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Water, Ice & Stone: Science and Memory on the Antarctic Lakes
     

Water, Ice & Stone: Science and Memory on the Antarctic Lakes

by Bill Green
 

“Nature writing of a very high order . . . a joyride for those who enjoy deep explorations of logic, human frailty and the laws of nature.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“[Bill Green’s] prose rings with the elemental clarity of the ice he knows so well.”—PEN committee citation

A classic of contemporary nature writing,

Overview

“Nature writing of a very high order . . . a joyride for those who enjoy deep explorations of logic, human frailty and the laws of nature.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“[Bill Green’s] prose rings with the elemental clarity of the ice he knows so well.”—PEN committee citation

A classic of contemporary nature writing, this award-winning account of Antarctica is now available for the first time in paperback. A new introduction by the author emphasizes the ecological importance of the continent within the global warming crisis.

Bill Green is a professor of interdisciplinary studies at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He has been conducting research in Antarctica since 1968.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Each of the Antarctic lakes studied by geochemist Green is devoid of all but microscopic life. Nonetheless, in this ``minimalist's tableau,'' he finds a surprising wealth of scientific insight. The same can be said of this wonderful book. Ostensibly an account of a season in the field in Antarctica, it delivers so much more by exploring the nature of science in addition to portraying the rigors of research on the frozen continent. In evocative language, Green successfully moves between arresting natural history and sophisticated but accessible philosophy of science. Particularly satisfying is the discussion of how the author, his students and his colleagues came by their fascination with, and began their search for an understanding of, the natural world. With gripping accounts of a number of near-death experiences added to the mix, the whole is a thoroughly enjoyable and remarkably informative exposition of the life of a field scientist. (May)
Library Journal
Green, a physical and geochemist, has a research interest in limnology. As the title implies, his book includes a healthy dose of science, e.g., the physics of the structure of the water molecule in all states; day-to-day methods for scientific data collection; and reminiscences of Green's life with attempts to convey awe and appreciation of the beauty of the Antarctic. The most interesting is the process of the research project itself, but the jumps in text from Antarctica to Hawaii to Ohio, past and present, are distracting. Also, there is no index to go to a particular lake's study, no bibliography to identify his numerous quotations, no map to see where he was. Campbell's Crystal Desert: Summers in Antarctica (LJ 11/1/92), also written by a scientist on the Antarctic, had better cohesiveness and flow. For extensive collections on the Antarctic or natural history.-Jean E. Crampon, Hancock Biology & Oceanography Lib., Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles
School Library Journal

Green snagged the John Burroughs Medal in Nature Writing for this 1995 volume. In light of the growing global warming issue, this book, which unravels the geochemistry of Antarctica's lakes, could find a new audience. Includes a new preface by Green.


—Michael Rogers Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Booknews
A personal memoir and a fascinating scientific account of Green's seven field seasons spent studying the remote ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. Contains a map and several informative tables. No index, no bibliography. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934137086
Publisher:
Bellevue Literary Press
Publication date:
04/01/2008
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author


Bill Green made his first journey to Antarctica in 1968 to study the chemistry of the McMurdo Dry Valley lakes. He returns regularly to do research which has resulted in multiple articles on the biogeochemical processes at work in the primordial lakes of that continent. He is a professor of Interdisciplinary studies at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

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