Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather [NOOK Book]

Overview

"Warnings" is a true story written in the style of a mystery novel. It tells the gripping story of how courageous scientists unravelled the mystery of violent storms. Fighting fear, bureaucracy, and Mother Nature, these scientists created today's storm warning system that saves so many lives."Warnings" also describes the future natural disasters that continue to lurk and what we can do to prevent loss of life in the future.

Author Mike Smith is an award-winning meteorologist and scientist who was one of the ...
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Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather

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Overview

"Warnings" is a true story written in the style of a mystery novel. It tells the gripping story of how courageous scientists unravelled the mystery of violent storms. Fighting fear, bureaucracy, and Mother Nature, these scientists created today's storm warning system that saves so many lives."Warnings" also describes the future natural disasters that continue to lurk and what we can do to prevent loss of life in the future.

Author Mike Smith is an award-winning meteorologist and scientist who was one of the creators of the warning system and describes its history from a first-hand perspective.

The hardcover edition has received superb interviews and there are additional photos and text in the eBook version.

Anyone who has ever flown, has an interest in weather, or enjoys a great narrative non-fiction read will love "Warnings."
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Editorial Reviews

Betty Gelean
"'Warnings/ is very easy to read for the layman... The book is historical, accurate, and personal. I was hooked on the Introduction which primes the reader for the main event, or in this case, events to come...This is a fascinating book, full of suspense, telling it like it is, and a great learning experience without realizing just how much of what you read will stay with you. I highly recommend this book.
Publisher's Weekly
"This account of people who do something about the weather should appeal to just about anyone who enjoys talking about it. Photos."
Tom Fuller
"The weatherman's version of 'The Right Stuff.' I recommend it highly."
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013596214
  • Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group, LLC
  • Publication date: 5/23/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 576,486
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Mike Smith is the founder of WeatherData Services, Inc. and a Senior Vice President with AccuWeather. Mr. Smith is a board certified consulting meteorologist and a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He is one of the creators of the storm warning system that is estimated to save more than one thousands lives per year in the U.S.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    I love reading books about the weather, and there are several gr

    I love reading books about the weather, and there are several great books out there about grand-scale disasters that shape us. WARNINGS looks at these storms through the lens of a meteorologist dedicated to predicting storms. Mike Smith shows us how these major storms have shaped our understanding of the science of weather, as well as how our growing understanding of weather shaped our ability to warn citizens, plan for disaster, and ultimately save lives. It is also a history of the meteorologists who continued to study dangerous weather and a government that stymied them at almost every turn. It's a smart, fascinating, and highly accessible read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2011

    I wish there were more than 5 stars to give this book!

    This is an excellent book! I loved EVERY page and EVERY minute reading it. It's written purposefully to not read like a technical science or boring history book and is a quick, very enjoyable read.

    The book reads more like a suspense thriller or mystery novel as Smith keeps the reader ever eager to hear more throughout his story-telling method of advancing the history of meteorology. Along the way the reader learns a tremendous amount of very interesting things - but the secret is they're presented almost as sidebars to the main story of a given storm.

    Not only does Smith advance the history of weather forecasting, but also mixes in the psyche of the individuals drawn to the profession of weather forecaster, a bit of his own biography and a whole host of interesting weather facts. And the most clever part of it all is how much one learns reading this book almost without realizing it.

    I hated to put it down and would highly recommend this book to readers of all interests - even those with the remotest interest in weather.

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  • Posted February 24, 2011

    A must read for anyone with an interest in weather - very enjoyable!!

    Of all the things we take for granted, weather forecasting and severe weather warnings probably rank up near the top. We normally only notice - and complain - when forecasts are wrong; praise for accurate reporting just doesn't happen. Meteorologist and author Mike Smith hopes to bring a more positive light to the criticized field of forecasting while exploring the history of weather warnings in his book, "Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather". "Warnings" is an intriguing look at the development of early warning systems and the difficulties in deciphering constantly-changing weather patterns. While many have the ability to write a book such as this, Mike Smith has the unique advantage of claiming, 'But I've been a major player in its improvements!' The book gives readers a firsthand account of some of the most disastrous storms of the last half century, showing Smith in the forefront of technological advances. Further, he describes early weather forecasting protocol and the surprising fact that at one time, forecasters were not supposed to give severe weather warnings! Smith goes on to detail lives lost in the government's efforts to stay out of the warning business and his own struggle to overcome that political red tape. The inclusion of pictures further illustrated how important early warning systems are to life and property. The book ends on a positive note, giving the reader a sense of relief as he describes current warning practices while alluding to the fact that there are plenty of advancements yet to be made. "Warnings" is the perfect read those with any level of interest in weather - from a healthy curiosity to a professional involvement; storm chasers and meteorologists alike will find it as informing as it is entertaining. As someone who has very recently earned her masters in emergency management, "Warnings" gave me plenty of alternative viewpoints to think about. For example, I'd never considered the 'disconnect' between a meteorologist's warning and the political resistance of initiating action before it's absolutely necessary (read: Hurricane Katrina). Normally it's viewed as the emergency manager's inability to get proactive support but in actuality that process starts as far back as the initial weather forecasts - that crucial step we take for granted. "Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather" gives you a fresh perspective on the field of meteorology and the history of severe weather warnings. Smith has passion and a child-like fascination with weather which emanates from the pages. I absolutely loved how his obvious devotion to the subject came out in each and every sentence. Very enjoyable and educational read! Vicki Landes, author of "Europe for the Senses - A Photographic Journal"

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  • Posted November 28, 2010

    Who knew a book on weather could be so exiting?

    My first thought when I finished this book was, "Who knew weather could be so exiting?" (Except maybe my sister how loves to stand outside and watch tornados.) I bought the book, not my normal type of reading material, for a couple of reasons. The author spoke at our Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon and I found his presentation and story-telling style engaging. I also remember watching Mike Smith as a meteorologist on the local TV station as I was growing up and he was always my favorite. The book was probably more personal to me because, for the most part, I knew many of the towns and storms that were discussed. I know what it's like driving into my hometown the day after a tornado and the sick feeling in my stomach seeing the destruction. What I had no idea about was how the warning system that exists today evolved. I had no clue about the "ban" on tornado warnings until the late 1950s or how the evolution of radars and other storm prediction methods had come about. This book reads like a thriller. It kept me wanting to read "just one more chapter." It has some interactive components that can be accessed via the internet, including "The Miracle at Greensburg" the author's presentation that was similar to what he delivered at our luncheon. I finished the book in two days and truly enjoyed every chapter. In my opinion, anyone who grew up or lives in "tornado alley", likes weather, or anyone that likes a "thriller" will enjoy this book. I know that I already have a list of people that want me to "pass it on" to them next.

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  • Posted August 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A fascinating book, full of suspense, telling it like it is, a great learning experience

    When I first requested this book for review, little did I know I would be reading it and beginning my review amidst forest fires, smoky air, and strong wind gusts! Weather has always fascinated me, not only because "everybody talks about the weather"!

    "Warnings" is very easy to read for the layman. I was shocked to learn there were no tornado warnings as recently as the 1950s, in some areas of the U.S. much more recently. How many lives must have been lost needlessly in past years? Mike Smith has done his research, has lived his research, and knows how to deliver it. The book is historical, accurate, and personal. The Introduction hooked me, priming the reader for the main event, or in this case events, to come in this book.

    Smith gradually builds from its early beginnings the study and workings of tornadoes in terms anyone can understand. The subject is fascinating as he writes it. The growth of knowledge, and the way that growth comes about is exciting and tragic at the same time. When the investigations turn to storm-chasing, the reader learns just how important this scientific information-gathering becomes, not just another daredevil stunt among adventure seekers.

    I found the information on Dr. Fujita's methods and discoveries to be well explained and the ignorance of the official weather prognosticators in their cocooned refusal to accept his discoveries almost inevitable, yet unacceptable and disastrous. Neither pilots nor airport control staff were made aware of impending tornadoes, or "microbursts" (explained in the book) until very recently, a ruling referred to by Mike Smith as "bureaucratic myopia". This is nonfiction, but gave me the shivers in the same way as a fiction thriller would, especially reading of a very close call that was averted not by a weather warning, but because of a power outage at the airport just prior to a landing, causing the pilot to abort the landing.

    Did you ever wonder how the newspapers got their weathermaps so up-to-date? Did you ever wonder how Doppler Radar came into being and how it works? These are questions I'd asked myself through the years and they are covered in this impressive book. This is not a large book, nor do you have to be a meteorologist or savant to read it. Nor does it deal exclusively with tornadoes. It is all written in simple language. There are a number of photos in the book. While this book deals mostly with the US, it is of global significance.

    Not surprisingly, the most critical event in the book is Hurricane Katrina. We learn what can go wrong with the forecasts' timely releases, what did go wrong and why, and how the meteorologists tried to get the evacuation process going while there was still time. The survivors were literally 'hung out to dry'. How many more could have survived if it weren't for the bureaucratic non-action? If bureaucracy hadn't fumbled the ball, the meteorological scientists would have netted it.

    This is a fascinating book, full of suspense, telling it like it is, and a great learning experience without realizing just how much of what you read will stay with you. I highly recommend this book. One last tornado is included: Greensburg, a town that disappeared, but has risen again. As an added bonus, this book is interactive. There are symbols scattered throughout which direct readers to a website where they can find videos, related information, and more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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