Water

Water

by James G. Workman
     
 

Throughout evolution one vital element has determined where we live, how we live, and if we live. It used to be that only the poor suffered from thirst and hunger; the rest of us took taps and irrigated agriculture for granted. But now-due to booming populations, escalating demand and climate change-our most common life force is fast becoming uncommonly

Overview

Throughout evolution one vital element has determined where we live, how we live, and if we live. It used to be that only the poor suffered from thirst and hunger; the rest of us took taps and irrigated agriculture for granted. But now-due to booming populations, escalating demand and climate change-our most common life force is fast becoming uncommonly scarce.

Reservoirs evaporate. Aquifers sink to historic lows. Heatwaves desiccate arable land. Deserts encroach on sprawling cities. Scientists redefine seasonal dry spells as permanent droughts. In fifteen years the United Nations says two-thirds of the world's population will face water short-ages, with unsettling consequences for civilization. While natural threats like storms, earthquakes, fires and floods bring society together, water scarcity drives us apart. Can we adapt to the rule of water? This book shows where we can, how we should, and why we must.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Lynne Farrell Stover
Did you know that forest fires can be helpful, Denmark gets 20 percent of its power from wind, it can take two centuries for eroded soil to regenerate, and many Kenyans spend one third of their day fetching water? The four books in the Diminishing Resources series may be slim, but they are jam-packed with compelling information. Some of the content is so current it's almost prophetic. For example, the author of Soil describes how Haiti's environment is so depleted that an environmental disaster is probable. The author of Oil begins his book on the oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico as hurricanes Dennis and Katrina are approaching. What the author of Forests reveals about the 2009 wildfires in California and Greece is startling, and the author of Water anticipates that in fifteen years, two thirds of the world's population will be stressed due to the lack of fresh water. Though full of facts concerning man's flagrant exploitation of the environment, the book assures readers that all is not futile—conservation and innovation give us hope. The authors share their knowledge in a confident and conversational manner. With a focus on the historic, economic, political, and cultural issues of our declining resources, global ramifications and predictions of possible outcomes are addressed. These topical texts are so readable that one does not need to be involved in a research paper to find them fascinating. Each well-organized book boasts amazing illustrations, detailed source notes, Web sites of interest, a bibliography, and an index. Reviewer: Lynne Farrell Stover
Children's Literature - Lauri Berkenkamp
Fresh water is Earth's most precious natural resource, and one that is growing increasingly scarce. Workman's excellent book discusses our need for water, the reasons for the world's growing water shortage, the politics and business of water regulation, and new approaches to water conservation. The book is divided into five chapters, each focusing on a particular topic relevant to water as a limited natural resource. Through fascinating historical and modern-day examples of water management and mis-management, Workman provides an informative overview of the problems the entire world faces as our clean water supply grows ever more scarce. Sidebars scattered throughout the book provide a short but in-depth look at more specific aspects of the general topic presented in each chapter. The text is engaging and well written, and will be an ideal resource for students interested in researching the topic of water conservation. This is a valuable and timely resource for school and public libraries, as well. Young adult readers will find this most useful and interesting; younger readers may have difficulty with the elevated vocabulary and sentence length. The book includes an extensive list of resources used, listed by page and divided by chapter; bibliography; websites; and complete index. Reviewer: Lauri Berkenkamp
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up–This highly readable series provides a unique viewpoint on the utilization of natural resources, as scientific and environmental concerns are discussed from a historical perspective. For example, the first chapter of Soil discusses how depletion of this resource began as far back as the Neolithic age, and the book continues through time, closing with today's efforts to conserve soil in places such as Iceland. In addition to being great research resources, these titles are interesting enough for pleasure reading. They contain beautiful, full-page photographs, as well as a helpful time line. The bibliography and source notes are appreciated, and set a good example for younger researchers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781599351155
Publisher:
Morgan Reynolds, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/2009
Series:
Diminishing Resources Series
Pages:
111
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >