinger at some poor, unsuspecting student who may or may not have the fortitude to answer. And you hope it won't be you. (Please don't pick me. PLEASE.) How unfair it seems that every student will be chosen at some point, including you!

Hmm. Interesting to compare the two scenarios, isn't it? In the first, you're desperate to get the attention of the person in charge rather than suffer the embarrassment of not being selected. In the second, you're desperate to stay under the radar altogether. But in both situations, you'll end up getting chosen eventually. The issue isn't whether or not you'll be chosen; the issue is when.

For Mr. Bilbo Baggins-who is about to be selected by one of the most famous captains in all literature-the time is now. Gandalf is in something of a hurry, and the little hobbit doesn't appear to be doing anything important at the moment. If he'd had his wits about him, Bilbo would've disappeared inside his hobbit-hole the minute he saw Gandalf coming. (Please don't pick me. PLEASE.) But besides being completely unaware of Gandalf 's intentions, Bilbo is also-deep down-an adventurous fellow, though he doesn't realize it yet.

In fact, there are a great many things he doesn't realize, as Gandalf well knows. The wizard tells the dwarves, "There is a lot more in him than you guess, and a deal more than he has any idea of himself." Bilbo is being chosen precisely because Gandalf sees something in him that needs only the "chance to come out," and an adventure will do the job nicely. Despite Bilbo's protests-as well as those of the dwarves-he becomes the "chosen and selected burglar" for the expedition to the Lonely Mountain.

Chosen and selected. The words have a nice ring, don't they? They make us sit up a bit taller, lift our chins a little. Even if, like Bilbo, we're not sure what the words mean exactly, we rather like the idea of being handpicked for a purpose. It's not simply because we're susceptible to flattery, like the dragon, Smaug. Deep down we long to know that we have value and worth in someone's eyes, that someone thinks we have a role to play in the stories of our time.

And Someone does. The Creator of the universe is also the Creator of every human life, including yours, and all that he does has a purpose. God made you for a reason and has a plan for your life. He's calling you to fulfill a purpose within a story that is larger than you could ever dream or imagine: an adventure beyond all adventures!

God had been in the business of hand-selecting people for specific jobs since the beginning of time. He cranked the recruitment process into high gear when Jesus came on the scene. Picture Peter with his brother Andrew, mending fishing nets on the shores of an inland sea. Peter doesn't have much in the way of education, nor is he what you might consider ... um, shall we say, prudent. But Jesus says, "Come, be my disciples" (Matthew 4:19), and off he goes, Andrew at his side. Drop everything? Now? Okay. The rest of the twelve disciples have similar responses, and before long, voilà: you have an organized expedition.

Frankly, if you're really not interested in adventures, it's wise to hide when you see Jesus coming. He has Gandalf-like tendencies that are really quite alarming. "Follow me," he says. "Take nothing for your journey. Go the extra mile. Why do you worry about what you will eat or what you will wear? Seek first God's kingdom." These are not safe words. At the very least, they could "make you late for dinner." In fact, they might mean you don't get any dinner at all.

But Jesus also says to his disciples, "You didn't choose me. I chose you" (John 15:16). This adventure of faith may appear to have a rather dubious origin and an even more dubious outcome, but that doesn't trump the fact that in this moment, in this hour, you are being called to walk with Jesus.

The question is, will you go?

Long ago, even before he made the world, God loved us and chose us in Christ. Ephesians 1:4

GOING FURTHER

* What tasks have you been "chosen and selected" for? Why were you chosen?

* How does it feel to be asked?

* How does God view you? How easy or difficult is it to see yourself the way God sees you?

* Why has God chosen and selected you for the adventure of faith?

* What are you going to do about it?

THE WORD ON BEING CHOSEN

Take some time to read one or more of the following Bible passages:

Deuteronomy 7:6-8; Isaiah 6:8 and 41:9-10; Mark 2:13-17; Luke 6:12-16; James 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Walking With Bilbo by Sarah Arthur Copyright © 2005 by Sarah Arthur. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 5, 2012

    Tolkein¿s stories are so powerful.  It¿s no wonder that Sarah Ar

    Tolkein’s stories are so powerful.  It’s no wonder that Sarah Arthur was able to write an entire book about Bilbo and how his adventure
    relates to our Christian walk.  (She also wrote a devotional called Walking With Frodo that I’ll have to read!)  I could tell that her focus
    audience is “youth”– junior high, high school, and college, as she often uses examples that would be a part of their lives (taking a test,
    having a roommate, etc.)   I’m going to give the book to my son to read next, but I got a lot out of it as a 40-year-old!  It was fun to read
    about some things in the stories of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings and about Tolkein himself that I never knew before.

    Here is how Walking With Bilbo is arranged:  There are 22 chapters; it would be good to read one chapter a day.  Each begins with a
    quote from The Hobbit.  Then the chapter discusses that scene from the book and moves into how we can learn from it in our Christian
    walk as Jesus’ disciples.  Sometimes she’ll compare some of the characters of The Hobbit to people in the Bible.  The chapter ends
    with a Scripture verse, questions to answer called “Going Further,” and several Scripture passages to look up in the Bible.  One thing
    that’s neat about the way she arranged the devotional is that it goes in order of the story of The Hobbit, so if you want to read both books
    at the same time, it works out great.  The book also ends with a Quick Reference Guide Glossary of Terms to The Hobbit and The Lord of
    the Rings, as well as footnotes.

    Here are a couple of my favorite quotes from Walking With Bilbo.
    “So if you’re feeling a little unqualified lately, if you’re slightly queasy about the details of God’s classified ad, take heart.  Like Bilbo, you’ve
     been called for a reason.  The job of following Jesus isn’t for the faint of heart; but God never would call you if he didn’t plan to strengthen
     your heart along the way.”
    “It’s not that he [Bilbo] has become something other than his true character; it’s that he has become the hobbit he was always meant to
    be. . . .When we surrender our very selves to Christ and embark on the adventure of faith, we become more the unique person we were
    always created to be, not less.”

    I have a feeling that Sarah Arthur is as excited as I am of the movie coming out next week, perhaps more so because she has immersed
    herself in Tolkein’s books at a far deeper level than I have.  If you are a Middle-Earth lover, and a believer in Jesus Christ (as Tolkein was)
     then Walking With Bilbo is a book you will get a lot out of. 

    (Tyndale House Publishers has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for this review.  All thoughts and opinions are my
    own.)

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 13, 2012

    Walking with Bilbo was a fun way to combine a great story with B

    Walking with Bilbo was a fun way to combine a great story with Biblical teaching. I am not normally a fan of watering down biblical teaching, but if you are looking for a way to get a non-scholarly christian to study more... this is the way.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2012

    Great for individuals or small groups looking for a guide to fai

    Great for individuals or small groups looking for a guide to faith-related themes in The Hobbit. Easy to read, unpretentious and helpful for everyone from those new to Bilbo's adventures to lifelong Tolkien fans.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 18, 2012

    I think I liked Ed Strauss¿ ¿Hobbit Devotional¿ better, but this

    I think I liked Ed Strauss’ “Hobbit Devotional” better, but this one was also an excellent read and very enjoyable. Each chapter will take you 5-15 minutes to read (depending on how fast of a reader you are), and includes a bit of “Hobbit” story in (naturally) chronological order. After the story part, it goes on to an application, some questions to consider, and five or more Bible passages related to the topic. There are a total of 22 chapters. The questions are amazing (they WILL leave you thinking!). Chapter titles include (among others) “Plans Go Astray,” “Help Un-Looked For,” “Stick to the Path,” “True Identity,” and “Where Your Treasure Is.” The book is full of excellent writing, and I would certainly recommend it for “Hobbit” fans of both the movie and the book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2012

    IChooseJoyNow summed up the entire book in her "review"

    IChooseJoyNow summed up the entire book in her "review". No need to read the book now!! One or 2 lines should be the limit for leaving reviews, then nobody can leave their LONG winded babble and wreck books for people!!!

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2014

    Gollum is one of my favorite charactera

    I just love his reactions and voice!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 29, 2013

    t has been years since I read "The Hobbit," and I did

    t has been years since I read "The Hobbit," and I did read most of the "Lord of the Rings" series in addition to seeing the trilogy of films. I knew that there was a spiritual significance in Tokien's books, but I sometimes have struggled to find it. I was excited to get the chance to read through this devotional.

    While I believe that the author's intentions were fantastic, I think she may have either bitten off a little more than she could chew or tried to do what Tolkien never intended. Don't get me wrong-the devotional is fine. She has a quick chapter for different sections of Bilbo's journeys. She carries the theme through well and always backs it up with Scripture. You can also dig deeper with her thought-provoking questions and Bible readings. I just felt that it kind of missed the mark. I would have preferred a series of devotionals that dealt with just one of the books in the series. And I would have even preferred using this as a companion read to Tolkien's original texts. But for the true "Tolkien" fanatics, this is a pretty good read.

    I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated in any way, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 29, 2013

    unique devotional

    A unique devotional integrating the Gospel with the spiritual wisdom of Tolkein's Catholic Christian worldview, as reflected in the adventures of his most famous Hobbit. Each chapter includes insightful questions for self-exploration, as well as several relevant Scriptural citations (both Old and New Testaments.) I think this little volume will be a pleasure to experience and revisit again and again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    GOOD

    READ IT

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Brightkit

    Hello?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    Good

    Pretty good

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)