War Against Children: The Government's Intrusion into Schools, Families and Communities in Search of a Medical

War Against Children: The Government's Intrusion into Schools, Families and Communities in Search of a Medical "Cure" for Violence

by Peter R. Breggin, Ginger R. Breggin
     
 
The authors of the best-selling Talking back to Prozac expose the government and psychiatric establishment's threat to children.

From the authors of the best-selling Talking Back to Prozac comes the definitive work exposing how mental health agencies and the government are using invalid science for social control rather than addressing the decline of families,

Overview

The authors of the best-selling Talking back to Prozac expose the government and psychiatric establishment's threat to children.

From the authors of the best-selling Talking Back to Prozac comes the definitive work exposing how mental health agencies and the government are using invalid science for social control rather than addressing the decline of families, schools, and communities as well as escalating racism and poverty. In 1992, Dr. Peter Breggin and Ginger Ross inspired a national campaign against the proposed federal "Violence Initiative", which was aimed at identifying inner-city children with alleged defects that were said to make them more violent when they reach adulthood.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Taylor's entry in the cosmology sweeps is a popular treatment of theoretical physics. The King's College (London) professor includes a neat schema for grand unification theory, a precis of the big bang theory and enjoyable treatments of other buzz topics that readers expect after having carried around Stephen Hawking's Brief History of Time for five years. But Taylor is not out to dazzle generalists with concepts like ``hyperspace'' and ``quantum reality.'' His book provides a well-reasoned summary of the most ambitious issues of all or, as Taylor calls them, the ``impossible questions'': How did the universe begin? Why is there something rather than nothing? How can we explain all the complexity in the world? What is consciousness? (Aug.)
Library Journal
Scientific knowledge has expanded to the point where some physicists refer to a "theory of everything" in the offing. Is it possible that science can answer all the big questions? Taylor (mathematics, King's Coll., London) is not so optimistic. Discussing the questions for which science may never provide an answer-not just how the universe started but why-he maintains that science will continue to advance but will never be able to offer solutions. Taylor considers the nature of consciousness and concludes that it will soon be shown to be merely the by-product of electrical and chemical activity in the brain, offering no promise of awareness beyond life. If so, he asks, what is the meaning of life? Taylor concludes that there is no meaning, and he worries about what this will mean for the future of humankind as people come to realize and accept this. For larger science collections.-Harold D. Shane, Baruch Coll., CUNY
William Beatty
Besides the psychiatric establishment, the major pharmaceutical companies stand to profit substantially from pushing the idea that violence can be curbed by keeping violent and potentially violent children continually sedated. The Breggins start off their critique of this "war against children" with the five indicators of what they call the "violence initiative": the federal public health campaign against violence; the public--and the covert--actions of Dr. Frederick Goodwin, the country's most powerful psychiatrist; the pouring of large sums of money into the search for a biological basis for violent crime and antisocial behavior; the Human Genome Project and its promotion of "genetic factors in crime"; and the publicizing of the concept of a genetic predisposition to violence. The rest of the book cites example upon example, many of which amount to racist attacks against African Americans, of these trends in action. The Breggins conclude with information on organizations striving to counter this insidious--as they see it--campaign.
Brenda Grazis
As late as 1988, scientists predicted that a complete theory unifying the forces of nature and answering all possible questions about the universe would be developed by the turn of the century. Taylor believes, however, that any ultimate theory of everything (TOE) must answer the following "impossible" questions: From whence came the energy and matter to create the universe? Why is there matter rather than nothingness? Why is a particular TOE favored over any other? And, how does consciousness arise? In the scientific rhetoric requisite to such concepts, Taylor examines contemporary theories and concludes that the former three questions will remain forever inexplicable. Science will progress toward ever greater precision, but because of infinite regress of theories, a TOE will never be accessible. To illustrate current significant limitations of modern science, Taylor considers briefly three troublesome problems: superconductivity, the phenomenon of turbulence in the flow of fluids, and weather forecasting. A useful reflection on the state of scientific theory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312110659
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
09/01/1994
Edition description:
1st U.S. ed
Pages:
272

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