War Diary of a Union Woman in the South

War Diary of a Union Woman in the South

3.5 2
by G.W. Cable
     
 
This is the diary of an anonymous pro-Union Southern Woman. The Editor, George Washington Cable (1844-1925, knew but did not reveal her name. Her journal starts in 1861 New Orleans, a new marriage in January 1862 takes her to plantation in SE Arkansas and by early 1863 she and her husband are forced to take refugee in Vicksburg during the Federal Siege.

Overview

This is the diary of an anonymous pro-Union Southern Woman. The Editor, George Washington Cable (1844-1925, knew but did not reveal her name. Her journal starts in 1861 New Orleans, a new marriage in January 1862 takes her to plantation in SE Arkansas and by early 1863 she and her husband are forced to take refugee in Vicksburg during the Federal Siege. Excerpt from March 1863:

March 20.—The slow shelling of Vicksburg goes on all the time, and we have grown indifferent. It does not at present interrupt or interfere with daily avocations, but I suspect they are only getting the range of different points; and when they have them all complete, showers of shot will rain on us all at once. Non-combatants have been ordered to leave or prepare accordingly. Those who are to stay are having caves built. Cave-digging has become a regular business; prices range from twenty to fifty dollars, according to size of cave. Two diggers worked at ours a week and charged thirty dollars. It is well made in the hill that slopes just in the rear of the house, and well propped with thick posts, as they all are. It has a shelf also, for holding a light or water. When we went in this evening and sat down, the earthy, suffocating feeling, as of a living tomb, was dreadful to me. I fear I shall risk death outside rather than melt in that dark furnace. The hills are so honeycombed with caves that the streets look like avenues in a cemetery. The hill called the Sky-parlor has become quite a fashionable resort for the few upper-circle families left here. Some officers are quartered there, and there is a band and a field-glass. Last evening we also climbed the hill to watch the shelling, but found the view not so good as on a quiet hill nearer home. Soon a lady began to talk to one of the officers: "It is such folly for them to waste their ammunition like that. How can they ever take a town that has such advantages for defense and protection as this? We'll just burrow into these hills and let them batter away as hard as they please.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012278159
Publisher:
Cherry Lane Ebooks
Publication date:
03/17/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
683,188
File size:
659 KB

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War Diary of a Union Woman in the South 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
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