Wash-a-Bye Bear
  • Wash-a-Bye Bear
  • Wash-a-Bye Bear

Wash-a-Bye Bear

by Thomas Docherty
     
 

Flora loves Bear just the way he is . . . so what will she do when he emerges all clean from the washing machine?

Flora loves her Bear dearly, but her mom says it’s time for him to go in the wash. Beautifully imagined scenes show Bear, in the wash, remembering how much fun they had getting grubby in the first place. When Bear is clean, he’s

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Overview

Flora loves Bear just the way he is . . . so what will she do when he emerges all clean from the washing machine?

Flora loves her Bear dearly, but her mom says it’s time for him to go in the wash. Beautifully imagined scenes show Bear, in the wash, remembering how much fun they had getting grubby in the first place. When Bear is clean, he’s just not the same, so Flora sets out to have some fun and get him back to his dirty but loveable self again. Then, at the end of a long day, it’s Flora’s turn to have a wash — and good old Bear still loves clean Flora just the same.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
Flora's mommy says Bear needs a bath because he is stinky and dirty. Into the washing machine he goes with a load of socks. Flora sits in front of the machine and tells Bear to be brave. The water and soap, helped by the machine's swishing, clean off soggy food smears, like breakfast milk and ice cream. Soon Bear is cleaned of beach sand and birthday cake, not to mention sticky sweets. Away go mud stains and leaf gunk. No more glue and paint on paws. Marker scribbles vanish with the soap and finally Bear is clean, though a little dizzy. When he is dry, Flora holds him again, but he does not feel or smell like Bear. That is all right. Flora plays in the mud with him and paints with him and eats with him. In the end, he looks and smells just the way he did before his bath. Now Mommy says Flora needs a bath. She worries that Bear will not love her when she is clean, but Mommy says he will love Flora forever and ever. Children will relate to the love Flora feels for her stuffed animal. The illustrations are grand, especially Bear's expressions. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—When Bear gets too sticky, glittery, sandy, dirty, and stinky, it's off to the washing machine for him. "Be brave, Bear!" Flora tells him. As he spins around (with all the dirty socks), the child remembers all the good times that got him so dirty. These escapades are recounted in rhyming italic text-breakfast smears, melted ice-cream tears, sticky sweets, winter showers, marker scribbles, and much more. The illustrations in this section mimic the front of a washing machine. They are a perfect circle with the text on suds placed at the top and bottom of the page with socks floating at the edge of the scenes to reinforce the effect. When Bear is finally clean and dry, he no longer looks, smells, tastes, or feels like he should to sad Flora, so she spends the rest of the day doing things with Bear (again recounted in rhyming italic text)-teatime fun, backyard games, and art projects-that will make him himself again. When it's time for Flora to have her bath, she wonders if Bear will still love her when she's all washed and clean, which, of course, he does. Docherty breathes new life into a familiar tale via fun-to-read text with clever placement, homey illustrations with ingenious design, and an overall feeling of love and warmth. Pair it with Helen Oxenbury's Tom and Pippo and the Washing Machine (S & S, 1988) for a super clean storytime.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
Kirkus Reviews
A paean to filthy, sticky, beloved stuffed animals everywhere. Flora and Bear are nearly inseparable, but then comes a dire transformation. "I love you, Bear," she explains. "But Mommy says you are smelly and full of stains and you need a wash." As he spins in the washer with faithful Flora seated outside, every stain conjures a memory, whether of hiding in fallen leaves or snacking on jam toast. The washing done, Flora finds that Bear no longer looks, smells, tastes or even feels like himself. It is a problem remedied by some additional play. When the child worries that Bear will no longer love her after she is washed and clean, her mother reassures her that he always will. Winning watercolors nicely set memories within a circular washing-machine-window–shaped frame. As for the characters themselves, Bear is subtly expressive and Flora an admirably active young woman. While not every rhyme in the text is perfect ("trees" with "leaves", "games" with "stains"), readers will have so much fun playing along with the two friends they'll hardly notice. The endpapers depicting Bear engaged in every activity, from sticking his paws in yogurt cups to finding himself belly-down in puddles of paint, drill home the fun to be had with a stuffed little friend. Muck and mess make good, clean fun. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763664862
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
05/14/2013
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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