Washington Square Serenade [Bonus DVD]

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
New York City has long been more than America's biggest and most fabled city -- it's a place that symbolizes fresh starts and new opportunities, and there are scores of songs and stories about folks pulling up roots and heading to the Big Apple in search of a better and more exciting life. Steve Earle wrote one such song on his 1997 album El Corazón, "NYC," in which a nervy kid from Tennessee hitchhikes to Manhattan because "there must be something happening, it's just too big a town," and a decade later Earle followed him, moving to New York to escape Red State malaise. Washington Square Serenade, Earle's 12th studio album and first in three years, deals in part with the ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
New York City has long been more than America's biggest and most fabled city -- it's a place that symbolizes fresh starts and new opportunities, and there are scores of songs and stories about folks pulling up roots and heading to the Big Apple in search of a better and more exciting life. Steve Earle wrote one such song on his 1997 album El Corazón, "NYC," in which a nervy kid from Tennessee hitchhikes to Manhattan because "there must be something happening, it's just too big a town," and a decade later Earle followed him, moving to New York to escape Red State malaise. Washington Square Serenade, Earle's 12th studio album and first in three years, deals in part with the sights and sounds of his new hometown, from the red-tailed hawk that lives in Central Park "Down Here Below" to the multilingual chatter of the streets "City of Immigrants", while also taking a look back at the home he left behind on tunes like "Oxycontin Blues," "Red Is the Color," and "Jericho Road." While there's a strength in the familiar textures of the songs where Earle remembers Tennessee, there's a welcome sense of rejuvenation in the album's first half as he shares the details of his adventures in New York which also includes a new bride, Allison Moorer, who lends lovely backing vocals to these sessions and is the presumable inspiration for "Sparkle and Shine" and "Days Aren't Long Enough", and the expressionistic imagery of "Down Here Below" and "Satellite Radio" works beautifully in this context. After producing his last few album himself, Earle turned those chores over to Dust Brother John King for Washington Square Serenade, and King brings a welcome collision of the traditional and the contemporary to the music, facing scratchy drum loops against mandolins and dobros while letting a folky simplicity carry the day when it best suits the song, and the sound is crisp and forceful throughout. Washington Square Serenade ultimately sounds a bit less focused than its immediate predecessors, the politically minded Jerusalem and The Revolution Starts...Now despite the presence of "Red Is the Color" and "Steve's Hammer", but it also finds Earle trying out some new tricks both as a performer and a songwriter, and it's exciting and encouraging to hear him exploring fresh turf after two decades of record-making, and there's lots of fine music to be had on this set.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/25/2007
  • Label: New West Records
  • UPC: 607396613120
  • Catalog Number: 6131
  • Sales rank: 316,413

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Tennessee Blues (2:39)
  2. 2 Down Here Below (4:02)
  3. 3 Satellite Radio (4:09)
  4. 4 City of Immigrants - Forro in the Dark (4:18)
  5. 5 Sparkle and Shine (3:12)
  6. 6 Come Home to Me (3:47)
  7. 7 Jericho Road (3:36)
  8. 8 Oxycontin Blues (2:54)
  9. 9 Red Is the Color (4:19)
  10. 10 Steve's Hammer (For Pete) (3:15)
  11. 11 Days Aren't Long Enough - Allison Moorer (3:01)
  12. 12 Way Down in the Hole (2:55)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Intro
  2. 2 Tennessee Blues
  3. 3 Greenwich Village
  4. 4 Gaslight Café
  5. 5 Matt Umanov Guitars
  6. 6 City of Immigrants - Allison Moorer
  7. 7 Washington Square Park
  8. 8 Days Aren't Long Enough - Allison Moorer
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Steve Earle Primary Artist, Banjo, Bouzouki, Guitar, Harmonica, Mandolin, Harmonium, Vocals, Tamboura
Marty Beller Drums
John Medeski Organ, Harmonium, Electric Piano, Mellotron
Smokey Hormel Guitar (Baritone)
John King Choir, Chorus
Mauro Refosco Zabumba
Allison Moorer Vocals
Davi Vieira Triangle, Timba
Patrick Earle Percussion, Choir, Chorus
Josh Wilbur Choir, Chorus
Jeremy Chatzky Electric Bass, Acoustic Bass
Jorge Continentino Bamboo Flute
John Spiker Electric Bass
Charlie Stavish Choir, Chorus
Paul Bannister Choir, Chorus
Downtown Proletariat Choir Track Performer
Collin Hart Choir, Chorus
Technical Credits
Ray Kennedy Digital Editing
Steve Earle Composer, Author
Tom Waits Composer
Andrew Clark Programming
Jim DeMain Mastering
Anthony DeCurtis Liner Notes
John King Producer
Allison Moorer Composer, Duet
Patrick Earle Logistics
Josh Wilbur Engineer
Tony Fitzpatrick Cover Art
Tom Camuso Engineer
John Spiker Programming
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