Wars of National Liberation

Overview

The impact of World War II opened the door for weak and impoverished nations to develop military means of defeating modern armies. In China, Korea, Vietnam, Palestine, Cuba, Ireland, Africa, and the former Soviet Union, where battles still rage today-indeed, all over the globe-impassioned revolutions, marked by irregular warfare, guerilla insurgency, and terrorism, turned nations upside down in the name of liberation. Vividly illustrated and packed with punch, this dynamic account of endemic violence, epic ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (28) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.99   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$3.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(3153)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2006 Paperback New -May have label on cover and remainder mark.

Ships from: San Jose, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$5.92
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(10997)

Condition: New
1899-12-30 New 0060891645 NEW/UNREAD! ! ! Tracking is not available for orders shipped outside of the United States. If you would like to track your domestic order please be ... sure to select the Priority/Expedited Shipping option. Read more Show Less

Ships from: McKeesport, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(50)

Condition: New
New York 2006 Trade Paperback in color-photo wraps. No edition stated, assumed 1st printing. New, remainder stripe on lower edge. (Smithsonian History of Warfare) Details the ... little wars of our time. Mint new copy. 5-1/4 x 7-3/4, 256 pp, index, biographical notes, b/w & color photos & illus. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Nevada City, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$30.50
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(357)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(229)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$86.18
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(210)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The impact of World War II opened the door for weak and impoverished nations to develop military means of defeating modern armies. In China, Korea, Vietnam, Palestine, Cuba, Ireland, Africa, and the former Soviet Union, where battles still rage today-indeed, all over the globe-impassioned revolutions, marked by irregular warfare, guerilla insurgency, and terrorism, turned nations upside down in the name of liberation. Vividly illustrated and packed with punch, this dynamic account of endemic violence, epic character, and astonishingly resourceful commanders and combatants probes the nation in arms as a product of the Western presence, and of communism, religion, and tribal or familial loyalties. A chronology and biographies of crucial figures clarifies the lines leading backward to the prewar era.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060891640
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/2/2006
  • Series: Smithsonian History of Warfare Series
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Moran is a professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He has lectured and written widely, translated the writings of Carl von Clausewitz, and edited The People in Arms.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Wars of National Liberation (Smithsonian History of Warfare)


By Daniel Moran

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Daniel Moran
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060891645

Chapter One

China

In an epoch in which imperialism exists, a genuine people's revolution cannot win victory in any country without help from the international revolutionary forces.

Mao Tse-tung, speech of 30 June 1949

The war that brought the Chinese Communists to power in 1949 was the culmination of a series of conflicts that followed the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1912, an event that had previously claimed the title 'Chinese revolution'. A pseudo-republican regime followed, under the presidency of military strongman Yuan Shikai, whose Paiyang Army was the most modern fighting force in a country that had been teetering towards civil war since the turn of the century. Yuan's death in 1916 gave rise to a renewed contest for power, which this time produced no clear winner. By 1919 China had ceased, for practical purposes, to be a unified country, having fallen under the sway of provincial 'warlords' whose intramural quarrels dominated the 1920s. The warlords would in turn be suppressed by the Kuomintang (KMT), a nationalist party whose leading figure, Sun Yat-sen, served briefly as China's provisional president before being ousted by Yuan. The KMT's efforts were supported for a time by theChinese Communist Party (CCP), founded in 1921 as an outpost of Lenin's Third International, and also directly by the new Soviet Union, which recognized the revolutionary opportunity that China's decrepitude afforded, and also that the expulsion of Western influence from Asia was in its interest. Both the KMT and the CCP were revolutionary and anti-imperialist movements intent upon governing a unified China, and this shared aspiration made co-operation against common enemies possible -- first the warlords and later the Japanese. Once the latter had been beaten, however, a final showdown became unavoidable. At the end the Communists controlled all of China except Taiwan, to which the KMT retired once its position on the mainland had become hopeless.

The roots of this complex struggle can be traced to the entanglement of the two main protagonists in the 1920s. Between them, the Kuomintang was by far the stronger, being descended from a long line of reformist and anti-Western associations extending back to the 1890s. Such sentiments were amplified by the First World War. Japan, bound to the Entente by virtue of its 1902 alliance with Great Britain, seized Germany's holdings around Shandong, and sought to use this foothold to extract concessions not unlike those that had brought war with China twenty years before. No Western power was prepared to restrain Japan, even after China entered the war at America's behest. At the same time, the war reduced Western economic activity in China, which afforded new scope for native commercial and social initiatives. A movement of modernizing cultural criticism arose, based upon Western ideas of democratic individualism and scientific learning, and directed simultaneously against traditional Confucian practices, persisting Western influence and the encroaching Japanese. It acquired a name -- the May Fourth Movement -- following a violent mass protest against the terms of the Versailles Treaty, by which Japan would be allowed to retain the former German leaseholds it had seized during the war.

The May Fourth Movement created an atmosphere that favoured the KMT's programme of national regeneration. It also provided the early leadership for the Chinese Communist Party, whose growth was made easier by Western complacency. While the victors of 1918 were eager to reassert their rights under the 'unequal treaties' negotiated in the nineteenth century, Lenin's government declared itself willing to renounce the concessions won by the tsars at China's expense -- a reflection of weakness rather than generosity, but symbolically impressive just the same. The Comintern agents sent to China in the spring of 1920 received a cordial welcome, both from activists drawn to communism as such, and from the KMT leadership. When early efforts to create an independent communist movement based on factory workers and the railway unions faltered, the CCP's focus shifted to infiltrating its revolutionary rival. Sun, who did not foresee that the rivalry would one day prove mortal, accepted communists into the KMT as individual members. He also relied on Soviet advice in reorganizing the KMT's party structure, and in consolidating its authority in Guangdong, a province remote from the centres of power, on China's southern coast.

China, like France, is a country best conquered from the north. It was from there that the Manchus had come in the seventeenth century, and it was also there, and around Shanghai, that the most serious local wars occurred in the 1920s. It is not possible here even to summarize the course of these clashes, which can be conceived as something like a round robin tournament, in which weaker contestants were absorbed by the increasingly exhausted winners. Sun, dependent at first upon the mercenary armies of southern warlords, dreamt of a Northern Expedition to cut the Gordian knot of provincial militarism, but did not live to see it. That task would fall to his protege, Chiang Kai-shek, who assumed effective leadership of the Kuomintang following Sun's death in March 1925.

Chiang was a military man. In contrast to Sun, whose personal outlook had drifted to the left during his years of reliance upon the Soviet Union, Chiang was wary of communists within the KMT. He was also determined to employ his well-trained, Soviet-style forces to some useful purpose. Events favoured him. On 30 May 1925, a demonstration in Shanghai, called to protest the killing of a Chinese worker by a Japanese factory guard, broke down in bloody violence after British police fired into a crowd that seemed about to rush their station. Such scenes were scarcely unprecedented in China, or for that matter in Shanghai. This time, however, the usual waves of civil unrest that followed failed to subside -- testimony to the general weakening of the social fabric wrought by the internecine struggles of the last five years. By mid summer, boycotts, strikes and assorted mayhem -- collectively remembered as the May Thirtieth Movement -- had spread throughout . . .

Continues...


Excerpted from Wars of National Liberation (Smithsonian History of Warfare) by Daniel Moran Copyright © 2006 by Daniel Moran. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)