The Waste Land [NOOK Book]

Overview

According to Wikipedia, "The Waste Land is a 434-line Modernist poem by T. S. Eliot published in 1922. It has been called "one of the most important poems of the 20th century." Despite the poem's obscurity-its shifts between satire and prophecy, its abrupt and unannounced changes of speaker, location and time, its elegiac but intimidating summoning up of a vast and dissonant range of cultures and literatures-the poem has become a familiar touchstone of modern literature. Among its famous phrases are "April is the...
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The Waste Land

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Overview

According to Wikipedia, "The Waste Land is a 434-line Modernist poem by T. S. Eliot published in 1922. It has been called "one of the most important poems of the 20th century." Despite the poem's obscurity-its shifts between satire and prophecy, its abrupt and unannounced changes of speaker, location and time, its elegiac but intimidating summoning up of a vast and dissonant range of cultures and literatures-the poem has become a familiar touchstone of modern literature. Among its famous phrases are "April is the cruellest month" (its first line); "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"; and (its last line) the mantra in the Sanskrit language "Shantih shantih shantih." Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965) was an American-born English poet, playwright, and literary critic, arguably the most important English-language poet of the 20th century. The poem that made his name, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock started in 1910 and published in Chicago in 1915-is regarded as a masterpiece of the modernist movement. He followed this with what have become some of the best-known poems in the English language, including Gerontion (1920), The Waste Land (1922), The Hollow Men (1925), Ash Wednesday (1930), and Four Quartets (1945). He is also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948."
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Written when Eliot was working as a bank clerk and heavily edited by his friend Ezra Pound, 1922's The Waste Land could probably take the prize as the most important English-language poem of the 20th century. This 75th-anniversary edition includes the full text plus notes and an afterword by scholar/editor Christopher Ricks.
Booknews
Prints the first American edition (Boni & Liveright) of Eliot's most important work, accompanied by the editor's detailed annotations. Eliot's own notoriously inscrutable notes, placed at the end, are also annotated. The abundant explanatory material includes background on the poem's sources, composition, and publication history as well as 25 critical reviews and essays. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Times Literary Supplement
“We know of no other modern poet who can more adequately and movingly reveal to us the inextricable tangle of the sordid and the beautiful that make up life.”
Conrad Aiken
The Waste Land is unquestionably important, unquestionably brilliant…The poem must be taken—most invitingly offers itself—as a brilliant and kaleidoscopic confusion; as a series of sharp, discrete, slightly related perceptions and feelings, dramatically and lyrically presented, and violently juxtaposed…It shimmers, it suggests, it gives the desired strangeness…One of the most moving and original poems of our time.”
F. R. Leavis
“[An achievement] of the first importance for English poetry. In it a mind fully alive in the age compels a poetic triumph.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781412183918
  • Publisher: eBooksLib
  • Publication date: 4/21/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 95 KB

Meet the Author

When T. S. Eliot died, wrote Robert Giroux, "the world became a lesser place." Certainly the most imposing poet of his time, Eliot was revered by Igor Stravinsky "not only as a great sorcerer of words but as the very key keeper of the language." For Alfred Kazin he was "themana known as 'T. S. Eliot,' the model poet of our time, the most cited poet and incarnation of literary correctness in the English-speaking world." Northrop Frye simply states: "A thorough knowledge of Eliot is compulsory for anyone interested in contemporary literature. Whether he is liked or disliked is of no importance, but he must be read."

In 1945 Eliot wrote: "A poet must take as his material his own language as it is actually spoken around him." Correlatively, the duty of the poet, as Eliot emphasized in a 1943 lecture, "is only indirectly to the people: his direct duty is to his language, first to preserve, and second to extend and improve." (TPF)

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Table of Contents


Introduction     7
Biographical Sketch     14
The Story Behind the Story     19
List of Characters     22
Summary and Analysis     26
Critical Views     53
Eleanor Cook on Maps of The Waste Land     53
Louis Menand on Nineteenth Century Style     57
Sandra M. Gilbert on Eliot's Mourning of a Friend     68
Michael Levenson on Eliot's Views of Postwar London     74
Juan A. Suarez on the Meaning of the Gramophone     85
Shawn R. Tucker on Anxiety in The Waste Land     89
Thomas Dilworth on Sex Between the Typist and the Young Man     94
Camelia Elias and Bent Soerensen on the Influence of Ovid     97
Works by T.S. Eliot     101
Annotated Bibliography     103
Contributors     105
Acknowledgments     108
Index     110
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2015

    The Waste Land by T. S. Elliot is a poem that makes the reader s

    The Waste Land by T. S. Elliot is a poem that makes the reader see the dark and commonly over looked reality of life and death. The poem focuses on the fragile mental state of many people during the post World War One time period. Elliot shows his view that society had become wounded and altered through the multiple accounts of painful memories, social hardships, abuse, and more told by multiple narrators. All these experiences combined created a society in which people were questioning whether or not they had the strength to keep on living, relationships were broken and many people couldn’t effectively communicate or resolve issues together. The poem gives the characters a sense of hollowness and lack of emotions, the people act more like animals than humans because of their inability to feel or cope with emotions.
    Elliot’s poem was created with the intention to make society aware of the overlooked issue and recognize the need for a change. The writing style of the poem confuses the reader and requires thought to interpret because he was mimicking the confusion and chaos of the real world. Elliot also shows the world to be a barren wasteland. He doesn’t talk about new life in a positive way, he only shows how society runs from the idea of it and rather hides in “forgetful snow” and get joy out of feeding off “A little life with dried tubers.”
    The contrast between high and low society is also a message that Elliot wanted to show in his poem. Both higher and lower class people suffered in the aftermath of the war but expressed their pains in different ways. The higher-class people showed irritable and paranoid character traits and showed a lot of caring for little issues. The lower class people showed less caring for their physical state and showed little emoticon or caring about much of anything. The depression and disintegration of society affected everyone and lead to a damaged and unproductive world. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    Don't buy this version

    The editorial review refers to a different version of this poem, with annotatios and an afterward. This version is just the poem, which you can get for free.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    HP Who?

    Whoever is selling this doesn't even know who authored it. This has nothing to do with HP Lovecraft. Don't buy from this seller.

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  • Posted December 11, 2012

    A timeless classic!

    This used to be required reading for all educated individuals, and it should be required again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

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    Posted January 11, 2014

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    Posted February 6, 2015

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    Posted April 10, 2012

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    Posted January 10, 2015

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    Posted August 19, 2011

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