Washington Goes to War by David Brinkley, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Washington Goes to War

Washington Goes to War

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by David Brinkley
     
 

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"Astonishing. . . Told with endearing detail . . . He knows his Washington well."
—The New York Times Book Review
"HILARIOUS AND INSTRUCTIVE . . . Brinkley has written an impressionist history, comparable to a pointillist painting composed of small points of color that, seen whole, comprise a remarkably truthful record of reality."
—George F.

Overview

"Astonishing. . . Told with endearing detail . . . He knows his Washington well."
—The New York Times Book Review
"HILARIOUS AND INSTRUCTIVE . . . Brinkley has written an impressionist history, comparable to a pointillist painting composed of small points of color that, seen whole, comprise a remarkably truthful record of reality."
—George F. Will
The Washington Post
Today the hub of international affairs and government, Washington, D.C. was once little more than a sleepy, early-to-bed Southern town that happened to host our nationally elected officials. Esteemed, award-winning journalist David Brinkley remembers well what it was like—how Washington awoke from its slumber and found itself with World War II on its hands. It was left to Washington to print the paper, alphabetize the bureaucracies, host the parties, pitch the propaganda, write the laws, launch the drives, draft the boys, hire the "government girls," and engage in an often hilarious administrative war of words, wit, and even some wisdom.
"EVOCATIVE . . . One gets the sense that he was everywhere in Washington, with a bird's-eye view of the show from start to finish. . . . A grand and moving drama."
—Christopher Lehmann-Haupt
The New York Times

"A wonderful read for those of us who lived through it. It should be even better for those who are too young to remember."
—The Washington Monthly

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The city ``boasted'' 15,000 privies; you could walk through the White House gate without being questioned; the Army chief of staff, early in the war, at least, sent a handwritten note to the family of every serviceman killed in battle. Things were quite different in the WW II capital, and Brinkley (a radio reporter in Washington at the time) reveals the tempo of the town in a series of vivid character sketches and anecdotes connected by commentary both illuminating and entertaining. Among the wide variety of subjects dealt with: the bulging civilian and military bureaucracies; the housing crisis in a city ``crowded to suffocation''; the pressures on black Washingtonians; the frivolousness of the town's high society (President Roosevelt publicly called them parasites); the effect on the citizenry of hordes of thrill-seeking servicemen in a city without much entertainment to offer them; the emotional wranglings of the wartime Congress; the thorny yet genial relationship between FDR and the press. This is a valuable record of a town and government coping with global responsibilities for which it was ill prepared. Photos. 175,000 first printing; BOMC main selection. (April)
Christopher Lehmann-Haupt
Evocative�One gets the sense that he was everywhere in Washington, with a bird's—eye view of the show from start to finish�.A grand and moving drama.
The New York Times
George Will
Hilarious and instructive�Brinkley has written an impressionist history, comparable to a pointillist painting composed of small points of color that, seem whole, comprise a remarkably truthful record of reality.
The Washington Post

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345359797
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/14/1989
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
4.22(w) x 6.84(h) x 0.90(d)

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Washington Goes to War 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago