Water

Water

by Emily Neye
     
 

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Water is all around us. It is rain from the sky. It is a puddle on the ground. It is a place to swim. But that's not all. Water can change. Water can be ice cubes in your drink or steam from your bath.

Overview

Water is all around us. It is rain from the sky. It is a puddle on the ground. It is a place to swim. But that's not all. Water can change. Water can be ice cubes in your drink or steam from your bath.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Water really is an interesting substance. It takes on a variety of forms that we know, but as a young kid, may not really be aware of. The young girl in the opening scenes is enjoying water in the form of rain. She has her umbrella, rain gear, and boots; so sloshing through puddles is just great fun. Water, which makes up so much of our planet, offers great opportunities for recreation. Water is also essential to life. We need it to live, and we drink plenty each day. Water is also used for cooking and cleaning. Water can take another form when it gets cold. Instead of rain, we can have snow. Water can also freeze solid to form ice. With heat, it converts back to liquid and even vapor or steam. Eventually, the water absorbed in the air will come down again—most likely as rain. So, the cycle is complete, and the lesson easily learned in this "All Aboard Science Reader," Science Stop 1. 2002, Grosset & Dunlap/Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers,
— Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Neye leads beginning readers on an exploration of water in its many forms-rain, ice, snow, and steam-presenting the sources, uses, and properties of this precious resource in very basic terms. The text, one to three sentences per page, uses simple words, large type, word repetition, and picture clues that make this a wonderful introductory science book. Both the writing and the oil-pastel illustrations are well above average, with Revell's large-headed children enjoying water in all its forms. The exuberant pictures and an easy-to-decode text will entice even reluctant readers to give this selection a try.-Jean Lowery, Bishop Woods Elementary School, New Haven, CT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Water really is an interesting substance. It takes on a variety of forms that we know, but those that a young child, may not really be aware of. The young girl in the opening scenes is enjoying water in the form of rain. She has her umbrella, rain gear, and boots; so sloshing through puddles is just great fun. Water, which makes up so much of our planet, offers great opportunities for recreation. Water is also essential to life. We need it to live, and we drink plenty each day. Water is also used for cooking and cleaning. Water can take another form when it gets cold. Instead of rain, we can have snow. Water can also freeze solid to form ice. With heat, it converts back to liquid and even vapor or steam. Eventually, the water absorbed in the air will come down again—most likely as rain. So, the cycle is complete, and the lesson easily learned in this reissue which is now designed a Level 2 book in the "Penguin Young Readers" series. It has also been assigned Guided Reading Level "E." The author uses picture clues to help children figure out the words on a particular page and the pictures are full of action and happy kids. The opening page contains a note to parents and educators about the series and tips for making best use of the book. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101640883
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/16/2002
Series:
Penguin Young Readers Level 2 Series
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
48
File size:
20 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
6 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Emily Neye is a children’s book author and a landscape designer. She studied English at Amherst College and landscape architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. Emily loves learning about the natural world and sharing her passion with others, through both her writing and her work on urban gardens and parks. Emily lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and two daughters.

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