The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic

The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic

by Allan Wolf
     
 

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Arrogance and innocence, hubris and hope—twenty-four haunting voices of the Titanic tragedy, as well as the iceberg itself, are evoked in a stunning tour de force.

Millionaire John Jacob Astor hopes to bring home his pregnant teen bride with a minimum of media scandal. A beautiful Lebanese refugee, on her way to family in Florida, discovers the first

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Overview

Arrogance and innocence, hubris and hope—twenty-four haunting voices of the Titanic tragedy, as well as the iceberg itself, are evoked in a stunning tour de force.

Millionaire John Jacob Astor hopes to bring home his pregnant teen bride with a minimum of media scandal. A beautiful Lebanese refugee, on her way to family in Florida, discovers the first stirrings of love. And an ancient iceberg glides south, anticipating its fateful encounter. The voices in this remarkable re-creation of the Titanic disaster span classes and stations, from Margaret ("the unsinkable Molly") Brown to the captain who went down with his ship; from the lookout and wireless men to a young boy in search of dragons and a gambler in search of marks. Slipping in telegraphs, undertaker's reports, and other records, poet Allan Wolf offers a breathtaking, intimate glimpse at the lives behind the tragedy, told with clear-eyed compassion and astounding emotional power.

Extensive back matter includes:

Author's note
Morse code with messages to decipher
Titanic miscellany
Bibliography, articles, periodicals, government documents, discography

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Wolf (Zane's Trace) constructs a richly textured novel in verse that recreates the Titanic's ill-fated journey, predominantly through the voices of her passengers. The speakers include John Jacob Astor, ("the unsinkable") Margaret Brown, Captain E.J. Smith, and little-known individuals whose stories Wolf draws from research and archival materials. A Lebanese refugee, traveling alone with her brother, finds first love; a tailor, accompanied by his two sons, anguishes over his broken marriage; and a gambler cons his way through the first-class passengers' pocketbooks. A ship rat speaks, as does the iceberg itself-a choice that could have become esoteric ("I am the ice. I have no need of wings./ I only need the hearts Titanic brings")-but earns its place within a composite that includes colloquial speech, introspective interior monologues, and rhyming poetry. Throughout, sequences flash forward to an undertaker's handling of the bodies ("Bodies scattered for miles, in every direction./ Bodies as far as my indifferent eyes can see"), assuring that the ending is never in question. But Wolf's carefully crafted characters evolve as the voyage slides to its icy conclusion; readers may be surprised by the potency of the final impact. Ages 14-up.
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From the Publisher
A masterpiece. Wolf leaves no emotion unplumbed, no area of research uninvestigated, and his voices are so authentic they hurt. Everyone should read it.
—Booklist (starred review)

Wolf constructs a richly textured novel in verse that recreates the Titanic's ill-fated journey, predominantly through the voices of her passengers... Wolf's carefully crafted characters evolve as the voyage slides to its icy conclusion; readers may be surprised by the potency of the final impact.
—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Twenty-four voices-of passengers, rats and even the iceberg-evoke the human tragedy of the ill-fated voyage. Wolf brings the history and, more importantly, the human scale of the event to life by giving voice to the players themselves . . . A lyrical, monumental work of fact and imagination that reads like an oral history revved up by the drama of the event.
—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Wolf's novel in verse gives voice, through first-person accounts, to a cross section of passengers and crew on the Titanic: how they boarded, why they're there, and how they face the disaster. . . . The themes of natural disaster, technology, social class, survival, and death all play out here.
—The Horn Book (starred review)

Children's Literature - Ellen Welty
Twenty-four voices in verse chronicle the sole voyage of the Titanic. Even the iceberg and the ship's rat "speak" in these pages. The resulting record of the brief voyage gives readers an emotional punch. The strength of the effect is astonishing given that the ship sank nearly one hundred years ago and has been the stuff of legend ever since. Featured voices include those of well-known passengers such as John Jacob Astor and Margaret (the Unsinkable Molly) Brown, as well as those not so well known. Some of them perish, some of them survive, and all of them have stories to tell. The facts that are revealed by the narrative (e.g., there were only twenty lifeboats that would each hold forty people for a ship carrying over 2,000 passengers and crew) are stunning, and the voices range from the desperate to the complacent. Novels in verse are popular with young adults, and this one will not disappoint. Nice features include a list of the passengers, a list of facts about the famed ship, extensive references and biographical information about each of the voices. An author's note at the end describes Wolf's interpretation of some of the mysteries that still exist about the passengers. Very enthusiastically recommended. Reviewer: Ellen Welty
VOYA - Suanne Roush
On April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic hit an iceberg and sank. The tragedy of the "unsinkable" ship still fascinates nearly a century after it occurred. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, Wolf has recreated the story of the Titanic in verse form from the viewpoints of two dozen characters—from passengers of all classes and crew to the undertaker from Halifax, the iceberg, and a rat—and covers the time from the design and building of the ship through the aftermath of the sinking. The poems are no longer than two pages, and telegraph messages are interspersed throughout. Some of the most fascinating are those by the businessman who decided that the first-class passengers would rather have an unimpeded view than more lifeboats; Molly Brown, whose grit and determination helped save those in her lifeboat; and the undertaker who deals with the aftermath. Included in a notes section at the end are character notes on the people who tell the story, a list of passengers mentioned who were both lost and saved, Morse Code messages used in the narrative, miscellany, and an impressive bibliography including Internet sources and societies. That section alone should guarantee its inclusion in any collection, especially high school (where the resources could be used for research and the verse for English, history, or drama class presentations) and public libraries. Reviewer: Suanne Roush
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Talented poet, Allan Wolf, incorporates both accurate historical accounts and his own speculative research into his captivating novel in verse (Candlewick, 2011), an imagined account of the Titanic's ill fated voyage. With 24 personal narratives ranging in perspective from the ship's captain to a refugee in the third class to the iceberg itself, the story unfolds from preparations and boarding to evacuation attempts and the body collections by coroners. The ensemble narrators unfold another brilliant facet of this historical fiction gem, providing varied accents and nuances for each character. This phenomenal audio version of a stirring story should be part of all high school and public library collections.—Jessica Miller, West Springfield Public Library, MA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606316057
Publisher:
Demco Media
Publication date:
03/28/2013
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
466
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 8.80(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
A masterpiece. Wolf leaves no emotion unplumbed, no area of research uninvestigated, and his voices are so authentic they hurt. Everyone should read it.
—Booklist

Wolf constructs a richly textured novel in verse that recreates the Titanic's ill-fated journey, predominantly through the voices of her passengers... Wolf's carefully crafted characters evolve as the voyage slides to its icy conclusion; readers may be surprised by the potency of the final impact.
—Publishers Weekly

Twenty-four voices-of passengers, rats and even the iceberg-evoke the human tragedy of the ill-fated voyage. Wolf brings the history and, more importantly, the human scale of the event to life by giving voice to the players themselves . . . A lyrical, monumental work of fact and imagination that reads like an oral history revved up by the drama of the event.
—Kirkus Reviews

Wolf's novel in verse gives voice, through first-person accounts, to a cross section of passengers and crew on the Titanic: how they boarded, why they're there, and how they face the disaster. . . . The themes of natural disaster, technology, social class, survival, and death all play out here.
—The Horn Book

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