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War of Words: Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War Press
     

War of Words: Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War Press

by Harry J. Maihafer
 

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A shrewd politician, Abraham Lincoln recognized the power of the press. He knew that, at most, a few thousand people might hear one of his speeches in person, but countless readers across the nation would absorb his message through newspapers. While he was always under fire by some hostile portion of the openly partisan nineteenth-century media, through the careful

Overview

A shrewd politician, Abraham Lincoln recognized the power of the press. He knew that, at most, a few thousand people might hear one of his speeches in person, but countless readers across the nation would absorb his message through newspapers. While he was always under fire by some hostile portion of the openly partisan nineteenth-century media, through the careful cultivation of relationships Lincoln successfully wooed numerous prominent newspapermen into aiding his agenda. Whether he was editing his own speech in a newspaper office or inviting reporters to the White House to leak a story, the President skillfully steered the Union through the perils of war by playing his own version of the public relations game.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Modern politicians are quite aware that the support of the press can make or break their careers. Here, Maihafer, a West Point graduate, retired U.S. Army officer, and author of The General and the Journalists: Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Charles Dana, examines the media savvy of Abraham Lincoln, long recognized as a masterly politician. Tracing the evolution of Lincoln's political career and his relationship with the press, he demonstrates how Lincoln, who was not as highly regarded in his day as he would become later, worked with this important group to promote himself and his agenda and build support for the Union cause. This engagingly written book would be enjoyed by the general reader, but because so much has been written on Lincoln, libraries that already own, for example, Michael Burlingame's Lincoln's Journalist: John Hay's Anonymous Writings for the Press, 1860-1864 or Lincoln Observed: The Civil War Dispatches of Noah Brooks, which examines Lincoln's relationship with individual writers, may wish to think twice about buying it. Theresa R. McDevitt, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612344355
Publisher:
Potomac Books, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/2001
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,157,149
File size:
2 MB

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