Warblers of the Great Lakes and Eastern North America

Overview

Thanks to their distinctive colors and lively calls, warblers are a favorite among birders. However sightings can be rare due to the warbler's migratory nature, feeding habits, and sometime-endangered status.

Warblers is a handy reference for watching these fast-moving and elusive birds. It explains why warblers are difficult to spot and what you can do to see more of them. It accurately identifies 42 species found in the Great Lakes region and eastern North America. By focusing...

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Overview

Thanks to their distinctive colors and lively calls, warblers are a favorite among birders. However sightings can be rare due to the warbler's migratory nature, feeding habits, and sometime-endangered status.

Warblers is a handy reference for watching these fast-moving and elusive birds. It explains why warblers are difficult to spot and what you can do to see more of them. It accurately identifies 42 species found in the Great Lakes region and eastern North America. By focusing on this one family within a defined geographical area, the book's format is compact yet packed with information.

Photographing these highly spirited birds is never easy. Birders will appreciate the crisp, clean images of the warblers in their natural environment. Comparison pages group similar-looking birds on a single spread for quick reference. Each species is presented in accurate, full color to ensure precise identification.
Species are presented in taxonomic order to show how one relates to the next. The information is concisely organized and includes:

  • Common names
  • Biological classification
  • Distinctive markings
  • Seasonal plumage changes
  • Song description
  • Behavioral habits
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Editorial Reviews

BirdWatcher's Digest - W.H. Gross
Well-done, birder-friendly guides that fit easily into any field pack and are recommended for both beginning and advanced birders.
International Hawkwatcher - Donald S. Heintzelman
This book gives birders an excellent resource for enjoying these colorful and much beloved birds.
Booklist - Nancy Bent
These tidy little books provide nice introductions ... terrific primer.
Essex Free Press
Essential field guide ... packed with crisp, clean full-color photographs and precise identification notes to clearly define 35 species.
Choice - C. Leck
Excellent field photographs and a text of precise identification notes ... handy and attractive ... Highly recommended.
Science Books and Films - William H. Adams
Excellent coverage of all North American warblers. This is an outstanding publication and supplement to standard field guides.
Princeton Times of Trenton
Makes identifying these remarkable and diverse families of birds as easy as possible.
American Reference Books Annual, Volume 35 - Charles Leck
The author of these guides is a naturalist/teacher who clearly knows how to present bird-identification information in an organized, attractive, and educational format.
Toronto Ornithological Club - George Bryant
Lovely books ... the range maps are the first I've seen in any guide that fully delineate both breeding range and wintering range.
E-Streams - Diane C. Schmidt
Colorful photographic guides... delightful companions for beginning birders in eastern North America.
Bird Times
The most comprehensive information on several targeted species, packed in a colorful, convenient format.
Minneapolis Star Tribune - Jim Williams
Less can be more. That's the case with [this book]... two pages are devoted to each species of warbler, which allows room for multiple photos, range maps and informative text.
New Hampshire Wildlife - Bill Carney
Highly illustrated with exquisite color photographs in a natural setting... a welcome addition to my library.
Ibis - Charles F. Thompson
Intended to help birders... they generally succeed, accurately portraying sexual and seasonal differences in plumage.
Montreal Gazette - David Bird
Excellent information, more than 200 quality color photographs and delightful prose make these must-have guides.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552977095
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 2/1/2003
  • Series: Firefly Birding Guides
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 585,616
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Chris Earley is the Interpretive Naturalist at the University of Guelph's Arboretum. He is an active birder whose field guide to sparrows and finches is also available in this series.

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Table of Contents

Welcome to the world of warblers

How to use this book

A note to beginners

The quotes

Taxonomy

Identification features

Seasonal status of warblers

Listing of species each on a double page spread and illustrated with multiple photographs. The listing includes common and Latin species name, description, range map, and identification prompts.
- Blue-winged Warbler
- Golden-winged Warbler
- Blue-winged/Golden-winged Hybrids
- Tennessee Warbler
- Orange-crowned Warbler
- Nashville Warbler
- Northern Parula
- Yellow Warbler
- Chestnut-sided Warbler
- Magnolia Warbler
- Black-throated Blue Warbler
- Cape May Warbler
- Yellow-rumped
"Myrtle" Warbler
- Black-throated Green Warbler
- Blackburnian Warbler
- Yellow-throated Warbler
- Pine Warbler
- Kirtland's Warbler
- Prairie Warbler
- Palm Warbler
- Bay-breasted Warbler
- Blackpoll Warbler
- Cerulean Warbler
- Black-and-white Warbler
- American Redstart
- Prothonotary Warbler
- Worm-eating Warbler
- Ovenbird
- Northern Waterthrush
- Louisiana Waterthrush
- Kentucky Warbler
- Connecticut Warbler
- Mourning Warbler
- Common Yellowthroat
- Hooded Warbler
- Wilson's Warbler
- Canada Warbler
- Yellow-breasted Chat

Vagrants & Stragglers
- Virginia's Warbler
-
Yellow-rumped "Audubon's" Warbler
- Black-throated Gray Warbler
- Townsend's Warbler
- Hermit Warbler
- Swainson's Warbler
- MacGillivray's Warbler
- Painted Redstart

What can I do to help warblers?

References

Cheat sheets

Author's notes

Index

Comparison charts
- Waterthrush Comparison Chart
- Fall Comparison 1
- Fall Comparison 2
- Fall Comparison 3
- Spring Comparison

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Preface

Welcome to the world of warblers

This book is designed to help you learn about the many warbler species that can be found in the Great Lakes region. Because there are many different learning styles, this book presents warblers in a variety of ways. It is designed for both beginners and the experienced, covering the relatively easy spring males as well as the more difficult fall plumages.

When trying to identify birds it is important to remember the following motto: I don't know.

Really, it's okay to say it! Too many birders will get an inconclusive view of a bird and then just guess. With practice, you can identify birds from incredibly short glimpses of them, but there will always be some "I don't knows." And even if you do get a good look and still can't identify the warbler, you will have learned from the process. The next time you see that species,
it will be familiar to you and you may see another field mark or behavior to help in its identification. And don't forget to watch the warblers as well! Keeping a checklist is fun and a way to record your sightings, but careful observations will help you really understand these interesting birds. Watching warblers in their environment reveals interactions that link all of nature together.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Welcome to the world of warblers

This book is designed to help you learn about the many warbler species that can be found in the Great Lakes region. Because there are many different learning styles, this book presents warblers in a variety of ways. It is designed for both beginners and the experienced, covering the relatively easy spring males as well as the more difficult fall plumages.

When trying to identify birds it is important to remember the following motto: I don't know.

Really, it's okay to say it! Too many birders will get an inconclusive view of a bird and then just guess. With practice, you can identify birds from incredibly short glimpses of them, but there will always be some "I don't knows." And even if you do get a good look and still can't identify the warbler, you will have learned from the process. The next time you see that species, it will be familiar to you and you may see another field mark or behavior to help in its identification. And don't forget to watch the warblers as well! Keeping a checklist is fun and a way to record your sightings, but careful observations will help you really understand these interesting birds. Watching warblers in their environment reveals interactions that link all of nature together.

Read More Show Less

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