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The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age

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Overview

In this witty, far-reaching, and utterly original work, Allucquère Rosanne Stone examines the myriad ways modern technology is challenging traditional notions of gender identity.Face-to-face meetings, and even telephone conversations,involuntarily reveal crucial aspects of identity such as gender, age, and race.

However, these bits of identity are completely masked by computer-mediated communications; all that is revealed is what we choose to reveal — and then only if we choose to tell the truth. The rise of computer-mediated communications is giving people the means to try on alternative personae — in a sense, to reinvent themselves — which, as Stone compellingly argues, has both positive and potentially destructive implications.

Not a traditional text but rather a series of intellectual provocations, the book moves between fascinating accounts of the modern interface of technology and desire: from busy cyberlabs to the electronic solitude of the Internet, from phone sex to "virtual cross-dressers," and from the trial of a man accused of having raped a woman by seducing one of her multiple personalities to the Vampire Lestat.Throughout, Stone wrestles with the question of how best to convey a complex description of a culture whose chief activity is complex description. Writing eloquently of creating a "text that breaks rules," serving as a "sampler of possible choices," she employs elements from a wide range of disciplines and genres, including cultural and critical theory, social sciences,pulp journalism, science fiction, and personal memoirs.

Each chapter of the book can be read as a kind of performance piece, with its own individual voice and structure. In the final chapter, Stone threads the various narratives together, holding them in productive tension rather than attempting to collapse them into a single unifying statement: a process that best reflects the confused, ambiguous, and sometimes contradictory state of gender relations at the close of the mechanical age.

Not a traditional text but rather a series of intellectual provocations, this book moves between fascinating accounts of the modern interface of technology and desire--from busy cyberlabs to the electronic solitude of the Internet, from phone sex to "virtual cross-dressers." Stone examines the myriad ways modern technology is challenging traditional notions of gender identity.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The author (director, Interactive Multimedia Lab, U. of Texas, Austin) looks at the ways modern communications technologies such as e-mail and Internet chat spaces are transforming our erotic sensibilities and tinkering with our sense of identity. Messages sent into cyberspace require us to reveal little about ourselves, she argues, or enable us to try on alternate personas, a fact of virtual life that she finds both exciting and potentially dangerous. Of interest to readers concerned with the social and ethical ramifications of the information era. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262691895
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/1996
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: Sex, Death, and Machinery, or How I Fell in Love with My Prosthesis 1
1 Collective Structures 33
2 Risking Themselves: Identity in Oshkosh 45
3 In Novel Conditions: The Cross-Dressing Psychiatrist 65
4 Reinvention and Encounter: Pause for Theory 83
5 Agency and Proximity: Communities/CommuniTrees 99
6 The End of Innocence, Part I: Cyberdammerung at the Atari Lab 123
7 The End of Innocence, Part II: Cyberdammerung at Wellspring Systems 157
8 Conclusion: The Gaze of the Vampire 165
Notes 185
Bibliography 201
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