Warthogs Paint: A Messy Color Book

Warthogs Paint: A Messy Color Book

by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Henry Cole, Henry Cole
     
 

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When some warthogs find themselves stuck inside on a rainy day, they decide to paint - first red, then yellow, then blue, they mix their colors and cover the walls (and themselves) with fun. Preschoolers will learn about primary colors and how they mix to make secondary colors in this messy companion to Warthogs in the Kitchen: A Sloppy Counting

Overview

When some warthogs find themselves stuck inside on a rainy day, they decide to paint - first red, then yellow, then blue, they mix their colors and cover the walls (and themselves) with fun. Preschoolers will learn about primary colors and how they mix to make secondary colors in this messy companion to Warthogs in the Kitchen: A Sloppy Counting Book.

About the Author:

Pamela Duncan Edwards has written numerous picture books, and Henry Cole has painted a lot of pictures (but he tries to be neater than a warthog). They are the creators of Dinorella: A Prehistoric Fairy Tale; The Wacky Wedding: A Book of Alphabet Antics; Ed & Fred Flea; Honk!: The Story of a Prima Swanerina; and, of course, Warthogs in the Kitchen: A Sloppy Counting Book. They both live in the Washington, D.C. area.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
What do warthogs do when rain prevents them from going outside to play? In this rhyming picture book the furry creatures try their hand at painting, with results that are educational and fun. The warthogs paint the walls of their house in various colors, and the words in the text match the respective hues. When primary colors are mixed to form new colors, young readers will remember the combinations. The goofy warthogs are too cute to resist. Included at the end is a learning page that is loaded with fun facts about colors. 2001, Hyperion, $14.99. Ages 3 to 5. Reviewer: Christopher Moning
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-The exuberant stars of Warthogs in the Kitchen (Hyperion, 1998) return for more messy fun as they look for something to do on a rainy day. Armed with brushes and dripping cans of yellow, blue, and red paint, they head for the kitchen, intending to decorate a blank white wall. However, their clumsiness soon gets the best of them, and paint is spilled all over the floor. The artists watch excitedly as the three primary colors are accidentally mixed together to create green, orange, and purple, which they enthusiastically add to their masterpiece. At the end of the day, they sit back and admire the colorful rainbow that they have created. Although the rhymes are sometimes a bit forced, the rhythmic text keeps the story moving right along. Done in pen, colored pencils, and watercolors, the artwork is lighthearted and appealing. With their turned-up tusks and bristly brown fur, these creatures are appropriately bumbling and comical. Clean white backgrounds focus the eyes on the action and will help children keep the various color combinations straight. The names of the different colors appear in that color in the text, which also gets the message across. Purchase this if you are looking to supplement standbys such as Ellen Stoll Walsh's Mouse Paint (Harcourt, 1989).-Joy Fleishhacker, formerly at School Library Journal Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This popular team's warthogs return, fresh from their sloppy kitchen counting experience (Warthogs in the Kitchen), to make a fun mess with buckets of paint. It is raining and the warthogs have decided to paint the wall. First the primaries are introduced: "All colors can be made, I've heard it said, / As long as we have some yellow, blue, and red." (The color words sport the actual color.) They paint great swipes of color on the wall and then get down to their specialty, making a real fiasco, but with enough control to the mayhem to produce orange, green, and purple. "What a terrible mess! But see, it's clear: / Mixing blue and yellow makes green appear"—in great pools on the floor, which are transferred to the wall. All said and done, a rainbow materializes on the wall. A little color quiz concludes the story. It's not Margaret Wise Brown's Color Kittens—there is little of the magic of color here, it's all process, and the verse is far from transporting—but it is a solid, slapstick introduction to color, plus utterly inspirational when it comes to making a rainy day bright.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786804702
Publisher:
Hyperion Books for Children
Publication date:
07/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.74(w) x 11.24(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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