BN.com Gift Guide

Water: Simplified Web Services and XML Programming

Overview

* The essential guide to this exciting new programming language and the first book on the topic, written by one of the creators of Water programming
* Water is a new, native Web service programming language that allows the developer to program in XML syntax, replacing the different languages of the various technologies required to build Web applications
* Shows readers how to greatly speed and simplify their Web applications and Web services ...

See more details below
Paperback
$29.60
BN.com price
(Save 26%)$40.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (3) from $3.34   
Sending request ...

Overview

* The essential guide to this exciting new programming language and the first book on the topic, written by one of the creators of Water programming
* Water is a new, native Web service programming language that allows the developer to program in XML syntax, replacing the different languages of the various technologies required to build Web applications
* Shows readers how to greatly speed and simplify their Web applications and Web services development using Water
* Offers hands-on tutorials with more than 100 fully functional examples of Water applications
* Companion Web site provides additional information and connects the reader with an active user community

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764525360
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/20/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 402
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Meet the Author

Mike Plusch, developer of the Water language, is CTO and cofounder of Clear Methods. A language designer and XML expert, he has been building complex Web applications since 1994 for organizations such as Digitas, Harlequin, and Bowstreet, a pioneer in Web services. He holds a degree in Management and Computer Science from MIT and coauthored a chapter in Spinning the Semantic Web.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface.

Part I: Water Web Services and XML.

Chapter 1: Introduction to Pure Web Service Programming.

Chapter 2: ConciseXML Syntax and XML 1.0.

Chapter 3: Water Object: Representing Objects in XML.

Chapter 4: Water Type: Creating Custom Types—XSD.

Chapter 5: Water Contract: Specifying APIs—DTD and Schemas.

Chapter 6: Water Path: Accessing Data—XPATH.

Chapter 7: Water Transform: Transforming XML Objects—XSLT.

Chapter 8:L Water Import: Converting Data to XML.

Chapter 9: Water Export: Converting an Object to a String.

Chapter 10: Water Identifier and URI: Naming Resources.

Chapter 11: Water Filesystem: Using Files and Folders.

Chapter 12: Water Web: Accessing Remote Resources—WSDL.

Chapter 13: Water Protocol: Creating Custom Protocols—SOAP.

Chapter 14: Water Server: Customizing Application Servers.

Chapter 15: Water Namespace: Dividing the Web.

Chapter 16: Water Registry: Listing Resources—UDDI.

Part II: Water Programming.

Chapter 17: Water Flow: Controlling the Flow of Execution.

Chapter 18: Water Logic: Performing Boolean Comparisons.

Chapter 19: Water Methods: Learn Once, Use Everywhere.

Chapter 20: Water Math: Representing Calculations in XML.

Chapter 21: Water Date and Time: Managing Time.

Chapter 22: Water Object System: Understanding Multi-role Objects.

Chapter 23: Water Database: Unifying Relational and Object Models.

Chapter 24: Water Bridge to Java: Integrating Water and Java.

Chapter 25: Water Pattern: Introducing Readable Regular Expressions.

Part III: Advanced Water Programming.

Chapter 26: Water Metafield: Adding Metadata to Fields.

Chapter 27: Water Active Value: Changing Values from Static to Dynamic.

Chapter 28: Water Fluid Variable: Using Dynamic-Scoped Variables.

Chapter 29: Water View: Using A Capability Security Model.

Chapter 30: Water Execute: Simplifying How Software Writes Software.

Part IV: Water User Interface.

Chapter 31: Water Hypertext: Using XHTML for Presentation.

Chapter 32: Water App: Building Applications with Water.

Chapter 33: Water Bridge to JavaScript: Adding Logic to Web Pages.

Chapter 34: Water Style: Adding Water to CSS.

Chapter 35: Water Color: Making Color an XML Object.

Part V: Water Tools.

Chapter 36: Installing Water.

Chapter 37: Steam IDE: Using the Editor.

Chapter 38: Water Debug: Integrated Debugging with Development.

Chapter 39: Water Test: Building Self-Testing Software.

Chapter 40: Water Doc: Integrating Documentation and Code.

Part VI: Water in Practice.

Chapter 41: Water Process: Using Water Throughout the Software Lifecycle.

Chapter 42: Water Pics and Sketch: Unifying Diagrams and Code—UML.

Chapter 43: Building a Water App for Frequently Asked Questions.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)