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Walter Gropius With Adolf Meyer: Haus Auerbach
     

Walter Gropius With Adolf Meyer: Haus Auerbach

by Annemarie Jaeggi (Editor), MartIn Fischer (Text by), Barbara Happe (Text by), Walter Gropius (Contribution by), Adolf Meyer (Contribution by)
 

Haus Auerbach tells the story of an almost forgotten building: the private residence designed for Jewish scientist Felix Auerbach and his wife Anna. Built in 1924, the Auerbach House is one of only six private homes that Walter Gropius ever constructed. Here Gropius realized for the first time his famous “Baukastenprinzip,” which combines the

Overview

Haus Auerbach tells the story of an almost forgotten building: the private residence designed for Jewish scientist Felix Auerbach and his wife Anna. Built in 1924, the Auerbach House is one of only six private homes that Walter Gropius ever constructed. Here Gropius realized for the first time his famous “Baukastenprinzip,” which combines the highest level standardization with the greatest possibilities for variation. The Auerbach House is thus one of the most important examples of early era “Neues Bauen.” Furthermore, it is the only Gropius building with an original colored interior: all of the inside walls and windows were colored based on the ideas of Alfred Arndt, also a member of the Bauhaus. The house, which has always been well conserved, was recently restored to better match its original appearance.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783803006356
Publisher:
Wasmuth, Ernst J. Verlag GmbH & Company
Publication date:
03/02/2004
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
6.92(w) x 9.62(h) x 0.72(d)

Meet the Author

Walter Gropius was born in Berlin in 1883. The son of an architect, he apprenticed with Peter Behrens and established his first practice with Adolph Meyer. In 1919, after serving in the first World War, he was appointed Director of the Bauhaus. As war became eminent, Gropius left the Bauhaus; eventually, he was forced to leave Germany for the United States, where he became a professor at Harvard University. Throughout his career, Gropius created innovative designs that borrowed materials and methods of construction from modern technology. Gropius died in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1969.

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