War at Sea: A Naval History of World War II

War at Sea: A Naval History of World War II

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by Nathan Miller
     
 

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From the sinking of the British passenger liner Athenia on September 3, 1939, by a German U-boat (against orders), to the Japanese surrender onboard the Missouri, on September 2, 1945, War at Sea covers every major naval battle of World War II. War at Sea is a comprehensive history for the general reader that details the operations of all the combatants. For the first… See more details below

Overview

From the sinking of the British passenger liner Athenia on September 3, 1939, by a German U-boat (against orders), to the Japanese surrender onboard the Missouri, on September 2, 1945, War at Sea covers every major naval battle of World War II. War at Sea is a comprehensive history for the general reader that details the operations of all the combatants. For the first time equal weight has been given to the battles fought by the four primary navies - the U.S., the British, the German, and the Japanese. It also includes the vital role played by the Canadian, Italian, and Soviet navies. Using archival material such as intelligence documents, ship logs, official reports, and interviews with surviving servicemen, Nathan Miller has written a lively and fascinating book that focuses on the stories of the men involved. War at Sea is filled with anecdotes and personal accounts, giving a complete picture of the human side of the struggle and what life at sea was like - from being hit by torpedoes to living in the confines of a submarine for weeks at a time. Mr. Miller gives the political and historical background necessary to analyze the strategies of the combatants.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
With authoritative analysis, and in one volume, Miller majestically relates the history of the last great sea war for the general reader, from the sinking of the passenger ship Athenia on September 3, 1939, to the surrender ceremony aboard the USS Missouri on September 2, 1945. The battle to secure the seas was the one campaign fought from the beginning of the conflict to its conclusion. The narrative covers the major operations of the American, British, Canadian, Soviet, German, Japanese and Italian navies, with recollections by those who manned the ships and planes. Miller's sweeping version of the Battle of the Atlantic-German U-boats versus Allied convoys-confirms that victory went to the Allies when American shipyards succeeded in producing merchant vessels faster than the Germans could sink them. His compelling account of the turning-point Battle of Midway reveals how the supremacy of carrier aircraft as the decisive factor in modern naval warfare was established. Miller is the author of FDR: An Intimate History. History Book Club main selection; BOMC alternate. (Sept.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Miller, whose book The U.S. Navy: An Illustrated History (Morrow, 1990. rev. ed.) is used as a text at the Naval Academy, has written a book that is as captivating and intriguing as a novel. It tells all sides of the history of naval warfare during World War II. Each chapter deals with a specific campaign or policy. A positive point of the work is that Miller didn't write a sanitized history. He clearly presents mistakes, both good and bad, and good or bad judgment from all sides. Extensive footnotes provide additional information, anecdotes, and clarifications of official accounts. Essential for libraries dealing with military and American history and highly recomended for other libraries.-Terry Wirick, Erie Cty. Lib. System, Pa.
Booknews
Describes every major naval battle of WWII from 1939 to 1945, with details on all combatants, including the four primary navies of the US, Britain, Germany, and Japan, as well as the Canadian, Italian, and Soviet navies. Draws on archival materials and interviews with surviving servicemen and emphasizing personal accounts and anecdotes and to discuss the use of new technology of warfare such as submarines and aircraft carriers which replaced reliance on battleships. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Roland Green
Miller has written four previous volumes of popular naval history--plenty of practice to make his fifth a superior example of the one-volume naval war history. During World War II, naval power moved into three dimensions of combat--air, surface, and undersea--and this development as well as the sheer number of combatants involved make it a daunting task to compress such hefty subject matter into a single volume of reasonable size. Although every reader will find some favorite incident left out or interpreted in a way that will raise their eyebrows, Miller is at his best with straight narrative. Yet his analyses are also sound: for instance, U.S. productive capacity "was" the decisive factor in the Allies' naval victory; also, its U-boats "were" the only potentially decisive naval advantage Germany possessed after failing to win the Battle of Britain; and Douglas MacArthur "was" a better politician than strategist. Equipped with fine notes and a bibliography for the scholarly reader, the book yet aims more at informal students of World War II--a target audience it squarely hits. Highly recommended.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684803807
Publisher:
Scribner
Publication date:
08/01/1995
Pages:
592
Product dimensions:
6.47(w) x 9.56(h) x 1.33(d)

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