War and Memory in the Twentieth Century

Overview

This unique and absorbing book looks at the ways in which images and memories of war have emerged and endured in the twentieth century. Through a number of studies by the leading experts in the field, ranging from the construction of memorials through to film and personal testimonies, the complex identities of war memories and their social, cultural and political significances are thoroughly discussed.

War and Memory in the Twentieth Century explores differing ways in which ...

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Overview

This unique and absorbing book looks at the ways in which images and memories of war have emerged and endured in the twentieth century. Through a number of studies by the leading experts in the field, ranging from the construction of memorials through to film and personal testimonies, the complex identities of war memories and their social, cultural and political significances are thoroughly discussed.

War and Memory in the Twentieth Century explores differing ways in which memories of conflicts are constructed from a multitude of perspectives and representations, including:
· the written and spoken word
· cinematic and film images
· photography
· monuments and memorials
· museums
· rituals and public celebration

The book also discusses how memories of war differ between nations and individuals, and between proximity and distance in time. Wide-ranging and original, individual essays cover topics such as Anne Frank, British war crimes, the Gulf War in British popular culture, German memory and identity, and popular film. This truly interdisciplinary and wide-ranging book will be of interest to the general reader as well as students and academics of history, war and society, political science, cultural studies and media studies.

Contributors include:
Tony Kushner, Southampton University; David Cesarani, Southampton University; Bernice Archer, Essex University; Jane Leonard, Queens University, Belfast; Lucy Noakes, Sussex University; Margaretta Joly, Sussex University; Catherine Moriarty, Sussex University; Bill Kidd, Stirling University; Sue Harper, Portsmouth University; Martin Shaw, Sussex University; Jeffrey Walsh, Manchester Metropolitan University; Barry Doyle, Durham University; Gerd Knischewski, Portsmouth University.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Books like 'War and Memory', which take history seriously but do not leave it to the historians, are an important step forward." —Christopher Hill, Modern and Contemporary France

"An absorbing look at the way in which images and memories of war have emerged and endured during this century . . .Instructive, informative and undoubtedly sad. A thought-provoking work." —Ships Telegraph

"A welcome addition to the growing number of books which consider the wider social, cultural and political implications of warfare in the twentieth century." —Stephen Croad, Independent Member of the National War Memorials Inventory Committee

"The collection is to be commended for the high quality of its contribution which provide persuasive evidence of how the memory of past conflict infiltrates and colours present culture. [It] deserves to become an edited collection to which scholars and students turban for well balanced and stimulating essays on the continuing dialogue between history and memory in contemporary Western culture." —Jourbanal of Area Studies

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781859731994
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 9/28/1997
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,076,257
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Evans is at the University of Portsmouth.

Kenneth Lunn is at the faculty at the University of Portsmouth.

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Table of Contents

Martin Evans & Kenneth Lunn, Introduction — HOLOCAUST AND WAR CRIMES TRIALS — Tony Kushner, Anne Frank and the Liberal Imagination — David Cesarani, Lacking in Conviction: British War Crimes Policy and National Memory of the Second World War — ORAL TESTIMONIES — Bernice Archer, A Low-Key Affair: Memories of Internment in the Far East during World War Two — Jane Leonard, Facing the 'Finger of Scorn': Veterans' Memories of Ireland after the Great War — Martin Evans, 'Algeria and Vietnam': Two Cases of Traumatised War Veterans — MUSEUMS — Lucy Noakes, Making Histories: Exploring the Blitz in London Museums in the 1990's — Margaretta Joly, Love Letters vs. Letters Carved in Stone: Gender, Memory and the 'Forces Sweethearts' Exhibition — MONUMENTS — Catherine Moriarty, Private Grief and Public Remembrance: British First World War Memorials — Bill Kidd, Memory and Commemoration of War in Lorraine, 1909-79 — FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHY — Sue Harper, Popular Film, Popular Memory: the Case of the Second World War — POPULAR MEMORY — Martin Shaw, Past Wars and Present Conflict: From the Second World War — Jeffrey Walsh, The Gulf War in British Popular Culture — Barry Doyle, Religion, Politics and Remembrance: a Free Church Community and its Great War Dead — Gerd Knischewski, German Memory and Identity

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