War and Genocide in Cuba, 1895-1898

War and Genocide in Cuba, 1895-1898

by John Lawrence Tone
     
 

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From 1895 to 1898, Cuban insurgents fought to free their homeland from Spanish rule. Though often overshadowed by the "Splendid Little War" of the Americans in 1898, according to John Tone, the longer Spanish-Cuban conflict was in fact more remarkable, foreshadowing the wars of decolonization in the twentieth century.Employing newly released evidence—including

Overview

From 1895 to 1898, Cuban insurgents fought to free their homeland from Spanish rule. Though often overshadowed by the "Splendid Little War" of the Americans in 1898, according to John Tone, the longer Spanish-Cuban conflict was in fact more remarkable, foreshadowing the wars of decolonization in the twentieth century.Employing newly released evidence—including hospital records, intercepted Cuban letters, battle diaries from both sides, and Spanish administrative records—Tone offers new answers to old questions concerning the war. He examines the origin of Spain's genocidal policy of "reconcentration"; the causes of Spain's military difficulties; the condition, effectiveness, and popularity of the Cuban insurgency; the necessity of American intervention; and Spain's supposed foreknowledge of defeat.The Spanish-Cuban-American war proved pivotal in the histories of all three countries involved. Tone's fresh analysis will provoke new discussions and debates among historians and human rights scholars as they reexamine the war in which the concentration camp was invented, Cuba was born, Spain lost its empire, and America gained an overseas empire.From 1895 to 1898, Cuban insurgents fought to free their homeland from Spanish rule. Though often overshadowed by the "Splendid Little War" of the Americans in 1898, according to John Tone, the longer Spanish-Cuban conflict was in fact more remarkable, foreshadowing the wars of decolonization in the twentieth century.Employing newly released evidence, Tone offers new answers to old questions concerning the war. He examines the origin of Spain's genocidal policy of "reconcentration"; the causes of Spain's military difficulties; the condition, effectiveness, and popularity of the Cuban insurgency; the necessity of American intervention; and Spain's supposed foreknowledge of defeat. The Spanish-Cuban-American war proved pivotal in the histories of all three countries involved. Tone's fresh analysis introduces new topics for discussion and debate among historians and human rights scholars as they reexamine the war in which the concentration camp was invented, Cuba was born, Spain lost its last American colonies, and America gained an overseas empire.—>

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
An engagingly written book that offers new insights into the war. . . .This thought provoking book should be on many bookshelves.—The Past in Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807877302
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
12/08/2006
Series:
Envisioning Cuba
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
File size:
2 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Makes interesting reading and will stir academic debate and inspire further research.—Register of the Kentucky Historical Society

[An] important and engrossing book. . . . A significant work with much to offer historians in Cuba, Spain, and modern war and society in general.—The Americas

Often overshadowed by the U.S. military victory of 1898, the last Spanish-Cuban War has failed to receive the attention from historians that it deserves. This important and engrossing book does much to fill the historiographical gap, providing readers with an excellent account and analysis of the conflict in its military, political, social, and economic dimensions. . . . In addition to its very solid grounding in original research and analysis, the book also benefits from its author's style and narrative technique, which combine to make it highly readable.—The Americas

Tone has drawn a complex and involving historical picture not only of the Spanish reconcentration policy, but of the whole war of Cuban independence. He is to be commended for his skills of interpretation, as well as the smooth and involving quality of his writing. His work will enlighten anyone interested in Cuban history. . . . He has laid an excellent foundation for further comparative investigation, providing a useful resource for genocide scholars interested in colonial warfare.—Journal of Genocide Research

Challenges accepted notions of the Cuban War of Independence and provides an important corrective to studies which have fostered a nationalist interpretation of inevitable triumph.—Canadian Journal of History

Offers many new insights into the Spanish-Cuban-American War or 1895-1898. . . . Uses a unique approach that highlights the lives of a small number of individuals to communicate the more personal experience of war while at the same time exposing larger historical patterns in—and debates about—the war.—New West Indian Guide

Wonderfully informative and balanced. . . . [Tone] provides a fresh understanding of this dismal war, and he has written what is arguably the best single account of it. . . . This is first-rate scholarship.—Journal of American History

Meet the Author

John Tone is professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is author of the award-winning The Fatal Knot: The Guerrilla War in Navarre and the Defeat of Napoleon in Spain (from The University of North Carolina Press).

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