War, Battering, and Other Sports: The Gulf between American Men and Women

Overview

This book explores the relationship between male games and violence against women by examining various theoretical rubrics, including the classic "Authoritarian Personality" model of Theodor Adorno, Nevitt Sanford, et al., Rene Girard’s theory of scapegoating, Georges Bataille’s depiction of male sexuality, and Luce Irigaray’s post-Lacanian critique of androcentrism. McBride suggests that battering—like such male territorial games as war and its simulation, football—is symptomatic of a masculinist psychic economy...

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Amherst 1995 Paperback New. 220 p. Illustrations. Intended for college/higher education audience. Intended for professional and scholarly audience. *****PLEASE NOTE: This item ... is shipping from an authorized seller in Europe. In the event that a return is necessary, you will be able to return your item within the US. To learn more about our European sellers and policies see the BookQuest FAQ section***** Read more Show Less

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Overview

This book explores the relationship between male games and violence against women by examining various theoretical rubrics, including the classic "Authoritarian Personality" model of Theodor Adorno, Nevitt Sanford, et al., Rene Girard’s theory of scapegoating, Georges Bataille’s depiction of male sexuality, and Luce Irigaray’s post-Lacanian critique of androcentrism. McBride suggests that battering—like such male territorial games as war and its simulation, football—is symptomatic of a masculinist psychic economy predicated on deep-seated anxieties and expressed through hostility toward women. Rejecting the principle voices of the "men’s movement" (e.g., Robert Bly, Sam Keen) as an alternative to the dominant model of masculinity in American culture, the book concludes that only radical changes in child-rearing practices can effect a new male subjectivity, freed from the compulsion to do violence against women.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Noting that war, football, and battering are all male practices that brutalize "the other," McBride (religion and social ethics, Fordham U.) suggests that the only way to end "the war between the sexes" is to radically change our child-rearing practices to effect a new male subjectivity. McBride also rejects the "men's movement" espoused by Robert Bly and others, citing its frequent articulation of misogynistic views and its isolation of men from women. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Meet the Author

James McBride teaches religion and social ethics at Fordham University.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Preface
1 From Baghdad to Battering: Male Territorial Games and the Abuse of Women 1
2 America's War in the Gulf: Phallic and Castration Imagery in the Rhetoric of Combat 35
3 From Battle Front to Home Front: Football Metaphors and America's "Superbowl" 77
4 Scapegoating the Emasculated: Social Psychological Models of Authoritarianism and Sacrificial Violence 107
5 Descent into the Masculinist Psychic Economy: Bataillean and Irigarayan Models of Interpretation 140
6 The Men's Movement: An Alternative to "Acting Out" Male Hysteria? 177
Index 215
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