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Washington from the Ground Up
     

Washington from the Ground Up

by James H. S. McGregor
 

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At the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers, President Washington chose a diamond-shaped site for the city that would bear his name, along with the burdens and blessings of democracy. Situated midway between North and South, the capital was also a gateway to the West—a contested wilderness where rough frontiersmen were already carving a divided

Overview

At the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers, President Washington chose a diamond-shaped site for the city that would bear his name, along with the burdens and blessings of democracy. Situated midway between North and South, the capital was also a gateway to the West—a contested wilderness where rough frontiersmen were already carving a divided nation.

With Indians on their borders and black slaves in their midst, the country's white founders struggled to embody, in bricks and stone, the paradoxical republic they had invented. Inspired by Greek and Roman models, city planners and designers scoured the Western world—from Hadrian's Pantheon to Palladio's Vicenza to the French Royal Academy—for an architectural language to capture the elusive principles of liberty, equality, and union.

Washington from the Ground Up tells the story of a nation whose Enlightenment ideals were tested in the fires of rebellion, removal, and resistance. It is also a tale of two cities: official Washington, whose stately neoclassical buildings expressed the government's power and global reach; and DC, whose minority communities, especially African Americans, lived in the shadows of poverty. Moving chronologically and geographically throughout the District, James McGregor reads this complex history from monuments and museums, libraries and churches, squares and neighborhoods that can still be seen today. His lucid narrative, accompanied by detailed maps and copious illustrations, doubles as a visitor's guide to this uniquely American city.

Editorial Reviews

Booklist

McGregor's story of our nation's capitol begins with George Washington's selection of the site in 1790 and then proceeds to chronicle the history of the federal city's construction. He discusses the competition to design the executive mansion, what he calls the burgeoning bureaucracy, and the creation of 130 acres for the president's grounds; the city's public walks and the development of its prestigious neighborhoods are also part of his purview...Also brought into the profile are the city's many libraries, churches, monuments, and museums; McGregor tells how they relate to the capitol's history. A solid, thoroughly researched book.
George Cohen

Chicago Tribune

For visitors to the White House, the Congress, the Senate, the Library of Congress, the National Mall and scores of other federal buildings, institutions and attractions, this guide brings to life the architecture of the capital, placing each piece in a historical perspective that is national in scope. The writing, crisp and direct, is enlivened with anecdotes about our rulers and their often unruly subjects who made history in these same buildings.
J. D. Brown and Margaret Backenheimer

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674026049
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
10/15/2007
Series:
From the Ground Up Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

James H. S. McGregor is Professor and Head of the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Georgia.

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