Waltzing Again: New and Selected Conversations with Margaret Atwood

Waltzing Again: New and Selected Conversations with Margaret Atwood

by Margaret Atwood
     
 

"I don't mind being 'interviewed' any more than I mind Viennese waltzing—that is, my response will depend on the agility and grace and attitude and intelligence of the other person. Some do it well, some clumsily, some step on your toes by accident, and some aim for them."—Margaret Atwood

This gathering of 21 interviews with Margaret AtwoodSee more details below

Overview

"I don't mind being 'interviewed' any more than I mind Viennese waltzing—that is, my response will depend on the agility and grace and attitude and intelligence of the other person. Some do it well, some clumsily, some step on your toes by accident, and some aim for them."—Margaret Atwood

This gathering of 21 interviews with Margaret Atwood covers a broad spectrum of topics. Beginning with Graeme Gibson's "Dissecting the Way a Writer Works" (1972), the conversations provide a forum for Atwood to talk about her own work, her career as a writer, feminism, and Canadian cultural nationalism, and to refute the autobiographical fallacy. These conversations offer what Earl Ingersoll calls "a kind of 'biography' of Margaret Atwood—the only kind of biography she is likely to sanction." Enlivened by Atwood's unfailing sense of humor, the interviews present an invaluable view of a distinguished contemporary writer at work.

From the Interviews:
"Let's not pretend that the interview will necessarily result in any absolute and blinding revelations. Interviews too are an art form; that is to say, they indulge in the science of illusion."
"I don't think you ever know how to write a book. You never know ahead of time. You start every time at zero. A former success doesn't mean that you're not going to make the most colossal failure the next time."

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
Ingersoll has authored and edited a number of books of interviews and literary criticism, including an earlier collection of interviews with Atwood, Margaret Atwood: Conversations (1990). Owing to Atwood's increased literary output and decidedly more international reputation in 2005, Ingersoll felt that an updated collection was needed. Through these "new" chronologically arranged conversations (conducted over four decades), we get a good sense of Atwood's take on literary critics (pedantic), her process of writing (lots of revisions), and her aversion to being labeled (she is informed by her Canadian sensibilities but resists being pigeonholed as a Canadian writer). Echoing throughout the conversations are the same careful choice of words, style of language, sharp wit, and sense of humor that one finds in her writing. Ingersoll's selection supports his thesis of her importance as a major writer and her worldwide renown, with perhaps a bit too much emphasis on her disdain for critics. Not essential reading for Atwood aficionados but certainly informative, this collection is recommended for academic libraries and larger public libraries.-Gina Kaiser, Univ. of the Sciences Lib. in Philadelphia Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780865381179
Publisher:
Ontario Review Books
Publication date:
04/10/2006
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.80(d)

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