The War of the Worlds, Plus Blood, Guts and Zombies

The War of the Worlds, Plus Blood, Guts and Zombies

3.9 16
by H. G. Wells, Eric Brown
     
 

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THE CLASSIC SCIENCE FICTION TALE THAT WILL EAT YOUR BRAINS!

Never before in the history of warfare had destruction been so indiscriminate and so universal.

Panic descends upon planet Earth once more as H. G. Wells’s terrify- ing cosmic invaders blaze a path of fiery destruction across Victorian England, leaving thousands of un

Overview

THE CLASSIC SCIENCE FICTION TALE THAT WILL EAT YOUR BRAINS!

Never before in the history of warfare had destruction been so indiscriminate and so universal.

Panic descends upon planet Earth once more as H. G. Wells’s terrify- ing cosmic invaders blaze a path of fiery destruction across Victorian England, leaving thousands of undead in their wake. Our adventurous narrator must survive the apocalyptic alien threat while fighting off rag- ing, bloodthirsty zombies. Who will triumph when man, Martian, and flesh-eating monster meet? Packed with fearsome supernatural creatures at every turn, Wells’s original masterpiece is scarier, gorier, and more suspenseful than ever!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Like the undead, Eric S. Brown is an unstoppable force in the genre. His fiction consistently delivers jolts to the heart and mind." - David Dunwoody, author of Empire and Dark Entities

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781451611359
Publisher:
Gallery Books
Publication date:
12/14/2010
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
916,587
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

H.G. Wells is considered by many to be the father of science fiction. He was the author of numerous classics such as The Invisible Man, The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The War of the Worlds, and many more. 
Eric S. Brown is the author of World War of the Dead, Season of Rot, and Barren Earth. Some of his past works include Cobble, Madmen’s Dreams, and Unabridged Unabashed and Undead: The Best of Eric S. Brown, among others. His short fiction has been published hundreds of times and he was featured as an expert on the walking dead in the book, Zombie CSU. Eric lives in NC with his loving wife, Shanna, and his son, Merrick.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 21, 1866
Date of Death:
August 13, 1946
Place of Birth:
Bromley, Kent, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Normal School of Science, London, England

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War of the Worlds, Plus Blood, Guts and Zombies 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dubliner res 1-1000000 [multires] <br>Spolia res 1-14 res 15 bio res 16 map rules. <br>Notice these are rp that are on 24-7 since jan 1 2012 and 13
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She calmly walked in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sat in his RV
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Insain much?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He breathes a quick sigh of relief. "Hi," he repeated awkwardly. "I'm Eden."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She walked in, a small hunting knife in a sheathe on her brown lether belt. She stood infront if Luma d stated bravely,"How do I get a REAL weapon? Do I have to kill? Get supplies? Tell me now."
penandtome More than 1 year ago
Invaders from the Red Planet come to earth, causing zombies to swarm the planet, thus threatening all of mankind instead of just Great Britain. *** The possibility of life on other planets has been written about in many genres, especially science fiction. Author Eric S. Brown's fascination with zombies has led him to modify H.G. Wells classic, "War of the Worlds". While the Mars invaders in that original novel were limited to Great Britain, here zombies are created worldwide, as particles falling off the Martian spaceships spread throughout earth's atmosphere. Brown's version can be liken to his purchase of a frosted cake from a bakery to which he added a few sprinkles for decoration whereupon he takes credit for creating the entire confection. To say that the addition of zombies to this timeless tale is superficial is an understatement. Unlike Well's original, this version needs additional editing. There are some sentences with either a misspelled or missing word. For example on page 87, "It was my unfortunate luck that a dead man already killed the ditch home." There are also a few minor formatting issues, although they do not affect the flow of the story. Readers interested in other War of the Worlds adaptations can read George H. Smith's, "The Second War of the Worlds"; Was and Manly Wade Wellman's "Sherlock Holmes' War of the Worlds"; J.M. Dillard's "War of the World's: The Resurrection"; Max Allan Collin's "War of the Worlds Murder"; Tony Wright's "War of the Worlds: Aftermath"; Douglas Niles' "War of the Worlds: New Millennium"; Gabriel Mesta's "The Martian Wars"; or, "War of the Worlds: Global Dispatch" edited by Kevin J. Anderson. Readers interested in other zombie tales can read any one of Eric E. Brown's numerous books on zombies or "World War Z" and "The Zombie Survival Guide" by Max Brooks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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TheStephanieLoves More than 1 year ago
I haven't read the original The War of the Worlds, so when I picked up The War of the Worlds, Plus Blood, Guts, and Zombies, I wasn't entirely sure what to expect. Maybe if I had read the rudimentary novel, I could have enjoyed it more, but not having done so, I found much of this book disappointing. I normally am a fan of science fiction because of the element of the gory and of the unknown. I was excited to read this because I knew it would involve zombies, but the zombies played very minute roles in the plot. I'm not sure why this had to be drawn out to 306 pages, but the best way I can explain what happens is that a mysterious cylinder carrying Martians appears, containing a Heat-Ray gun that zaps dead people into zombies. A few days later, another cylinder appears, containing more Martians, and another gun. Then a THIRD cylinder appears...and it's pretty much self-explanatory from there. Aside from the three cylinder appearances, nothing actually happened within the book, making it really hard to finish. In terms of style, it wasn't difficult to get through, which was pleasant because usually classics take a little more analyzing than usual. The quality of the writing however, was very bland and unmoving. There's this one scene with the zombies that attempts to be extremely bloodletting: "Their brains must have cooked inside their skulls like eggs frying in a pan." Okay, "eggs frying in a pan"? Real original. Real horrific. Nothing particularly motivated me to keep reading. It took me a while to finish the whole novel, and though it was a pretty facile read, in the end, I felt like I didn't get anything out of it. The War of the Worlds, Plus Blood, Guts, and Zombies wasn't the worst I've read, but it definitely isn't something I'd be interested in reading again. The monotonous way the author writes seems to drone on and on, and the action never presents itself as suspenseful or the least bit amusing, even. Radical Rating: 5 hearts- Satisfying for a first read, but I'm not going back.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Mars is dying, but the inhabitants see earth as their next home. Knowing they are a thousand rimes smarter and even more advanced than humans, they expect no problems conquering the third planet. He sees an odd green light pass near his residence. He goes to look and finds a spacecraft. The inhabitants are mostly brains with tentacles using mechanical bodies for locomotion. More space ships follow as the invasion of earth has begun. When the Martians kill a human, the latter do not stay dead; instead they return as mindless carnivores seeking live human meat. The Martians did not expect this second order effect and their scientists struggle to find a way to kill the rising reanimated dead. The observer watches much of the invasion and the zombie counter insurgency. Just when it seems the angry red planet expatriates conquered earth, bacteria attacks the Martians. Eric S. Brown adds a relatively smooth major "Blood, Guts and Zombies" subplot to the original War of the Worlds. Though purists will ask why the Z treatment to this classic, the story line is lighthearted fun; unless you happen to be trapped between zombie and Martian fevers. The blending works for an enjoyable science fiction horror thriller though with Austen, Twain, and Lincoln fighting zombies in a sub-genre losing its freshness, who is next, Darth Vader? Harriet Klausner
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